Chronologies

US - Korea

Chronology


: US Forces Korea suspends training in Pocheon after a military vehicle driven by two US soldiers crashes into SUV killing four South Korean civilians.

: US Department of Justice files civil forfeiture complaint against 280 North Korean-linked cryptocurrency accounts.

: North Korea broadcasts alleged encrypted spy message for first time on state-run Radio Pyongyang’s YouTube channel.

: Esper says the goal of “complete, verifiable and irreversible” denuclearization of North Korea hasn’t changed, reiterating diplomacy as “best path forward.”

: North Korean TV stations air footage of damage caused by Typhoon Bavi as Kim Jong Un emphasizes need to minimize damage at politburo meeting.

: During speech on first day of Republican National Convention, Trump says he improved the 2012 US-Korea free trade agreement.

: South Korea reportedly to purchase 40 Lockheed Martin F-35 jets at the cost of $6.7 billion to be delivered by the end of 2021.

: Kim Jong Un reportedly delegates partial power to sister Kim Yo Jong, among other close aides.

: Department of State says it regularly “coordinates on diplomatic efforts” with South Korea on inter-Korean affairs following US Ambassador to South Korea Harry Harris’ statement reaffirming importance of inter-Korean cooperation working group.

: Kim Jong Un says he will present a new five-year economic development plan at a Eighth Congress of the Workers’ Party in January 2021.

: US and South Korea began computer-simulated annual Combined Command Post Training (CCPT/CPX) exercises planned to run until Aug. 28.

: President Trump says Kim Jong Un is among “world-class chess-players,” adding “we get along.”

: Kim Jong Un lifts lockdown on Kaesong, insisting on closed borders and rejection of international flood aid.

: ROK Unification Ministry launches investigation into North Korean civic and defector groups.

: ROK Ministry of Defense releases $252.7 billion five-year defense blueprint including acquisition of light aircraft carrier and multi-tiered missile interception system.

: US Deputy Special Representative for North Korea Alex Wong says “US is ready” to negotiate on North Korean denuclearization.

: US Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs David Stilwell says North Korea “must halt provocations, abide by its obligations under the UNSCRs, and engage in sustained negotiations” to achieve fully verified denuclearization during 33rd US-ASEAN Dialogue.

: Trump says “…you don’t know that, and they have spikes,” during interview when asked if he thought South Korea was faking its COVID-19 statistics.

: Trump says North Korea would be “wanting to make a deal” if US presidential elections were not months away.

: US Defense Secretary Mark Esper remarks that expanding “lateral partnerships with South Korea and other Asian nations can help deter China’s ‘bad behavior’” during Aspen Security Forum.

: Chicago Council of Global Affairs releases poll presenting that 90% of South Korean adults support the US-ROK alliance despite tensions over burden sharing.

: Donna Welton, former assistant chief of mission at the Embassy in Afghanistan, named new envoy for defense cost-sharing negotiations with South Korea replacing Jim DeHart.

: South Korea confirms former North Korean defector secretly crossed back to North Korea, but cannot confirm if he had COVID-19.

: Kim Jong Un calls his nuclear weapons a “reliable, effective” deterrent that could prevent a second war in address celebrating 67th anniversary of the Korean War armistice.

: North Korea declares state of emergency and places Kaesong under lockdown after allegedly finding South Korean runaway with COVID-19 symptoms in city.

: South Korea rejects UNC request to hold annual ceremony of Korean War armistice agreement at Freedom House in Panmunjom over coronavirus concerns and inter-Korean tensions.

: US flies spy plane RC-135W Rivet Joint over South Korea to reconnoiter North Korea, possibly in reaction to recent Central Military Commission meeting.

: Kim Jong Un rebukes officials during “field guidance” trip over “careless” construction of large-scale hospital planned for completion by October 10.

: South Korea says there were no discussions with US on US troop drawdown from Korean Peninsula following report that Pentagon provided troop cut proposals in March.

: Kim Jong Un presides over Central Military Commission meeting of the ruling Workers’ Party concerning “bolstering a war deterrent of the country.”

: Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan claims President Trump called South Koreans “terrible people” during private dinner, and questioned US protection of South Korea because “they don’t pay us.”

: North Korean Pyongyang science research council claims it is developing vaccine for COVID-19.

: Pompeo says he is “very hopeful” about resuming denuclearization talks with North Korea.

: Kim Yo Jong states that she doubts a US-North Korea summit will take place this year, adding that the summit would only serve to benefit the US.

: Kim Jong Un suspends planned military action against South Korea in fifth meeting of the Seventh Central Military Commission of the Workers’ Party.

: John Bolton, in his memoir, claims Trump thought the 2017 Singapore Summit with Kim Jong Un would be “great theater” and claims that Moon set unrealistic expectations concerning denuclearization.

: North Korea blows up inter-Korean liaison office in Kaesong, followed by US urging North Korea from “further counterproductive actions.”

: North Korean state media threatens South Korea with “severe punishment” over tepid approach to inter-Korean relations, saying “no need to sit face to face with the South Korean authorities.

: North Korean People’s Army’s General Staff says it is prepared to move armed forces into DMZ.

: North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Son Gwon vowed North Korea would build a reliable force to cope with long-term military threats from US, adding his country would “never again” provide US with “another package” that Trump could use to boast.

: North Korean director general of the American affairs department of the Foreign Ministry Kwon Jong-gun warns the US against meddling in inter-Korean affairs, threatening a “hair-riser” during American elections.

: North Korean Central News Agency says the country will cut all inter-Korean communication following order of Kim Yo Jong.

: Kim Jong Un convenes Politburo meeting of Workers’ Party concerning economic self-sufficiency.

: Kim Yo Jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, threatens to withdraw from inter-Korean military agreement and exchange projects over anti-Pyongyang leaflet activity.

: South Korean Ministry of Unification releases statement denoting suspension of leaflet activities as a risk to inter-Korean cooperation.

: In phone call Moon says he would accept Trump’s invitation to G7 summit.

: UN Command concludes that both North and South Korea violated 1953 armistice agreement during exchange of fire following multinational special investigation.

: US Justice Department indicts 28 North Koreans with facilitating $2.5 billion in illegal payments for Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons and missile program.

: Kim Jong Un, in first appearance in 20 days, convenes Central Military Commission meeting focused on increasing strategic nuclear deterrence capabilities, mentioning nothing on inter-Korean activity.

: South Korean President Moon Jae-in, in 3rd annual address to nation, says communications “not smooth” with North Korea, expressing hope for cooperation over coronavirus.

: North Korean military representative says South Korean military drills were a “grave provocation” and violated inter-Korean agreements.

: Kim Jong Un extends greetings to Chinese President Xi Jinping, congratulating him on a successful COVID-19 response.

: Pompeo reaffirms that denuclearization remains key US strategic goal following North Korean leader Kim’s public reappearance.

: North Korean defectors-turned South Korean assemblymen Thae Yong-ho and Ji Seong-ho apologized for “rash, careless” remarks confirming Kim’s public disappearance.

: North Korean soldiers fire at a South Korean guardpost across the DMZ, prompting South Korean retaliatory fire with no damages or casualties, in the first breach of 2018 inter-Korean military pact.

: State media announces Kim’s public reappearance at a ribbon cutting for the Sunchon Phosphatic Fertilizer Factory. Trump tweets the following day that he is glad to see Kim “back, and well!”

: South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul says the ROK government is aware of Kim’s location during parliamentary session, and that his absence could be because of “coronavirus concerns.”

: North Korean media outlet Rodong Sinmun releases report stating North Korean leader Kim “sent his appreciation” to workers of the Wonsan-Kalma tourist zone.

: Trump says he has a “very good idea” about the condition of North Korean leader Kim, but “can’t talk about it.”

: South Korean special adviser to the President Moon Chung-in says Kim Jong Un“is alive and well,” adding that the ROK government position is “firm.”

: Satellite imagery analysis emerges depicting North Korean leader Kim’s personal train at Wonson on April 21 and 23. Kim does not celebrate Military Foundation Day publicly.

: Trump says reports concerning Kim’s ailing health are “fake news,” “incorrect,” and are based off “old documents.  

: Trump says he doesn’t know about Kim’s health and wishes him well.

: CNN, citing officials, says US intelligence is closely monitoring reports on Kim’s health.

: North Korea-focused undercover media outlet Daily NK reports that Kim Jong Un’s health is in jeopardy following cardiovascular procedure on April 12, and is receiving treatment in Hyangsan County.

: South Korea’s Blue House says there are no unusual signs concerning North Korean leader Kim’s health.

: North Korean Foreign Ministry denies that North Korean leader sent any recent personal letter to Trump.

: Trump says he received personal letter from Kim Jong Un to press and during phone call with Moon.          

: South Korea’s ruling Democratic Party wins 180 of 300 seats in National Assembly elections in a landslide victory, to the United Future Party’s 103.

: US departments of State, Treasury, and Homeland Security, along with the FBI release interagency report detailing North Korean cyber offensive campaign to launder money and extort companies to funnel resources for nuclear weapons program.

: Kim Jong Un is notably absent from celebrations of country’s founding father Kim Il Sung’s birthday.

: South Korean JCS says North Korea fired two short-range projectiles believed to be anti-cruise missiles from Wonson province on eve of national founder Kim Il Sung’s birthday and South Korean elections.

: US Secretary of Defense Mark Esper says he discussed importance of an “equitable” defense cost-sharing agreement with South Korean counterpart Jeong Kyeong-doo, following reports that a tentative agreement was reached.

: North Korea’s director of central emergency anti-epidemic headquarters Pak Myong Su says there are no cases of COVID-19 in the country.

: DPRK Director General of the Foreign Ministry criticizes Pompeo’s call for renewed sanctions, despite Trump’s letter, and warns against further provocations against North Korea.

:  North Korea fires what appear to be two short-range ballistic missiles toward the East Sea.

: Pompeo says he called for renewed pressure and sanctions against North Korea at G7 teleconference.

: Trump holds phone call with South Korean President Moon Jae-in requesting medical equipment.

: Kim Yo Jong issues a press statement saying Trump sent a personal letter to Kim Jong Un expressing well wishes and offering assistance on COVID-19.  

:  North Korea fires two projectiles presumed to be short-range ballistic missiles toward the East Sea.         

: Trump, in an address to the nation, says the US may reevaluate travel warning to South Korea if the COVID-19 situation improves.     

: US Department of the Army suspends travel to and from South Korea by soldiers and their family due to COVID-19.

: South Korean JCS says North Korea fired three projectiles from Hamgyong Province toward the East Sea.         

: South Korean JCS says North Korea fired two short-range projectiles from Kangwon Province toward the East Sea.

: US Department of State issues a Level 3 travel advisory to South Korea due to COVID-19.

: Trump decries Parasite’s Oscar win, saying “We’ve got enough problems with South Korea on trade. On top of that, they give them best movie of the year?”                

: US CISA and the FBI release six Malware Analysis Reports (MARs) and update one MAR shedding light on malicious cyber activity from North Korea.

: US Department of State spokesperson Ortagus issues a press statement expressing concern over the vulnerability of North Korea to COVID-19, offering support and aid.

: Harris responds to criticism over his facial appearance, US Department of State spokesperson Morgan Ortagus also defends Harris.

: US Ambassador to South Korea Harry Harris says further work needs to be done on Special Measures Agreement, but gaps are closing. 

: US President Donald Trump says China has been “very helpful” with respect to Kim Jong Un, and says the US will be working closely with China on North Korea in luncheon remarks following US-China Phase One Trade Agreement signing with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He.

: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-hwa hold trilateral meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Motegi Toshimitsu; Pompeo urged South Korean cooperation in the Middle East, and Kang urged quicker reconciliation efforts with DPRK.

: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, in his New Year’s Address calls US behavior “gangster-like,” and states that North Korea will deploy a new strategic weapon.

: KCNA reports that Kim said North Korea is no longer bound by its moratorium on nuclear and long-range missile tests. Kim suggests a “new strategic weapon” will be unveiled in the near future.

: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un calls US behavior “gangster-like,” and states that North Korea will deploy a new strategic weapon.

: Kim calls for North Korea’s “positive and offensive security measures” at a year-end party plenum.

: Microsoft Corp. says it has taken control of 50 web domains used as a “command and control infrastructure” by North Korean hacking group Thallium to steal information.

: National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien says the US would be “extremely disappointed” should Kim resume testing and will “demonstrate” that disappointment.

: US denies reports that it asked South Korea to pay 10% to 20% more for US troops.

: Media report that the US is backing down from its demand for a five-fold increase in host-nation support.

: Trump says if North Korea tests an ICBM, the US will “deal with it.”

: Bolton laments Trump’s “failure” on North Korea.

: US provides Reuters with photos of US and ROK commandos simulating a raid on an enemy facility.

: The US and its allies call on UN members to report compliance on returning North Korean workers.

: North Korea criticizes the US for targeting its human-rights record and warns it will “pay dearly.” Kim Jong Un convenes a meeting of the Central Military Commission.

: Esper says he is hopeful for a restart of diplomacy with North Korea, although he and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Milley also describe the US “high levels of readiness.”

: Esper suggests North Korea will test if it doesn’t “feel satisfied.”

: Biegun arrives in South Korea for a three-day visit, urging North Korea to drop its “hostile” tone and return to nuclear talks.

: North Korea says its undertook a “crucial” test at Sohae the day before.

: US Assistant Secretary of State David Stilwell cautions North Korea against “ill-advised behavior” and notes that the US has “heard threats before.”

: Craft says the US is prepared to “simultaneously take concrete steps” with North Korea, but that the United Nations Security Council must respond to provocations.

: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says he is “very hopeful” North Korea will abide by its commitments. North Korea lashes out at Pompeo and his calls for sanctions enforcement.

: Trump downplays North Korean missile tests, saying Kim Jong Un is “too smart and has far too much to lose.” Senior North Korean official Kim Yong Chol decries Trump as sounding like a “heedless and erratic old man.”

: North Korea’s UN Ambassador Kim Song says denuclearization is off the negotiating table with the US.

: Trump and Moon speak by phone and underscore that talks with North Korea should continue. North Korea says it carried out a “very important test” at Sohae.

: US Ambassador to the UN Kelly Craft warns that the Security Council is united against North Korea’s repeated missile tests. In a nod to diplomacy, US withholds support for a North Korea human rights debate at the UN.

: Commercial satellite imagery shows movement at North Korea’s Sohae Launch Facility, and Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui warns against the “relapse of the dotage of a dotard” in Trump.

: Kim appears atop a white horse at Mt. Paektu, with cadre fallowing, hinting at a more confrontational stance moving forward.

: North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Ri Thae Song described the US as dragging out talks and warns that that it is “entirely up to the US what Christmas gift it will select to get.”

: Trump states confidence in Kim, but also describes him as “Rocket Man.”

: FBI arrests US blockchain expert who aided North Korea.

: North Korea test fires two ballistic missiles on the US Thanksgiving holiday and a day ahead of the two-year anniversary of its long-range missile and nuclear testing moratorium.

: South Korea asks US for help in resolving issues with Japan.

: South Korea backs away from scrapping its intelligence-sharing pact with Japan after US pressure.

: Biegun suggests Kim hasn’t empowered his negotiators to engage seriously in talks.

: Esper denies reports of a US threat to cut troops over host-nation support.

: US walks out of military cost-sharing talks with South Korea; lead negotiator James DeHart describes South Korea as “not responsive to our request for fair and equitable burden-sharing.”

: Kim supervises air force drills for the second time in three days despite US and South Korea’s postponement of drills.

: South Korea and the US resume talks over US demands for enhanced host-nation support.

: The US and South Korea postpone joint Combined Flying Training event to allow for diplomacy with North Korea.

: Esper presses Seoul to pay more for US troops and maintain its intelligence-sharing pact with Japan.

: Esper arrives in Seoul, with an eye to alliance management with Korea and Japan in general, and host-nation support talks in particular.

: North Korea warns of retaliation over reduced—but not ended—US and South Korea military drills.

: South Korea reiterates its intent to terminate its intelligence-sharing pact with Japan, raising concerns in Washington.

: North Korea says the “window of opportunity” for talks with the US is closing.

: A South Korean parliamentarian suggests North Korea and the US will resume talks in mid-November.

: South Korea and the US suspend an air-power drill for a second straight year.

: North Korea tests a “super-large” multiple rocket launcher and short-range missiles, marking a dozen different tests since May.

: North Korean Central Committee Vice Chair Kim Yong Chol warns that the good relationship between Kim and Trump is no guarantee that tensions will not flare and that an exchange of fire could happen at any time.

: South Korea abandons its status as a developing country in the WTO after Trump criticism.

: North Korea asks for new US and South Korea solutions for conflict. The US wins a court battle over control of a North Korean cargo ship used to skirt sanctions.

: South Korean students break into the US ambassador’s residence in protest over increased host-nation support.

: Bolton writes in a letter to his political action committee that North Korea “isn’t our friend and will never be” and that they will “never give up their nuclear weapons. Period.”

: Kim rides a white horse on Mt. Paektu, revered as the birthplace of the Korean nation, symbolizing resistance to the US and a significant move in the near future.

: The United States and North Korea hold working-level talks in Stockholm.

: North Korea describes the US as having arrived at the talks “empty-handed,” although the US dismissed the assertion as not reflecting the “content or spirit” of the dialogue.

: North Korea announces a submarine-launched ballistic missile test, though with Kim absent during testing.

: KCNA announces working-level talks with the US within a week.

: North Korea urges Trump to adopt a bold move toward reviving diplomacy.

: KCNA reports that a lack of US progress casts doubt on future talks.

: Bolton contends that Trump’s courtship of Kim is increasing North Korea’s power.

: North Korea praises Trump’s “wise political decision” to fire National Security Adviser John Bolton.

: Trump says he “probably” won’t visit Pyongyang for a next round of talks with Kim, but might in the future.

: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reportedly invites US President Donald Trump to visit Pyongyang, according to South Korea’s Joongang Ilbo.

: US sanctions three North Korean state-sponsored groups linked to hacking and high-profile ransomware attacks.

: North Korea’s state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reports a test of a “super-large” multiple rocket launcher.

: North Korea says it is willing to resume talks late month, but calls for a new US approach.

: North Korea fires missiles despite moves to restart talks with the US.

: US Special Representative Stephen Biegun confirms that denuclearization talks have stalled.

: North Korea tells the UN to cut its international staff given undue US influence.

: North Korea says its hopes for more dialogue with the White House are “gradually disappearing,” and threatens to reconsider its conciliatory gestures.

: North Korea condemns Secretary Pompeo’s recent remarks and suggests that DPRK expectations for more US dialogue are “gradually disappearing.”

: ROK Vice Foreign Minister Cho cautions Ambassador Harris on US statements criticizing South Korea’s decision to withdraw from its intelligence-sharing pact with Japan.

: Secretary Pompeo says in an American Legion speech that “we recognized that North Korea’s rogue behavior could not be ignored.”

: US says the ROK decision to withdraw from intelligence-sharing pact endangers US troops.

: North Korea launches its seventh projectile test since July 25. Korean Central News Agency reports the successful test of a “super-large multiple rocket launcher.”

: South Korea scraps intelligence-sharing pact with Japan. North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho describes Secretary Pompeo as a “diehard toxin” and “impudent” and says North Korea is ready for dialogue or a standoff.

: North Korea describes a US mid-range cruise missile test and plans to deploy F-35 jets to South Korea as “dangerous” and possibly “triggering a new cold war.”

: KCNA reports Kim Jong Un oversaw the latest firing of missiles.

: North Korea test-fires two short-range ballistic missiles into the Sea of Japan, “the sixth launch of projectiles by the country since July 25.”

: North Korea says any deployment of US intermediate-range missiles in the ROK would be a “reckless act.”

: North Korea launches “the fifth round of launches by Pyongyang in just over two week,” sending two short-range ballistic missiles into the Sea of Japan.

: Trump says Kim is open to more talks following US-ROK exercises.

: Lee Soo-hyuk is named new ROK ambassador to the US. Defense Secretary Mark Esper meets ROK leaders amid Korea-Japan dispute and burden sharing debate. Trump notes a letter from Kim Jong Un complaining of military exercises.

: Trump tweets that “talks have begun” on US-ROK defense burden-sharing.

: Secretary Pompeo expresses hope that talks will resume within weeks.

: UN Sanctions Committee on North Korea releases a report showing DPRK-directed cyberattacks have raised to date $2 billion in funds to support its WMD programs.

: South Korea’s military reports that two “short-range ballistic missiles” were launched by North Korea into the Sea of Japan.

: National Security Adviser Bolton reminds Kim of his missile pledge following the DPRK warning that it may pursue a “new road.”

: US and South Korea hold joint-military exercises Dong Maeng 19-2, a “scaled-back combined command post exercise” that is executed primarily through computer simulations.

: Trump plays down the series of short-range missile launches. North Korean Foreign Minister Ri skips the ASEAN Regional Forum meeting.

: DPRK launches short-range missiles.

: North Korea launches two missiles from the Wonsan area. ROK Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo says the missiles, which flew 250 km and reached a height of 30 km.

: DPRK launches two short-range missiles, traveling 690 km and 430 km, and describe its missile launches as a warning to ROK “warmongers.” Pompeo says he expects working-level talks with North Korea within weeks.

: National Security Adviser Bolton meets ROK officials to discuss North Korea and the alliance.

: Kim Jong Un inspects a newly built submarine with enhanced tactical abilities and weapons systems.

: Secretary Pompeo rejects North Korean charges that US-ROK exercises breach any Trump-Kim agreement.

: Assistant Secretary of State Stilwell visits Seoul as the Korea-Japan dispute worsens. Trump bemoans the request by the two US allies to “get involved.”

: Secretary Pompeo expresses hope that the US and North Korea can be “more creative” in nuclear talks. DPRK says nuclear talks are at risk if US-ROK exercises take place.

: Assistant Secretary of State for East Asia and Pacific Affairs David Stilwell states that the US won’t seek to mediate the South Korea-Japan dispute, encouraging both to focus on key regional issues, including North Korea.

: ROK Foreign Minister Kang tells Secretary of State Pompeo that Japan’s export curbs are “undesirable.”

: DPRK’s Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui states that a Trump-Kim meeting at the DMZ “would serve as another meaningful occasion in further deepening the personal relations between the two leaders and advancing bilateral relations.”

: President Trump visits South Korea. He and President Moon “reaffirm” the US-ROK alliance, describing it as “the linchpin of peace and security in the Indo-Pacific.” Trump shakes hands with North Korean Chairman Kim Jong Un in Panmunjom and agrees to continue negotiations with North Korea.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Biegun meets South Korea’s Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Lee Do-hoon in Seoul ahead of President Trump’s visit to discuss resuming talks with Pyongyang.

: President Moon Jae-in says the US and DPRK are in talks over a third summit.

: US DIA Director Lt. Gen. Ashley states that the intelligence community assesses that Kim Jong Un “is not ready to denuclearize.”

: Kim Jong Un receives letter from Trump with “excellent content.”

: South Korea’s Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Lee Do-hoon meets US Special Representative for North Korea Stephen Biegun in Washington DC to discuss ways to facilitate the resumption of US-North Korea dialogue.

: Kim Jong Un, alongside Chinese President Xi, calls for a US response to stalled nuclear talks.

: US submits report to the UN Security Council’s North Korea Sanctions Committee blaming North Korea for breaching a UN-imposed cap on fuel imports through illicit ship-to-ship transfers.

: National Security Adviser John Bolton suggests a third summit is possible and up to Kim Jong Un. Trump publicly opposes using CIA informants against Kim, and says he received a “beautiful letter” from Kim.

: DPRK marks the one-year anniversary of the Singapore talks with a call for the US to change its “hostile policy.”

: US Ambassador to South Korea Harry Harris urges South Korean companies to avoid using Huawei equipment.

: Reports indicate diplomat Kim Hyok Chol is in detention and under investigation, but was not executed by firing squad as earlier reported.

: DPRK lead envoy Kim Yong Chol is seen with Kim Jong Un, despite reports of his demise.

: Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan suggests it is not necessary to resume major joint exercises with South Korea, allowing room for diplomacy with the North.

: DPRK warns that talks with the US will not resume without a “new calculation.”

: DPRK suggests “biggest issue” in relations with the US is the impounded ship.

: DPRK demands the return of the seized tanker Wise Honest.

: DPRK conducts second missile test of the month from a tracked vehicle.

: US seizes the Wise Honest, North Korea’s second largest cargo ship accused of violating international sanctions by transporting coal and heavy machinery back to North Korea.

: The 11th round of US, Japan, South Korea Defense Trilateral Talks (DTT) is held in Seoul to discuss regional security issues.

: Pentagon suspends efforts to recover POW/MIA remains as DPRK talks stall.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Stephen Biegun visits Tokyo and Seoul to meet South Korean and Japanese officials.

: North Korea tests new missile similar to Russia’s SS-26 Iskander from a mobile transporter erector launcher.

: US federal judge orders three Chinese banks to provide documents on a Hong Kong-based front company for North Korea’s nuclear program.

: North Korea warns of “undesired consequences” if no change in US position.

: North Korea accuses US of pressuring South Korea on implementing sanctions.

: Air forces of the United States, South Korea, and Australia undertake two weeks of “scaled-back” joint air drills around the Korean Peninsula, replacing the large-scale Max Thunder drill.

: North Korea dismisses Bolton’s call for denuclearization sign as “dim-witted.”

: Despite North Korean criticism, Pompeo underscores that “it’ll be my team” on North Korea.

: North Korea tests new tactical weapon, or a short-range guided missile, and calls for Pompeo to be dropped from talks.

: CSIS report reveals April 12 imagery of five specialized rail cars near its Uranium Enrichment Facility and Radiochemistry Laboratory at Yongbyon.

: Trump calls for a third summit with Kim and hope for a removal of nuclear weapons and sanctions on North Korea.

: Kim Jong Un signals end-of-year deadline for new US stance.

: DPRK central committee meets amid “tense situation.”

: President Moon travels to Washington DC to meet President Trump for a summit on North Korean diplomacy.

: Former UNC/CFC/USFK Commander Gen. Vincent Brooks calls for a “visible but not accessible” international development fund to promote North Korean denuclearization.

: South Korea detains a domestic ship over North Korea sanctions violation.

: Moon Jae-in describes hope that North Korea responds positively to US-South Korea efforts in advance of his Washington trip.

: DPRK describes Spain embassy raid as “grave terrorist attack,” but refrains from blaming the US directly.

: Reuters reports Trump called on Kim to denuclearize completely in one-page Bolton memo delivered at Hanoi. Pompeo meets counterpart Kang Kyung-wha in New York.

: UNC/CFC/USFK Commander Gen. Robert Abrams describes North Korean activity as “inconsistent with denuclearization” to House Armed Services Committee.

: South Korean Unification Minister-designate Kim Yeon-chul promises to seek a “creative solution” for the US and North Korea to meet again.

: Free Joseon, a political organization that opposes Kim Jong Un, claims responsibility for raid on the North Korean Embassy in Spain on Feb. 22. Information stolen from the embassy was later shared with the FBI, but the US government claims no involvement in the operation.

: North Korean officials return to liaison office after weekend pullout and Trump move to stem new sanctions.

: Trump blocks new “large-scale” sanctions directed at North Korea, in reality aimed at two Chinese shipping companies in violation of sanctions.

: ROK Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo advises a parliamentary defense committee that despite US think tank reports of DPRK launch preparation, “it’s hasty to call it missile-related activity.”

: Pompeo says US hopes to continue talks with North Korea.

: North Korea warns it may suspend nuclear talks, but describes leaders’ relationship as “mysteriously wonderful.”

: Blue House adviser Moon Ching-in suggests US “all or nothing” approach won’t work with North Korea.

: UN Panel of Experts reports North Korea sanctions violations by 20 countries in 66-page report.

: Special Representative Biegun suggests diplomacy is “very much alive,” despite CSIS reports around Sohae rocket testing site.

: North Korea’s Rodong Sinmun reports that the public blames the US for the Hanoi summit ending without agreement.

: South Korea FM Kang signs Special Measures Agreement with US Ambassador Harry Harris, formally agreeing to pay $915 million for the upkeep of US Forces, Korea.

: North Korea Hanoi documentary focuses on Kim-Trump relationship, not summit breakdown.

: US analysts from 38 North and CSIS’s Beyond Parallel report that North Korea’s Sohae Launch Facility is returning to normal operating status after being moderately dismantled following the Singapore Summit, analysis based on commercial satellite imagery acquired on March 6.

: National Intelligence Service Director Suh Hoon says ROK and US military intelligence has a “detailed grasp” of DPRK uranium enrichment and other nuclear and missile facilities.

: Seoul calls for a quick resumption of talks after Hanoi breakdown.

: Sen. Pat Toomey and Sen. Chris Van Hollen introduce the Otto Warmbier Banking Restrictions Involving North Korea (BRINK) act.

: South Korean Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Lee Do-hoon visits Washington DC to meet Special Representative Biegun to coordinate plans following the US-DPRK second summit.

: US and South Korean militaries hold the inaugural Dong Maeng joint military exercise, a scaled-back version of the annual Foal Eagle and Key Resolve series.

: Trump says North Korea has no economic future with nuclear weapons.

: KCNA reports that the US and North Korea “deepened mutual respect and trust” in Hanoi. Kim vows to meet again, Trump says both sides know the issues.

: President Moon pledges to work with Trump and Kim after failed talks. US and South Korea suggest replacement of spring exercises with smaller drills.

: On second day of Hanoi summit, Trump walks away over reported DPRK sanctions demands. Trump credits China as a “big help” with North Korea.

: Trump hails North Korea’s “awesome” potential and that he is “satisfied” with pace of denuclearization.

: Twenty House Democrats introduce a resolution calling for an end to the Korean War but maintenance of US troops on the Peninsula.

: North Korea urges Trump to disregard skeptics.

: Special Representative Biegun meets DPRK counterpart in Hanoi for a second day of pre-summit negotiations.

: Trump confirms decreasing US troops in ROK not on summit agenda. White House suggests that if North Korea follows through on denuclearization, the US will explore “how to mobilize for investment, improve infrastructure, enhance food security, and more.”

: Chairmen of the House Foreign Affairs Committee Eliot Engel, Armed Services Committee Adam Smith, and Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Adam Schiff send letter to Trump urging the White House to stop withholding information on North Korea negotiations.

: Trump suggests he expects to meet Kim again after Hanoi and raises prospect of easing North Korea sanctions.

: The Wall Street Journal reports the US is weighing opening a liaison office in North Korea.

: Secretary Pompeo says US is hoping to get “far down the road” with North Korea, adding pillars to “reduce tension, reduce military risks” in addition to denuclearization.

: US Indo-Pacific Commander Adm. Philip Davidson supports US intelligence community position that North Korea is unlikely to give up all its nuclear weapons or production facilities.

: South Korea agrees to pay $915 million in 2019 for US troops in Korea.

: Special Representative Biegun holds talks in Pyongyang.

: In comments at Stanford University, Special Representative Biegun notes North and South militaries working with UNC and USFK for confidence building and tension reduction. He notes that the US is willing to wait on key objectives, and that Trump is ready to formally end the Korean War.

: Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats tells Senate Intelligence Committee that “we currently assess North Korea will seek to retain its WMD capability and is unlikely to completely give up its nuclear weapons and production capability.”

: US National Security Adviser John Bolton calls on North Korea for a “significant sign of a strategic decision to give up nuclear weapons.”

: ROK Foreign Minister Kang calls for “concrete results on denuclearization” at Trump-Kim second summit.

: State media reports Kim Jong Un will advance “step by step” and was “satisfied” by recent Washington meetings and a letter from Trump. Secretary of State Pompeo hails “progress” in talks in Washington and Stockholm.

: CSIS report describes Sino-ri, one of 20 undeclared ballistic missile bases in North Korea, as a missile headquarters.

: Seoul describes US demands for funding increase for support of US forces in South Korea as “unacceptable.”

: US Special Representative for North Korean Policy Biegun meets Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui in Stockholm.

: ROK and US officials agree to seek a UN Security Council sanctions exemption for inter-Korean joint projects.

: Trump meets Worker Party Vice Chairman Kim Yong Chol and Special Envoy Kim Hyok Chol at White House.

: Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha notes that US and South Korea are discussing “corresponding measures” to reward North Korea for steps toward denuclearization.

: President Donald Trump unveils the US Missile Defense Review, which labels North Korea an “extraordinary threat.”

: North Korean Special Envoy Kim Yong Chol travels to Washington DC to meet Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Special Representative for North Korea Stephen Biegun to “make progress on the commitments President Trump and Chairman Kim Jong Un made at their summit in Singapore.”

: President Moon Jae-in calls for “bold steps: ahead of second Trump-Kim summit.

: In New Year address, Kim Jong Un says he is ready to meet Trump “at any time” and demands an end to sanctions.

: Chosun Ilbo reports that Kim sent Trump a “conciliatory message” about the stalled negotiations. Departing Defense Secretary Mattis urges the US to stand firm alongside its allies.

: Chosun Ilbo reports that Kim sent Trump a “conciliatory message” about the stalled negotiations. Departing Defense Secretary Mattis urges the US to stand firm alongside its allies.

: Blue House says Kim Jong Un wants more summits with Moon in 2019.

: Blue House says Kim Jong Un wants more summits with Moon in 2019.

: Inter-Korean groundbreaking for rail and road reconnection occurs.

: Inter-Korean groundbreaking for rail and road reconnection occurs.

: US Federal Court Judge Beryl Howell orders North Korea to pay Otto Warmbier’s parents $501 million for “torture, hostage-taking, and extrajudicial killing.”

: US Federal Court Judge Beryl Howell orders North Korea to pay Otto Warmbier’s parents $501 million for “torture, hostage-taking, and extrajudicial killing.”

: ROK announces that the US will help it get flu drugs to the DPRK, despite stalled nuclear talks.

: ROK announces that the US will help it get flu drugs to the DPRK, despite stalled nuclear talks.

: Defense Secretary Mattis announces his resignation.

: Defense Secretary Mattis announces his resignation.

: ROK MND announces smaller military drills with the US in 2019 given North Korea negotiations.

: North Korean state media says denuclearization includes “eliminating the US nuclear threat.”

: ROK MND announces smaller military drills with the US in 2019 given North Korea negotiations.

: North Korean state media says denuclearization includes “eliminating the US nuclear threat.”

: Special Representative Biegun announces that the US will try to expedite humanitarian aid and review a ban for aid workers on his arrival for a four-day visit to Seoul.

: Special Representative Biegun announces that the US will try to expedite humanitarian aid and review a ban for aid workers on his arrival for a four-day visit to Seoul.

: KCNA commentary warns the US over stalled negotiations.

: KCNA commentary warns the US over stalled negotiations.

: US Missile Defense Agency reports successful missile defense system test aimed at intermediate-range missiles.

: US Missile Defense Agency reports successful missile defense system test aimed at intermediate-range missiles.

: US Treasury sanctions three DPRK officials for human rights violations.

: US Treasury sanctions three DPRK officials for human rights violations.

: Middlebury Institute Nonproliferation Center report suggests North Korea is expanding facilities to house long-range missiles.

: Middlebury Institute Nonproliferation Center report suggests North Korea is expanding facilities to house long-range missiles.

: Defense Secretary Mattis identifies North Korea as the most urgent threat to the US. National Security Advisor John Bolton says despite lapses, a second summit will occur.

: Defense Secretary Mattis identifies North Korea as the most urgent threat to the US. National Security Advisor John Bolton says despite lapses, a second summit will occur.

: US Army Pacific Commander Gen. Robert Brown describes the alliance as rock solid, and that to maintain readiness, high-level exercises should take place off-peninsula.

: US Army Pacific Commander Gen. Robert Brown describes the alliance as rock solid, and that to maintain readiness, high-level exercises should take place off-peninsula.

: Secretary Pompeo suggests a need for patience in resolving the denuclearization issue and underscores that sanctions will remain in place.

: Secretary Pompeo suggests a need for patience in resolving the denuclearization issue and underscores that sanctions will remain in place.

: IAEA reports the DPRK is expanding operations at its main nuclear site at Yongbyon.

: IAEA reports the DPRK is expanding operations at its main nuclear site at Yongbyon.

: Secretary Pompeo suggests progress on denuclearization should accompany better inter-Korean relations. Defense Secretary Mattis announces reduction in scope of 2019 US and ROK Foal Eagle exercises.

: Secretary Pompeo suggests progress on denuclearization should accompany better inter-Korean relations. Defense Secretary Mattis announces reduction in scope of 2019 US and ROK Foal Eagle exercises.

: US Treasury sanctions a South African for helping supply oil to the DPRK. North Korea destroys 10 guard posts in the JSA.

: Special Representative Biegun and counterpart Lee Do-hoon convene a US-ROK working group aimed at strengthening coordination on DPRK policy.

: US Treasury sanctions a South African for helping supply oil to the DPRK. North Korea destroys 10 guard posts in the JSA.

: Special Representative Biegun and counterpart Lee Do-hoon convene a US-ROK working group aimed at strengthening coordination on DPRK policy.

: North Korea state media reports that Kim Jong Un visited the site of a successful test of a “newly developed, ultramodern tactical weapon.” Pompeo thanks North Korea and Sweden for the release of US citizen Bruce Byron Lowrance, detained in October.

: North Korea state media reports that Kim Jong Un visited the site of a successful test of a “newly developed, ultramodern tactical weapon.” Pompeo thanks North Korea and Sweden for the release of US citizen Bruce Byron Lowrance, detained in October.

: President Moon tells visiting Vice President Mike Pence that the alliance has made the current situation possible. Pence says Trump will meet Kim in 2019, but won’t allow broken promises.

: President Moon tells visiting Vice President Mike Pence that the alliance has made the current situation possible. Pence says Trump will meet Kim in 2019, but won’t allow broken promises.

: US Congressional Commission reports China has relaxed sanctions enforcement on North Korea.

: US Congressional Commission reports China has relaxed sanctions enforcement on North Korea.

: Center for Strategic and International Studies says it identified 13 of an estimated 20 undeclared missile bases inside North Korea. Trump says DPRK missile sites are “nothing new.”

: DPRK’s Rodong Sinmun condemns US-ROK small-scale exercises by the Korean Marine Exchange Program as a violation of the Sept. 19 Pyongyang accords.

: Center for Strategic and International Studies says it identified 13 of an estimated 20 undeclared missile bases inside North Korea. Trump says DPRK missile sites are “nothing new.”

: DPRK’s Rodong Sinmun condemns US-ROK small-scale exercises by the Korean Marine Exchange Program as a violation of the Sept. 19 Pyongyang accords.

: Democratic Sen. Ed Markey calls on Trump to ease the ban on US aid workers to DPRK.

: Democratic Sen. Ed Markey calls on Trump to ease the ban on US aid workers to DPRK.

: Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford notes that US-DPRK talks could affect US military posture.

: Gen. Brooks meets FM Kang, saying the alliance has “overcome a range of challenges as a team amid the changing situation on the Korean Peninsula.”

: Secretary of State Pompeo’s meeting in New York with North Korean Kim Yong Chol is abruptly canceled.

: Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford notes that US-DPRK talks could affect US military posture.

: Gen. Brooks meets FM Kang, saying the alliance has “overcome a range of challenges as a team amid the changing situation on the Korean Peninsula.”

: Secretary of State Pompeo’s meeting in New York with North Korean Kim Yong Chol is abruptly canceled.

: Outgoing USFK Commander Gen. Vincent Brooks voices support for September inter-Korean military accord.

: Outgoing USFK Commander Gen. Vincent Brooks voices support for September inter-Korean military accord.

: US and ROK resume low-key military drills. North Korea warns of strengthening its nuclear arsenal without US sanctions relief in advance of Pompeo meeting.

: US and ROK resume low-key military drills. North Korea warns of strengthening its nuclear arsenal without US sanctions relief in advance of Pompeo meeting.

: Defense Secretary James Mattis describes “continuity for the ROK-led future CFC.”

: Defense Secretary James Mattis describes “continuity for the ROK-led future CFC.”

: No-fly zone and military drill ban take effect along DMZ.

: No-fly zone and military drill ban take effect along DMZ.

: Secretary of Defense Mattis and South Korean Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo meet for the 50th Security Consultative Meeting in Washington, DC.  The agree to strategic guidelines that aim to reduce uncertainty over transfer of wartime operational control.

: US announces Pompeo meeting with a DPRK counterpart in early November. ROK and US agree to wartime operational control transfer principles for facilitation.

: Secretary of Defense Mattis and South Korean Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo meet for the 50th Security Consultative Meeting in Washington, DC.  The agree to strategic guidelines that aim to reduce uncertainty over transfer of wartime operational control.

: US announces Pompeo meeting with a DPRK counterpart in early November. ROK and US agree to wartime operational control transfer principles for facilitation.

: ROK FM Kang asks US for “maximum flexibility” on Iran sanctions.

: ROK FM Kang asks US for “maximum flexibility” on Iran sanctions.

: Special Representative Biegun meets ROK counterpart Lee Do-hoon.

: Special Representative Biegun meets ROK counterpart Lee Do-hoon.

: ROK and DPRK agree to scrap 22 guard posts along the DMZ. ROK Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo reaffirms the temporary status of THAAD deployments.

: ROK and DPRK agree to scrap 22 guard posts along the DMZ. ROK Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo reaffirms the temporary status of THAAD deployments.

: US and ROK chairmen of respective Joint Chiefs of Staff hold annual Military Committee Meeting, underscoring the alliance.

: US and ROK chairmen of respective Joint Chiefs of Staff hold annual Military Committee Meeting, underscoring the alliance.

: US Treasury expresses “deep concern” over ROK bank plans for DPRK. UNC, ROK and DPRK hold second round of military working-level talks aimed at demilitarization.

: US Treasury expresses “deep concern” over ROK bank plans for DPRK. UNC, ROK and DPRK hold second round of military working-level talks aimed at demilitarization.

: US and ROK agree to suspend more drills in an effort to bolster diplomacy with the DPRK. US official suggests that the next US-DPRK summit will take place in the new year.

: US and ROK agree to suspend more drills in an effort to bolster diplomacy with the DPRK. US official suggests that the next US-DPRK summit will take place in the new year.

: Media reports suggest the US is opposed to inter-Korean agreement on a no-fly zone. The Wall Street Journal describes a US-ROK “wrangle” over DPRK policy.

: Media reports suggest the US is opposed to inter-Korean agreement on a no-fly zone. The Wall Street Journal describes a US-ROK “wrangle” over DPRK policy.

: ROK MND announces that UNC, ROK, and DPRK representatives are meeting about disarming the joint security area. State Department announces Special Representative for North Korea Policy Stephen Biegun is traveling to Moscow, Paris, and Brussels for working-level meetings.

: ROK MND announces that UNC, ROK, and DPRK representatives are meeting about disarming the joint security area. State Department announces Special Representative for North Korea Policy Stephen Biegun is traveling to Moscow, Paris, and Brussels for working-level meetings.

: Moon argues that Kim is sincere and should see rewards for abandoning nuclear weapons.

: Moon argues that Kim is sincere and should see rewards for abandoning nuclear weapons.

: Seoul says Pyongyang intends to abolish all nuclear weapons.

: Seoul says Pyongyang intends to abolish all nuclear weapons.

: Seoul says it has made no change on DPRK sanctions.

: Seoul says it has made no change on DPRK sanctions.

: ROK says Secretary Pompeo complained about inter-Korean military agreement.

: ROK says Secretary Pompeo complained about inter-Korean military agreement.

: President Moon suggests that a “new order is being created on the Korean Peninsula.” Pompeo describes seeing a “path” to denuclearization. Trump says a second summit will come after midterm elections.

: President Moon suggests that a “new order is being created on the Korean Peninsula.” Pompeo describes seeing a “path” to denuclearization. Trump says a second summit will come after midterm elections.

: Secretary Pompeo says North Korea is ready to let inspectors into the Punggye-ri nuclear test site and Sohae missile engine test facility after US and DPRK agree on logistics.

: Secretary Pompeo says North Korea is ready to let inspectors into the Punggye-ri nuclear test site and Sohae missile engine test facility after US and DPRK agree on logistics.

: Secretary Pompeo meets Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang and notes progress on Singapore commitments. Blue House announces Pompeo and Kim agree to a second US-DPRK summit.

: Secretary Pompeo meets Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang and notes progress on Singapore commitments. Blue House announces Pompeo and Kim agree to a second US-DPRK summit.

: Pompeo suggests optimism for “better understandings, deeper progress and a plan forward.”

: Pompeo suggests optimism for “better understandings, deeper progress and a plan forward.”

: US Treasury sanctions a Turkish firm and a DPRK diplomat for weapons trade.

: The Arms Control Association announces release of North Korea Denuclearization Digest.

: US Treasury sanctions a Turkish firm and a DPRK diplomat for weapons trade.

: The Arms Control Association announces release of North Korea Denuclearization Digest.

: ROK FM Kang Kyung-wha suggests that the US should hold off its demand for a DPRK declaration and accept a verified closure of the Yongbyon nuclear facility.

: ROK FM Kang Kyung-wha suggests that the US should hold off its demand for a DPRK declaration and accept a verified closure of the Yongbyon nuclear facility.

: Washington announces Pompeo will visit Pyongyang again despite negative signals. Pyongyang says its steps toward denuclearization must be met by US concessions.

: Washington announces Pompeo will visit Pyongyang again despite negative signals. Pyongyang says its steps toward denuclearization must be met by US concessions.

: Trump tells US public rally he and Kim “fell in love.”

: Trump tells US public rally he and Kim “fell in love.”

: DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho tells UNGA that the DPRK in “no way” will disarm without trust.

: DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho tells UNGA that the DPRK in “no way” will disarm without trust.

: Trump underscores there is no timeframe for denuclearization and anticipates a second summit with Kim. Pompeo tells UNSC the only path for the DPRK is diplomacy and denuclearization.

: Trump underscores there is no timeframe for denuclearization and anticipates a second summit with Kim. Pompeo tells UNSC the only path for the DPRK is diplomacy and denuclearization.

: Moon tells UN General Assembly that “ending the Korean War is an urgent task” and calls for a peace regime.

: Moon tells UN General Assembly that “ending the Korean War is an urgent task” and calls for a peace regime.

: Incoming USFK Commander Gen. Robert Abrams suggests a slight dip in readiness with the suspension of exercises and acknowledges tactical risk if US troops were removed from the Korean Peninsula in Senate confirmation hearings.

: Trump praises Kim, but says sanctions must stay for now.

: Incoming USFK Commander Gen. Robert Abrams suggests a slight dip in readiness with the suspension of exercises and acknowledges tactical risk if US troops were removed from the Korean Peninsula in Senate confirmation hearings.

: Trump praises Kim, but says sanctions must stay for now.

: Updated KORUS Free Trade Agreement is finalized.

: Updated KORUS Free Trade Agreement is finalized.

: Moon says Kim wants another Trump summit to speed denuclearization.

: Moon says Kim wants another Trump summit to speed denuclearization.

: DPRK invites foreign experts to watch closure of missile engine testing site and launch pad at Tongchang-ri. US says it is ready to resume talks with North Korea.

: DPRK invites foreign experts to watch closure of missile engine testing site and launch pad at Tongchang-ri. US says it is ready to resume talks with North Korea.

: Kim Jong Un says North and South Korea agreed to denuclearization efforts.

: Kim Jong Un says North and South Korea agreed to denuclearization efforts.

: Moon meets Kim, who credits earlier meeting with Trump as stabilizing region and promises to visit Seoul. US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley accuses Russia of “cheating” on DPRK sanctions.

: Moon meets Kim, who credits earlier meeting with Trump as stabilizing region and promises to visit Seoul. US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley accuses Russia of “cheating” on DPRK sanctions.

: New Yorker article describes US North Korea policy advisors: “None of them is where the President is.” Pompeo accuses Russia of actively undermining sanctions.

: New Yorker article describes US North Korea policy advisors: “None of them is where the President is.” Pompeo accuses Russia of actively undermining sanctions.

: Two Koreas hold working-level military talks. US imposes North Korea-related sanctions on Russian and Chinese technology firms. US approves possible $2.6 billion in military sales to ROK.

: US accuses Russia of covering up breaches of North Korea sanctions. Despite US warning, North Korea coal shipped into South Korea. DPRK decries US accusations of computer network hacking as a “smear campaign.”

: Two Koreas hold working-level military talks. US imposes North Korea-related sanctions on Russian and Chinese technology firms. US approves possible $2.6 billion in military sales to ROK.

: US accuses Russia of covering up breaches of North Korea sanctions. Despite US warning, North Korea coal shipped into South Korea. DPRK decries US accusations of computer network hacking as a “smear campaign.”

: Two Koreas open liaison offices with around-the-clock communications channels.

: Two Koreas open liaison offices with around-the-clock communications channels.

: Two more US service members’ remains returned in DPRK handover.

: Two more US service members’ remains returned in DPRK handover.

: Kim Jong Un sends Trump a letter requesting a follow-on meeting.

: Kim Jong Un sends Trump a letter requesting a follow-on meeting.

: North Korea military parade features floats and no long-range missiles. Kim Jong Un tells Chinese envoy North Korea he is upholding US nuclear deal.

: North Korea military parade features floats and no long-range missiles. Kim Jong Un tells Chinese envoy North Korea he is upholding US nuclear deal.

: President Trump states he is expecting a “positive” letter from Kim Jong Un.

: President Trump states he is expecting a “positive” letter from Kim Jong Un.

: President Moon underscores the need for the DPRK’s “complete denuclearization; and Trump thanks Kim Jong Un for “unwavering faith” after Kim suggests a denuclearization timeline.

: US accuses North Korea of engaging in a global cyber-crime wave.

: President Moon underscores the need for the DPRK’s “complete denuclearization; and Trump thanks Kim Jong Un for “unwavering faith” after Kim suggests a denuclearization timeline.

: US accuses North Korea of engaging in a global cyber-crime wave.

: US President Donald Trump speaks with South Korea President Moon in advance of ROK delegates heading north and Moon’s visit to New York.

: US State Department extends ban on US citizens’ travel to North Korea for another year.

: Trump says he thinks US is “doing well” in its diplomacy with North Korea, hails his relationship with Kim, and says there are no reasons to resume US-ROK military exercises at the present though, if he elected, they would be “far bigger than ever before.”

: Secretary Mattis announces that the US and ROK have no plans to suspend military exercises that are planned next year.

: DPRK’s Rodong Sinmun accuses US of “double dealing” and “hatching a criminal plot” against Pyongyang with drill preparations.

: Trump cancels Pompeo visit to the DPRK with new special representative for North Korea, Stephen Biegun.

: USFK commander Gen. Brooks acknowledges security risks in defense scale-down at DMZ, but is dealing with “change and uncertainty in stride.”

: Satellite imagery shows DPRK halted work to dismantle Sohae satellite launch site in the first part of August.

: US Treasury sanctions Russian firms for violating sanctions on the DPRK.

: Divided family reunions begin at Mount Kumgang.

: DPRK presses demands for end-of-war declaration ahead of Pompeo visit.

: US targets Chinese and Russian firms over DPRK sanctions breaches.

Aug. 9, 2018; DPRK criticizes US sanctions pressure on denuclearization process

: US backs guidelines in UN Security Council for streamlining delivery of humanitarian aid to the DPRK.

: DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho says it is alarming that the US is returning to hostile ways “far from its leaders’ intentions.”

: Pompeo says DPRK weapons work counter to denuclearization pledge; confidential UN report says DPRK has not stopped it nuclear and missile programs.

: White House reports Trump received letter from Kim Jong Un.

: Washington Post reports that US intelligence agencies believe DPRK is working on new missiles.

: Trump thanks Kim for transfer of US war dead remains.

: DPRK hands over 55 boxes of US war dead remains.

: ROK Defense Ministry announces plans to reduce number of guard posts along DMZ.

: Secretary Pompeo and US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley urge strict UN sanction remain in place until DPRK acts on denuclearization.

: US Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats says denuclearization in a year not likely.

: Trump tweets he received “very nice note” from Kim Jong Un; Pompeo says DPRK deal “may take some time” and sanctions to remain in place.

: Pompeo announces that US and DPRK to resume search for war remains.

: US accuses DPRK of UN sanctions breach and demands end to illicit fuel sales.

: Moon says US-DPRK talks are “on track,” dismisses criticism.

: Trump suggests China is interfering in US-DPRK talks.

: DPRK calls US stance “regrettable;” Pompeo urges DPRK to follow Vietnam’s example.

: Secretary Pompeo meets Kim Yong Chol in Pyongyang to “clarify” and says progress made; DPRK condemns US tactics as “gangster-like” after Pompeo’s departure.

: Wall Street Journal reports Middlebury Institute imagery shows DPRK expanding key missile manufacturing plant

: US marks departure of military presence in Seoul with opening of new headquarters facilities at Camp Humphreys.

: US intelligence reportedly believes DPRK making more bomb fuel despite talks.

: 38 North website reports that satellite imagery shows infrastructure improvements at DPRK’s Yongbyon nuclear plant.

: Pompeo says DPRK understands US on “complete denuclearization.”

: Pompeo says he won’t put a timeline on DPRK denuclearization.

: Pentagon indefinitely suspends some US training exercises with the ROK.

June 21, 2018; Trump announces DPRK has returned remains of 200 US war dead and that “total denuclearization” has begun; Pompeo plans DPRK meeting at “earliest possible date.”

: ROK Foreign Minister Kang says DPRK sanctions to remain until denuclearization; Kim and Xi discuss “true peace” and denuclearization in Beijing.

June 18, 2018; US and ROK agree to suspend joint military exercises scheduled for August.

: Trump says his agreement with North Korea will be good for China; ROK Blue House says US forces in ROK not subject to US-DPRK talks; Trump says he gave Kim his direct number.

: Gallup poll shows 66 percent of ROK respondents approve of US-DPRK summit outcome.

June 14, 2018; Secretary Pompeo says North Korea sanctions to remain until DPRK completes denuclearization, says US prepared to offer security guarantees.

: Reuters/Ipsos poll says half of Americans polled support Trump’s handling of North Korea.

: Trump-Kim summit held in Singapore. As summit begins, Trump says “we’re going to have a great discussion, and I think tremendous success.” Kim Jong Un says “there were fetters and wrong practices that at times covered out eyes and ears, but we overcame everything to come this far.”

: 38 North website reports DPRK is razing Ilha-ri, a key ballistic missile test site.

: Trump announces summit with Kim is back on, confirms June 12 date.

: Trumps says he expects letter from Kim Jong Un; US and DPRK working groups meet in Singapore, Secretary Pompeo meets Kim Yong Chol in New York City.

: Kim Jong Un says DPRK’s will for denuclearization is “unchanged.”

: Trump says DPRK’s Kim Yong Chol heading to US for talks; White House says Trump is prepared for June summit.

: US team in DPRK for talks on summit, says Trump; ROK says DPRK committed to Trump summit and complete denuclearization, and calls for more impromptu meetings.

: Moon and Kim hold surprise summit in Panmunjom.

: Trump says US in “productive talks” to reinstate summit.

: DPRK carries out demolition of nuclear test site; Trump cancels summit with Kim Jong Un, citing “hostility.”

: Trump blames China for summit problems; DPRK launches tirade against “stupid” US officials, calling Vice President Pence a “political dummy” and threatening to call off summit.

: President Trump meets President Moon at White House; Trump says June summit with Kim should be called off, but suggests it may work out over period of time.

: New York Times reports Trump grappling with risks of Singapore summit; Wall Street Journal reports Moon fighting for Trump-Kim summit.

: DPRK “declines,” then later permits ROK media to attend nuclear test site closure.

: President Trump nominates former Pacific Command commander Harry Harris as US ambassador to ROK.

: DPRK says it won’t hold talks with “incompetent” ROK; Trump says “if we make a deal, I think Kim Jong Un is going to be very, very happy.”

: DPRK says it doesn’t want US summit focused only on denuclearization.

: Satellite images show buildings removed from DPRK nuclear test site.

: DPRK casts doubt on Trump summit, suspends talks with South; Trump says “we’ll see.”

: Secretary Pompeo says US ready to lift sanctions if DPRK dismantles its nuclear weapons program.

: DPRK details plans to dismantle nuclear test site.

: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meets ROK Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha and suggests DPRK future “brimming with prosperity,” though he cautions denuclearization will require “robust” oversight.

: President Trump announces he will meet DPRK leader Kim Jong UN in Singapore on June 12.

: Three US detainees freed by DPRK, head home, thank Trump.

: Kim Jong UN meets Chinese President Xi Jinping.

: Wall Street Journal reports that US troops represent “potential bargaining chip.”

: DPRK denies US sanctions pressure is behind its denuclearization pledge.

: New York Times reports that President Trump has ordered the Pentagon to consider reducing US troops in ROK.

: White House says US prisoner release would be a goodwill move by the DPRK.

: US National Security Advisor John Bolton meets ROK National Security Adviser Chung Eui-yong in Washington, DC.

: ROK says it wants US troops to stay regardless of any treaty with the DPRK.

: US intelligence detects DPRK actions at its nuclear test site.

: South and North begin dismantlement of border speakers in accord with April 27 inter-Korean leaders summit; ROK President Moon Jae-in asks UN for verification of DPRK nuclear site shutdown.

: President Moon suggests that Trump deserves the Nobel Peace Prize. Trump floats Panmunjom or Singapore as possible summit sites with Kim.

: President Moon and DPRK leader Kim meet in Panmunjom. Declaration aims at denuclearization, movement to a peace agreement, and opening of a representative office at the DMZ. White House hails the meeting and goal of denuclearization.

:  South Korean Director of National Security Chung Eui-yong meets National Security Advisor John Bolton in Washington, DC, to exchange ideas.

: President Trump says Kim meeting will be “very soon.” Senior US official states that Pompeo will fill Seoul ambassadorship with former Pacific Commander Adm. Harry Harris, Trump’s proposed ambassador to Australia.

: US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis suggests “reasons for optimism” after DPRK announcement.

: ROK and DPRK install direct hotline between leaders.

: US Deputy Secretary of State Sullivan calls China, Russia, Iran and North Korea “morally reprehensible” on human rights.

: KCNA reports that leader Kim Jong Un will suspend nuclear and ICBM missile tests and close the DPRK’s northern nuclear test site at Pyunggye-ri.

: President Trump expresses hope for talks with Kim. US vows continued pressure, and President Moon states North is seeking “complete denuclearization.”

: President Trump points to Pompeo forming a “good relationship” with Kim. Trump warns he could walk away from summit and that talks are underway for release of Americans held in North Korea.

: President Trump announces US had “extremely high” level talks with North Korea, subsequently revealed to have been between Pompeo and Kim.

: Secretary of State-designate Pompeo reiterates there will be no reward for the DPRK without complete denuclearization.

: ROK National Security Office chief Chung Eui-yong meets US National Security Advisor Bolton in Washington to prepare for summits.

: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un talks about prospects for dialogue with the US, his first official comment on a planned summit with President Trump.

: KCNA reports leader Kim Jong Un assessed US talks at party meeting.

: CIA Director Pompeo visits Pyongyang and meets Kim Jong Un.

: US-ROK joint exercise Foal Eagle starts in Korea.

: UN Security Council announces new sanctions targeting one individual, 21 shipping companies and 27 vessels for helping the DPRK evade sanctions.

: Seoul announces inter-Korean summit between Moon and Kim for April 27. Trump says he may hold up on KORUS trade deal until after the US-DPRK summit meeting.

: Hyundai’s union says revised trade deal with US is “humiliating.” GM says ROK subsidiary will file for bankruptcy if no union concessions by April 20.

: US and ROK reach agreement on trade and steel tariffs.

: Seoul and Washington announce resumption of military exercises, with Foal Eagle slated to start April 1 and Key Resolve beginning in mid-April.

: President Moon says three-way summit with DPRK and US possible.

: H.R. McMaster, US national security adviser, Japan counterpart Yachi Shotaro, and Korean counterpart Chung Eui Yong meet in San Francisco.

: UN report outlines DPRK networks maintaining money flow despite sanctions.

: President Trump speaks with President Moon to discuss efforts to prepare for their upcoming engagements with North Korea.

: Deputy Secretary Sullivan meets South Korea’s Foreign Minister Kang and Japanese Foreign Minister Aso Kono in Washington DC.

: White House acknowledges “caution” in announcing Trump-Kim summit.

: CIA Director Pompeo describes Trump talks with Kim as not “theater.”

: Trump tweets that he believes DPRK “will honor that commitment” to not test and states that talks may lead to the “greatest deal for the world.”

: White House insists on “concrete actions” from DPRK prior to a meeting.

: President Trump agrees to meet Kim Jong Un.

: President Moon cautions that sanctions will remain and suggests it is too early to be optimistic. Trump administration offers support, but remains wary.

: Representatives from US and ROK meet in Honolulu for first round of talks to develop the 10th Special Measures Agreement (SMA), which will enter into force in 2019.

: ROK delegation says DPRK willing to denuclearize. Trump calls North Korea “sincere” on possible talks. Trump tweets that “a serious effort is being made,” and the US is “ready to go hard in either direction.”

: Trump suggests US will meet with DPRK. ROK sends envoys to DPRK as Trump suggests willingness.

: President Moon urges the US to ease way for DPRK talks. US announces senior envoy Ambassador Joseph Yun to retire after Trump rejects talks without preconditions.

: Trump responds “we’ll see” to Seoul push for US-DPRK talks.

: DPRK condemns US sanctions as officials attend Olympic closing ceremonies.

: ROK says US sanctions will bolster UN resolutions. PRC warns that new US sanctions threaten cooperation.

: US Treasury sanctions one person, 27 companies and 28 ships in its largest package aimed at pressuring the DPRK to abandon missile and nuclear programs. Trump warns of a “phase two” that could be “very, very unfortunate.” US pushes for more UN sanctions targeting DPRK oil, coal, and smuggling.

: ROK announces the DPRK will send Gen. Kim Yong Chol to the Olympic closing ceremonies.

: US officials say North Korea canceled Olympic meeting with Vice President Pence. ROK drops denunciations of Kim Jong Un from border broadcasts.

: President Moon describes a difficult road to an inter-Korean summit and the hope for US dialogue with the DPRK.

: US Assistant Secretary of State for Asian and Pacific Affairs Susan Thornton states that there is no US “bloody nose” strategy for the DPRK.

: ROK reports that Kim Jong Un invites ROK President Moon for summit. Pence says allies united in isolating North Korea.

: PyeongChang Games open with senior US delegation alongside ROK President Moon and DPRK delegation nearby. Pence avoids encounter. Protesters burn flags.

: DPRK stages military parade in Pyongyang, displaying new missiles.

: ROK President Moon and Vice President Pence hold bilateral meeting at the Blue House in Seoul.

: Vice President Pence meets North Korean defectors in Seoul and visits Cheonan Memorial.

: DPRK informs the ROK that Kim Yo Jong, younger sister of Kim Jong Un, will join the DPRK Olympic delegation. Vice President Pence in Tokyo states that Washington will levy new sanctions against the planet’s “most tyrannical and oppressive regime.”

: US Ambassador Robert Wood says at UN Conference on Disarmament that DPRK is “only months away” from the capability to strike the US.

: ROK Blue House announces DPRK President of the Supreme People’s Assembly Kim Yong Nam to lead delegation to the PyeongChang Olympic Games.

: ROK says DPRK possible behind hack of Japan’s Coincheck.

: UN reports DPRK violated sanctions to earn $200  million in 2017 from banned commodity exports, as well as to export weapons to Syria and Myanmar.

: DPRK athletes arrive in Seoul for Winter Olympic preparations.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Korea and Japan Joseph Yun travels to Tokyo and Seoul to coordinate on the DPRK and other alliance and bilateral issues.

: President Trump honors DPRK defector Ji Seong-ho in State of the Union Address and acknowledges Otto Warmbier’s parents attendance.

: Vice Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff Selva states that the DPRK has not yet demonstrated all components of an ICBM, including a survivable reentry vehicle.

: White House withdraws nomination of Victor Cha as ambassador to South Korea.

: DPRK sends announcement to all Koreans calling for unification. US announces more sanctions on PRC and DPRK companies.

: US and DRK clash at UN disarmament forum over nuclear weapons.

: ROK President Moon Jae-in states that the Olympics should lead to nuclear talks with the US. Seoul protesters burn images of Kim Jong Un.

: DPRK delegation arrives in Seoul for Olympic preparations.

: US announces satellite imagery of six Chinese vessels violating sanctions against North Korea.

: US and ROK hold second meeting of the Extended Deterrence Strategy and Consultation Group (EDSCG) in Washington, DC.

: Secretary Tillerson suggests that there is evidence that DPRK sanctions are “really starting to hurt.”

: Secretary of State Rex Tillerson announces that 20 nations meeting in Canada agree to consider more sanctions and US warns on military option. DPRK lambasts US on movement of six B-52s to Guam and dismisses Trump’s button size remark as “spasm of a lunatic.”

: DPRK agrees to send orchestra to perform during PyeongChang Games.

: False alert over DPRK missile threat rattles Hawaii.

: ROK President Moon suggests Trump deserves “big” credit for talks. Trump says, “who knows where it leads?”

: DPRK commits to send a team to the PyeongChang Games.

: ROK describes quick trade talks with US as an “uphill battle.” ROK and DPRK begin preparatory talks on Olympics.

: Trump says he would “absolutely” talk to Kim on the phone at the right time.

: Trump credits his firmness for restoration of ROK-DPRK dialogue, describing talks as “a good thing” and announcing US-ROK exercises would not occur during Olympics.

: President Donald Trump says his nuclear button is “bigger” than that of Kim in response to Kim’s claim that he has a “nuclear button” on his desk. DPRK uses the hotline to the ROK for a first time in two years.

: US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley warns the DPRK against staging a missile test. ROK proposes border talks in light of Kim’s overture.

: In his 2018 New Year’s speech, Kim Jong Un repeats nuclear threats against the US, acknowledges the effects of sanctions against North Korea, and, in a major shift, is conciliatory toward South Korea, offering to send a delegation to the PyeongChang Winter Olympics.

: ROK reports the seizure of a second ship suspected of oil transfers.

: Reuters reports that Russian tankers have illicitly supplied fuel to the DPRK via transfers at sea.

: Trump tweets that China was “caught RED HANDED” allowing oil into the DPRK and preventing “a friendly solution” to the conflict with the DPRK. China blocks US effort to blacklist six foreign-flagged ships believed involved in illicit trade. ROK claims ship seizure over illicit petroleum trade with the DPRK.

: US Treasury announces sanctions against two DPRK officials behind ballistic missile program. China is reported to have broken sanctions on the sale of petroleum products to the DPRK with ship transfers.

: ROK Unification Ministry predicts DPRK will look to open talks with the US in 2018 in optimistic New Year forecast.

: DPRK condemns the new UNSC sanctions resolution as an act of war.

: UN Security Council unanimously passes UNSCR 2397 imposing more sanctions on the DPRK.

: A DPRK soldier escapes across the DMZ.

: US states DPRK is responsible for WannaCry cyber attack. ROK President Moon proposes curtailing military exercises to ease pressure around the Olympic Games.

: Secretary Tillerson says DPRK must halt missile and nuclear tests prior to any resumption of dialogue.

: Secretary Mattis says DPRK ICBM is not yet a “capable threat’ against the US. UN Secretary General Guterres urges communication with the DPRK to avoid escalation.

: UN Secretary General Guterres warns against “sleepwalking” into conflict with the DPRK A group of 58 retired US military leaders urge Trump to take a diplomatic approach with North Korea over military action.

: White House says time is not right for talks with the DPRK.

: Secretary Tillerson says US is ready for negotiations with the DPRK without preconditions.

: ROK announces sanctions against 20 DPRK groups and 12 individuals. Seoul asks US to delay spring military exercises until after Pyeongchang Olympics.

: US, ROK, and Japan conduct computer-simulated training to track DPRK missile launches.

: DPRK labels joint ROK-US drills as “confrontational warmongering” and poses the question “when will war break out?”

: Ambassador Haley suggests US participation in Pyeongchang Winter Olympics is an “open question.”

: US B-1B bomber joins joint US-ROK military exercises.

: UN Under Secretary General for Political Affairs Jeffrey Feltman visits North Korea in highest-level UN effort to encourage negotiation since 2011.

: US and ROK conduct Vigilant Ace military exercise.

: Sen. Lindsey Graham suggests Pentagon should move US military dependents from ROK. North Korea says trump is “begging” for nuclear war.

: Trump tweets that North Korean leader Kim, whom he refers to as Little Rocket Man, is a “sick puppy.”

: DPRK tests Hwasong-15 ICBM. ROK stages “precision strike” drill within minutes of the DPRK launch. Trump tells reporters “we will take care of that situation.” Ambassador Haley warns that in the event of war, the DPRK regime will be “utterly destroyed.” Kim Jong Un declares the DPRK has “finally realized the great historic cause of completing the state nuclear force.”

: US Treasury imposes sanctions on 13 PRC and DPRK organizations accused of helping Pyongyang evade nuclear restrictions and supporting trade in commodities.

: US re-designates the DPRK as a state sponsor of terrorism.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Joseph Yun says there has been “no signal” from DPRK for negotiations. DPRK UN Geneva Ambassador Han Tae Song rules out negotiations with the US as long as US-ROK military exercises continue.

: DPRK soldier is shot while attempting to cross the military demarcation line in the Joint Security Area in Panmunjom.

: DPRK says Trump begged for war during his Asia trip. Trump tweets “why would Kim Jong Un insult me by calling me “old,” when I would never call him “short and fat?”

: US conducts military exercises in the Sea of Japan (East Sea) involving three US carrier strike groups.

: Trump addresses ROK National Assembly.

: Following talks with Moon, Trump pledges cooperation and suggests “we cannot allow North Korea to threaten all that we have built.”

: On departure for Seoul, Trump tweets that President Moon is “a fine gentleman” and that “we will figure it all out!”

: Trump suggests “samurai” Japan should shoot DPRK missiles “out of the sky.” ROK imposes sanctions on 18 North Koreans.

: DPRK calls for halt to “brutal” sanctions.

: President Moon says the ROK cannot recognize the DPRK as a nuclear state.

: Secretary Mattis warns that Kim Jong Un is threatening “catastrophe.”

: Defense Secretary Mattis and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford arrive in Seoul for consultations.

: US and ROK conduct a joint naval exercise near South Korea.

: DPRK cautions international community and says “you’re safe” if you don’t join the US in its efforts against the DPRK.  North Korean diplomat says nuclear weapons are a “matter of life and death” for the DPRK.

: North Korea warns that US threats are a “big miscalculation.” CIA Director Mike Pompeo says DPRK “months away” from ability to strike the US.

: South Korean Vice Foreign Minister Lim Sung-nam and US Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan meet in Seoul. Lim also meets Sullivan and Japanese Vice Foreign Minister Shinsuke Sugiyama to coordinate policies on North Korea.

: US Pacific Command’s Adm. Harry Harris warns that the DPRK situation is a “recipe for disaster,” urging China to do more.

: DPRK labels Trump a “strangler of peace.” Secretary Tillerson promises US diplomacy until “first bomb drops.”

: US Navy Strike Group 5, led by USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), participates in a combined exercise with South Korea’s Navy near the Korean Peninsula.

: US flies bombers over Korea as Trump discusses options with military leaders.

: US bans four ships for transporting DPRK coal.

: Trump tweets criticism of past US approaches and that “only one thing will work!” in dealing with North Korea.

: DPRK’s Rodong Sinmum reports Trump’s “intention is to completely destroy the DPRK and exterminate the whole Korean nation.”

: ROK and US announce agreement to amend the KORUS FTA.

: White House rejects talks with DPRK on nuclear issue.

: Secretary Tillerson visits Beijing to press China on DPRK sanctions. He says US is “probing” to see if DPRK interested in dialogue. Trump tweets that North Korea talks are a “waste of time.”

: Trump states US is prepared to use “devastating” force on DPRK.

: North Korea says US “declared war” and threatens to shoot down US bombers.

: US sends bombers on flyover near the Korean coastline.

: DPRK envoy warns attack on US is becoming “inevitable.”

: Trump labels Kim Jong Un a “madman.”

: Foreign Minister Ri warns of a potential DPRK nuclear test over the Pacific. Kim Jong Un labels Trump a “mentally deranged US dotard.”

: DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho dismisses Trump’s UN address as the “sound of a dog barking.”

: UN Secretary General Guterres appeals for statesmanship to avoid war in Korea. Trump warns UN General Assembly that US may have to “totally destroy” the DPRK if threatened, and that “Rocket Man” Kim Jong Un is on a “suicide mission.”

: Two B-1B bombers and four F-35 fighters join ROK and Japanese jets in air maneuvers. Defense Secretary Mattis hints at military options against the DPRK.

: Secretary of State Rex Tillerson vows “peaceful pressure campaign” and suggests that “if our diplomatic efforts fall through, our military option will be the only one left.” US Ambassador Haley states that the UN has exhausted options on the DPRK.

: DPRK states it is seeking military “equilibrium” with US.

: US National Security Advisor Gen. H.R. McMaster warns that “we’re out of time” with North Korea.

: DPRK threatens to “sink” Japan and reduce US to “ashes and darkness.” DPRK fires missile over Japan, the second in one month.

: DPRK vows to accelerate nuclear program.

: North Korea warns US of “greatest pain” in the event of new sanctions. UN Security Council passes UNSCR 2375, tightening existing sanctions.

: DPRK leader Kim Jong Un praises nuclear scientists with celebration. DPRK warns that the US will pay a price for spearheading sanctions resolution in the UN.

: Trump says he won’t rule out military action against the DPRK. North Korea dismisses US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley’s “hysteric fit.”

: Trump suggests military force against the DPRK is not his “first choice,” although the US is “not putting up” with DPRK actions.

: North Korea warns of “gift packages” for the US.

: US and ROK announce exercises in response to DPRK nuclear test.

: North Korea conducts its sixth nuclear weapon test.

: DPRK conducts its sixth nuclear test, which is of exponentially higher yield than the September 2016 test.

: US and ROK agree to revise a missile treaty that will allow the ROK to develop missiles with longer ranges.

: President Donald Trump speaks with ROK President Moon Jae-in by phone.

: President Trump tweets “talking is not the answer!,” although Defense Secretary Mattis cautions afterward that “we are never out of diplomatic solutions.”

: The Wall Street Journal reports that “Korea passing” has entered South Korea’s public and leadership lexicon, as Seoul appears bypassed in the standoff with North Korea.

: DPRK accuses the US of driving the Korean Peninsula to “explosion.” US proposes a UNSC statement condemning the latest DPRK launch and that all states “strictly, fully and expeditiously implement” sanctions. Kim Jong Un says missile test was for Guam.

: DPRK fires Hwasong-12 missile over Japan. Trump warns again that “all options are on the table,” and that the DPRK message is “loud and clear.”

: DPRK fires three short-range missiles from its east coast; one fails.

: Russia sends nuclear-capable bombers near South Korea and Japan. DPRK photos suggest a more powerful ICBM under development.

: President Trump suggests Kim Jong Un is “starting to respect” the US.

: North Korea threatens “absolute force” in response to UFG exercises. US Treasury targets Chinese and Russian entities for helping DPRK weapons development.

: ROK and US Combined Forces Command conduct the annual Ulchi Freedom Guardian military exercise. In addition, UN Command forces from seven countries, including Australia, Canada, Columbia, Denmark, New Zealand, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom, participate.

: President Trump praises Kim Jong Un for a “wise’ decision on Guam.

: President Moon warns the US against unilateral military action.

: DPRK delays Guam firing and US says that dialogue is up to Kim Jong Un. Defense Secretary Mattis says that if DPRK fires at the US, it could “escalate into war.”

: CIA Director Pompeo suggests DPRK likely to continue tests. US Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joseph Dunford arrives in Asia and pushes diplomacy.

: Trump tweets that military solutions are “locked and loaded.”

: DPRK suggests it might fire missile into waters off Guam. Trump says his earlier comments might not have been “tough enough” and warns North Korea to get its “act together.”

: Secretary Tillerson states, “I do not believe there is any imminent threat,” from the DPRK, and that “Americans should sleep well at night.”

: DPRK states it is now making missile-ready nuclear weapons. Trump says US will meet DPRK threat with “fire and fury.” DPRK announces consideration of a plan to strike Guam. Former Defense Secretary Perry tweets that “nuclear deterrence is only effective if threats are deemed credible; bluster hurts our national security posture.”

: ROK and US agree to increase pressure on the DPRK. North Korea says it would use nuclear weapons only against the US. DPRK rejects nuclear talks and says US will “pay dearly.” China urges restraint.

: UN bans key DPRK exports over missile tests with 15-0 passage of UNSC resolution 2371. Chinese media stresses limits and condemns US “arrogance.”

: DPRK condemns US travel ban as a “sordid” limit on exchanges.

: National security advisers from the US, South Korea, and Japan hold a video conference to coordinate their response to North Korea’s missile and nuclear threats.

: Vice President Mike Pence says US won’t hold talks with North Korea. US bans travel to North Korea from Sept. 1, and advises all US citizens to leave the DPRK.

: Secretary of State Tillerson says to North Korea, “we are not your enemy,” expresses hope for dialogue “at some point,” and plays down talk of regime change.

: US flies bombers over Korean Peninsula. DPRK claims the entire US is within strike range of the Hwasong 14. Trump says China has done “nothing.”

: DPRK tests a second ICBM, the Hwasong 14, off its east coast. ROK pushes to build up its own missile defenses. Trump tweets disappointment in China.

: US intelligence agencies report that within one year the DPRK could have a missile that can reach US.

: US legislators strike deal on sanctions bill for Russia, Iran, and North Korea.

: US State Department announces a ban on US travel to the DPRK.

: Vice Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff Paul Selva suggests DPRK lacks accuracy to hit US. DPRK dismisses ROK call for better ties as “nonsense.” US Navy chief asks PRC counterpart for help on DPRK.

: ROK proposes military talks, family visits, and opening of hotlines with DPRK.

: DPRK vows “corresponding measures” if UN adopts new sanctions.

: ROK prefers slow approach to KORUS FTA revisions. US prepares new sanctions on Chinese firms over DPRK ties.

: ROK contends that DPRK does not have ICBM reentry technology.

: US seeks funds connected to DPRK from eight large banks. President Moon delivers historic Berlin address on unification at the Korber Foundation.

: US bombers conduct drill in South Korea. A North Korean ship raises weapons at a Japanese patrol boat.

: China urges calm, while President Trump considers “severe things” over DPRK threat. Russia objects to UN condemnation and suggests the missile test was not of an ICBM.

:   US and South Korea conduct military exercise that is described as a response to the North Korean missile launch on July 4.

: US tells North Korea it is prepared to go to war. UNSC holds emergency session.

: North Korea tests an ICBM using a PRC truck as a launch base and claims the ICBM can carry a large nuclear warhead. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson calls for global action.

: President Trump calls Prime Minister Abe and President Xi over DPRK threat.

: US head of missile defense states, “I would not say we are comfortably ahead of the threat” from the DPRK.

: Presidents Trump and Moon meet. Trump calls for firm response on North Korea and targets ROK on trade. The two presidents assert unity against DPRK provocations.

: Former Defense Secretary Perry and former senior officials urge Trump to begin dialogue with North Korea.

: White House announces Trump will press Moon at summit on trade deficits in steel and automobiles. US announces sanction of Chinese bank and individuals over DPRK financing.

: Samsung announces investment in a South Carolina factory ahead of presidential summit in Washington.

: Defense Secretary Mattis meets former ROK Defense Minister Song Young-moo and says US troop commitment in ROK is “ironclad.”

: ROK tests missile capable of striking all the DPRK. President Moon states that he and Trump share a “common goal.”

: President Moon calls Chinese President Xi Jinping to encourage more action on DPRK. Student Otto Warmbier laid to rest in Wyoming, Ohio.

: DPRK tests rocket engine for possible ICBM launch. Japan and US fail to shoot down mock missile in-flight.

: US B-1 bombers fly over the Korean Peninsula. US asks China to do more to rein in North Korea. China presses US to swap exercises for a DPRK freeze.

: Otto Warmbier dies days after release from the DPRK.

: Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Tom Shannon says DPRK poses a global threat over time. US blames DPRK for hacking spree and warns against more attacks.

: Defense Secretary Mattis describes the DPRK as the “most urgent” threat to security. Detained US student Otto Warmbier returns to the US in an unresponsive state.

: DPRK says it is “not far away” from an ICBM test.

: ROK suspends THAAD deployment. Head of US missile defense describes DPRK advances in missile development as being of “great concern.”

: DPRK fires several ground-to-ship missiles, saying the test launch verifies “combat application efficiency.” Kim Jong Un reportedly supervised the launch.

: DPRK rejects new UN sanctions.

: UNSC unanimously adopts resolution 2356 extending the number of DPRK individuals and entities under sanction, to include freezing assets and a travel ban.

: Defense Secretary James Mattis calls on China to do more on the DPRK situation and reassures Asian allies of US commitment.

: President Moon raises concern with visiting Sen. Richard Durbin over US military budget and missile defense.

: Blue House announces ROK Defense Ministry “intentionally dropped” THAAD units in report.

: President Moon orders probe after claims that ROK military was hiding information on US THAAD deployment.

: Department of Defense tests a new anti-missile system over the Pacific.

: DPRK claims its new missile can land within seven meters of target.

: Kim Jong Un observes anti-aircraft weapon and new guidance tests. DPRK launches a missile that lands in waters between Korea and Japan.

: ROK approves civilian contact with DPRK as a goodwill gesture.

: Rep. John Conyers and 63 other Democrats sign a letter urging a diplomatic approach to the DPRK and arguing against any US preventive attack.

: UNSC condemns North Korea’s latest missile test and directs its sanctions committee to redouble its efforts to implement existing sanctions.

: ROK announces US investments in advance of Washington summit.

: DPRK launches a missile from Pukchang. The missile flies 500 km, according to the ROK Joint Chiefs of Staff. DPRK asserts that the test confirmed its warhead guidance system is ready for deployment.

: US, ROK, and Japan call for an emergency session of the UN Security Council to discuss the latest missile launch by North Korea.

: China and South Korea urge an easing of tensions between US and North Korea.

: US Navy moves second carrier near the DPRK.

: ROK suggests reopening communications with the DPRK after its missile launch.

: Prominent nuclear specialist Siegfried Hecker suggests US send special nuclear envoy to North Korea.

: China signals it may back new sanctions after the DPRK missile test.

: DPRK tests missile in the 4,500 km range. The missile travels 700 km for 30 minutes and lands in waters between Korea and Japan.

: Yonhap reports that the DPRK would dialogue with the US under the right terms.

: DPRK sends a letter of protest to the US House of Representatives over new US sanctions.

: President Trump advises President Moon that conditions must be right for dialogue with the DPRK before entering into talks.

: Moon Jae-in inaugurated as president and vows to seek peace with the DPRK.

: Department of Defense suggests DPRK Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) have “important shortfalls.”

: Moon Jae-in elected president of the Republic of Korea.

: North Korea detains US citizen Kim Hak-song of PUST on suspicion of “hostile acts” against the DPRK.

: US House of Representatives approves tighter North Korea sanctions 419-1.

: DPRK accuses the CIA of an assassination plot against Kim Jong Un. The next day it describes the plot as a “biochemical” attack.

: DPRK announces April 22 detention of US citizen Kim Sang-dok, who taught accounting at Pyongyang University of Science and Technology (PUST), for “attempting to subvert the country.”

: DPRK protests flyover of US bombers.

: US deploys drone to Japan for possible surveillance of the DPRK.

: President Donald Trump says he would be “honored” to meet DPRK leader Kim Jong Un “under the right circumstances.”

: US announces THAAD missile defense system in ROK as initially capable.

: Secretary Tillerson addresses the UNSC on North Korean developments. North Korea responds with a failed missile launch.

: Secretary of State Tillerson floats North Korea dialogue idea and suggests regime change is not a US goal.

: White House hosts US senators for top-level briefing on North Korea. US Pacific Command’s Adm. Harry Harris provides House Armed Services Committee testimony.

: North Korea conducts live fire exercise to mark the 85th anniversary of the Korean People’s Army.

: President Trump hosts UNSC diplomats at the White House, urging stronger sanctions and suggesting ‘it’s time to solve the problem.” USS Michigan pays a port call in South Korea in a show of support.

: North Korea says it is prepared to strike a US aircraft carrier.

: Vice President Pence suggests in Sydney that Chinese pressure might provide a chance for peace on the Korean Peninsula. USS Carl Vinson begins exercises with Japanese ships in the western Pacific.

: North Korea arrests US citizen Tony Kim (Kim Sang Dok) of the Pyongyang University of Science and Technology at Pyongyang’s international airport.

: Media reports Chinese and Russian troop movements toward their borders with North Korea. Both Beijing and Moscow deny the reports.

: Vice President Pence signals strong US resolve in Seoul and warns North Korea against further provocations.

: North Korea missile launch fails as Vice President Mike Pence arrives in Seoul.

: Day of the Sun parade in Kim Il Sung Square displays an array of missiles, including a possible ICBM.

: Trump suggests the US is prepared to deal with North Korea without China. US reports indicate that the DPRK has readied a nuclear test site. Japan’s Prime Minister Abe Shinzo tells legislators that DPRK missiles could carry sarin gas. China warns against the use of force.

: President Xi Jinping urges President Trump in a call to move to a peaceful resolution over North Korea. Foreign journalists visiting Pyongyang for the 105th anniversary of the birth of Kim Il Sung are told to prepare for a “big” event – an unveiling of a street.

: President Trumps signals that China will get a better trade deal with the US if it cooperates on North Korea.

: Secretary of State Tillerson and National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster describe the Syria strikes as a warning and the movement of the USS Carl Vinson carrier strike group as motivated by DPRK actions.

: Presidents Trump and Xi discuss North Korea and trade, with the US signaling China’s concern about North Korea’s passing a threshold in nuclear and missile development.

: DPRK fires a missile into the East Sea in advance of the Trump-Xi summit.

: Former President Park Geun-hye is arrested.

: UN broadens its inquiry into DPRK crimes against humanity. North Korea conducts another rocket engine test for possible ICBM use.

: IAEA warns that North Korea has doubled the size of its uranium enrichment facility. US House Resolution 1644 is introduced to expand US sanctions to target front companies and enablers funding the DPRK nuclear program.

: US and China pledge to get the DPRK on a “different course.” The DPRK responds the next day with a test of a new high-thrust rocket engine. Trump tells reporters at Mar a Lago that Kim Jong Un is “acting very, very badly.”

: US Secretary of State Tillerson visits Seoul, suggesting an end to strategic patience and negotiations, and that military options remain on the table. President Trump tweets that North Korea “is behaving very badly,” and that China “has done little to help!”

: ROK Supreme Court votes to uphold the impeachment of Park Geun-hye.

: China proposes that the US and ROK halt joint exercises in exchange  for a North Korean freeze on its nuclear program. Foreign Minister Wang Yi warns of “accelerating trains coming toward each other.”

: US Ambassador to the UN Haley dismisses China’s suggestion of a dual suspension, decries Kim Jong Un as not “rationale” and displaying “unbelievable, irresponsible arrogance,” and emphasizing that “all options are on the table.”

: South Korea receives initial parts of the US THAAD missile defense system.

: SWIFT banking system blocks DPRK banks.

: ROK vows to protect firms against China pressure over THAAD.

: DPRK launches four missiles into the sea off Japan’s northwest coast. The missiles averaged a distance of 1000 km and altitude of 260 km.

: US announces visit by Secretary of State Tillerson to Korea, Japan, and China.

: US and South Korea conduct Foal Eagle joint military exercises.

: US withholds visas for North Korean representatives due to attend talks hosted by the National Committee on American Foreign Policy (NCAFP) on March 1 in New York.

: UN Security Council (UNSC) holds an emergency meeting over the DPRK missile launch; US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley states, “it is time to hold North Korea accountable – not with our words, but with our actions.”

: Kim Jong Nam, elder half-brother of Kim Jong Un, is assassinated at the Kuala Lumpur airport.

: North Korea launches an improved Musudan intermediate-range missile; it flies 500 km, landing in the East Sea (Sea of Japan).

: Defense Secretary Mattis meets ROK Defense Minister Han Min-koo and promises an “effective and overwhelming” response to any North Korean use of nuclear weapons against the US or its allies.

: South Korea Unification Ministry reports North Korea’s Minister of State Security Kim Won Hong has been purged in a further sign of a “crack in the elite.”

: US Defense Secretary-designate James Mattis vows to embrace allies and diplomacy in Senate confirmation hearings.

: China and Russia reportedly agree to “countermeasures” against US THAAD system in South Korea.

: Former Defense Secretary William Perry acknowledges “it is a matter of when, not if, North Korea will have an operational ICBM” and suggests dialogue over military options.

: Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken cautions that “with every passing day, the threat does get more acute” and that “we exercise sustained, comprehensive pressure on North Korea to get it to stop these programs, to come back to the negotiating table, and to engage in good faith on denuclearization.”

: President-elect Donald Trump tweets of North Korea’s imminent ICBM capability that “it won’t happen” and chastises China for not doing more to rein in North Korea.

: North Korean leader Kim Jung Un threatens imminent inter-continental ballistic missile (ICBM) capability in New Year address.

: US-ROK Extended Deterrence Strategy and Consultation Group meets, underscoring America’s “ironclad an unwavering commitment” to ROK defense.

: US hosts US-ROK-Japan Experts meeting on Cybersecurity of Critical Infrastructure addressing malicious cyber activity and coordinated responses.

: UN Security Council holds a session on DPRK human rights abuses, which is dismissed by China as not a “forum for discussing human rights issues, still less for the politicization of such issues.”

: South Korea’s National Assembly votes to impeach President Park Geun-hye.

: North Korea “categorically rejects” heightened sanctions and the latest UNSC resolution.

: UN Security Council Resolution 2321 is adopted. It aims at tougher sanctions to punish North Korea for its September nuclear test.

: United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/US Forces Korea Commander Gen. Vincent Brooks announces THAAD deployment within 8-10 months.

: Deputy Secretary Blinken visits South Korea to discuss strategies to deal with North Korea.

: US Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken visits Japan for fifth round of deputy-level US-Japan-South Korea trilateral consultations.

: DPRK sends a letter to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon condemning the “forced adoption of anti-DPRK” sanctions.

: North Korea fails again to launch an intermediate range Musudan missile.

: South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and Defense Minister Han visit Washington and meet Secretary of State John Kerry and Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter for the fourth US-ROK 2+2 meeting. They agree to establish an “Extended Deterrence Strategy and Consultation Group,” which is described as a US commitment “to defend South Korea through a robust combined defense posture and through extended deterrence, including the US nuclear umbrella, conventional strike and missile defense capabilities.”

: US State Department releases US Relations with North Korea Fact Sheet.

: UN press statement condemns DPRK failed missile test.

: DPRK conducts a failed intermediate-range missile test.

: President Park Geun-hye tells ROK government to prepare for large-scale defections from DPRK, days after a direct appeal to its citizens to flee their country.

: US and ROK conduct Invincible Spirit naval exercises to “strengthen maritime interoperability and tactics, techniques and procedures,” in South Korean waters.

: US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power travels to Japan and South Korea to discuss DPRK nuclear and missile programs and meet North Korean defectors on DPRK to discuss human rights abuses.

: US and South Korean navies conducted a joint exercise near the North Korean maritime border. The exercise marks the first time joint forces conducted naval training in an area closest to North Korea’s maritime border in the East Sea or Sea of Japan.

: Vice President Joseph Biden convenes a trilateral meeting of US, ROK, and Japan health experts to discuss trilateral collaboration on the Cancer Moonshot Initiative, aimed at enhancing research and data sharing on finding a cure for cancer.

: US Secretary of State John Kerry, Japanese Foreign Minister Kishida Fumio, and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se meet in New York to discuss responses to North Korea’s latest nuclear test.

: US Secretary of State John Kerry extends Chuseok (Thanksgiving) greetings to South Korea, noting the strength of the alliance and shared common vision between the peoples of the US and Korea.

: US House Speaker Paul Ryan tells visiting ROK National Assembly members that “strong US-Korea economic and defense ties are critical to the safety and prosperity of both nations.”

: DPRK conducts its fifth nuclear test.

: UNSC condemns DPRK missile launches.

: DPRK launches three ballistic missiles into Japanese territorial waters.

: South Korea’s JoongAng Ilbo reports executions of DPRK Vice Premier and Education Minister Kim Yong Jin and former Agriculture Ministry official Hwang Min.

: US State Department spokesperson John Kirby urges the DPRK to pardon and release US university student Otto Frederick Warmbier “on humanitarian grounds.”

: Seoul-based research organization suggests that North Korea is building a 3,000-ton-class submarine designed to hold four SLBMs, with a goal of completion by October 2017. DPRK Sinpo-class subs carry a single SLBM with a displacement of 2000 tons.

: South Korea and the US-led UNC launch a second joint policing operation of 2016 at the Han River estuary to curb and repel illegal boat activity violating the Korean Armistice Agreement.

: Pyongyang reportedly orders the return of DPRK Ambassador to the UK Hyon Hak Bong following the defection of Thae Yong Ho.

: ROK Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se, Japanese FM Kishida Fumio and China FM Wang Yi meet in Tokyo.

: DPRK launches a KN-11 SLBM from waters off Sinpo. It travels 500km, falling within Japan’s Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ).

: President Park Geun-hye suggests that DPRK elite defections signal “serious cracks” in the DPRK regime.

: ROK and US Combined Forces Command (CFC) conduct annual Ulchi Freedom Guardian military exercise.

: DPRK condemns defector Thae Yong Ho as “human scum who betrayed the fatherland.”

: Seoul announces the defection of the DPRK’s number two diplomat in the UK, Thae Yong Ho, the eighth or ninth diplomatic defections in 2016.

: Japan’s Kyodo News reports that North Korea’s Atomic Energy Institute says the DPRK has resumed plutonium production by reprocessing spent fuel rods and is producing highly enriched uranium on schedule.

: DPRK fires a mid-range Rodong missile from the DPRK’s southwest.

: President Park Geun-hye underscored ROK resolve to deploy THAAD despite domestic and Chinese opposition.

: ASEAN Foreign Ministers Meeting adopts a joint communiqué underscoring ASEAN support for denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

: President Obama issues a presidential proclamation commemorating the National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day.

: Secretary of State John Kerry and ROK Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se attend the 23rd ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF) in Laos.  New DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho makes his debut in Vientiane.

: DPRK launches three missiles from Hwanghae Province, including the short- range Scud and mid-range Rodong, which travel 310-370 miles.

: Vice President Joseph Biden and Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken meet ROK VFM Lim and Japan VFM Sugiyama for trilateral discussions. ROK Special Representative for Korea Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Kim Hong-kyun meets US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Sung Kim.

: ROK Deputy Defense Minister Yoo Jeh-seung announces THAAD deployment to Seoungju. The announcement meets considerable local opposition.

: ROK First Vice Foreign Minister Lim Sung-nam and Japan Vice Foreign Minister Sugiyama Shinsuke meet in Hawaii to discuss enhanced cooperation in response to DPRK provocations.

: North Korea closes the New York communication channel, its only direct diplomatic link to Washington.

: DPRK fails in its test of the Bukguekseong-1, a KN-11 submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM), which explodes at an altitude of only 10km.

: South Korea and the US announce the decision to deploy the Terminal High Area Altitude Defense (THAAD) system to South Korea to protect against the DPRK missile threat.

: UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights names Tomas Ojea Quintana as special rapporteur on human rights in the DPRK beginning Aug. 1.

: State Department and Treasury Department name 11 individuals and entities, including DPRK leader Kim Jong Un, for violations of human rights in accordance with the North Korea Sanctions and Policy Enhancement Act of 2016.

: US, South Korea, and Japan conduct missile warning exercise off the coast of Hawaii.

: DPRK fails in its fifth Musudan intermediate range ballistic missile test of 2016, but succeeds the same day in a sixth test of the Hwasong-10, which flies 400km.

: President Barack Obama extends Executive Order 13466, Continuing Certain Restrictions with Respect to North Korea and North Korean Nationals, which was initiated under President George W. Bush.

: Northeast Asia Cooperation Dialogue (NEACD) meets in Beijing.

: US House Foreign Affairs Committee approves HR 5484, the State Sponsors of Terrorism Review Enhancement Act, which increases the period a designated country must refrain from sponsoring terrorism from six to 24 months. HR 5208, the North Korea State Sponsor of Terrorism Designation Act of 2016, mandates that the State Department report to Capitol Hill on the DPRK’s designation.

: USS Mississippi, a fast-attack submarine, visits the ROK Fleet base in Busan to signal strength in the alliance and expand naval cooperation.

: US-Korea Institute at SAIS issues a report, No Man’s Land: The Future of US Policy toward North Korea.

: US Defense Secretary Ash Carter delivers a keynote at the Shangri-La Dialogue (15th Asia Security Summit) in Singapore, attended by ROK Defense Minister Han Min-koo. The two meet Japan Defense Minister Nakatani Gen on the sidelines.

: US Ambassador to the Republic of Korea Mark Lippert addresses the Institute for Global Economics on Allies in Business: The Future of the US-ROK Economic Relationship.

: US Treasury Department classifies North Korea as a primary money laundering concern under Section 311 of the Patriot Act.

: DPRK fails in its fourth test in 2016 of the Hwasong-10 intermediate-range ballistic missile.

: Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) introduces an amendment to the FY 2017 National Defense Authorization Act, calling for Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system deployment to the ROK.

: Ninth round of the South Korea-US Integrated Defense Dialogue (KIDD) is held in Washington, led by South Korea’s Deputy Defense Minister for Policy Yoo Jeh-seung and US Assistant Secretary of Defense for Policy David Shear.

: North Korea test-fires a submarine-launched ballistic missile. Though traveling only 150 meters, the missile signals advances in DPRK technology.

: DPRK holds its Seventh Workers’ Party Congress, the first since 1980, further solidifying Kim Jong Un’s leadership.

: US Congressional Research Service releases a comprehensive report on US-South Korea Relations.

: US and ROK conduct the Key Resolve and Foal Eagle combined exercises. Command post exercise Key Resolve runs March 7-18.

: DPRK conducts a submarine-launched ballistic missile launch off its east coast.

: DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Su Yong proposes in an interview a halt to DPRK testing in exchange for a curtailment of US-ROK military exercises.

: Incoming UNC/CFC/USFK Commander Gen. Brooks defends the cost effectiveness of stationing troops in Korea in Congressional testimony.

: DPRK intermediate-range missile launch fails on the anniversary of Kim Il Sung’s birth.

: US and ROK hold a first meeting of the High-Level Bilateral Commission on Nuclear Energy, chaired by ROK Foreign Affairs Vice Minister Cho Tae-yul and Deputy Secretary of Energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall.

: President Park and ruling Saenuri party lose seats in the National Assembly elections. The opposition parties gain seats and mandates.

: US and ROK Marine Corps share in the enlarged Ssang Yong 2016 military exercises, a biennial amphibious landing drill.

: US Ambassador for North Korean Human Rights Robert King visits Korea, urging consideration of all human rights violators in the DPRK regime.

: President Obama and President Park attend the fourth and final Nuclear Security Summit (NSS) in Washington. They meet Prime Minister Abe on the sidelines.

: State Department releases a fact sheet offering US support and co-sponsorship of the UNHRC resolution on DPRK human rights.

: The Blue House holds an ad-hoc emergency National Security Council session to address inter-Korean tensions resulting from photos in the DPRK’s Rodong Sinmun of bombing drills targeting key Seoul facilities.

: UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) adopts a resolution on DPRK human rights, renewing the mandate of the special rapporteur and calling for a panel of independent experts to recommend mechanisms of accountability for the victims and ICC.

: Defense Secretary Carter announces the nomination of US Army Pacific Commander Gen. Vincent Brooks to replace Gen. Scaparrotti as UNC/CFC/USFK commander.

: Special Representative Sung Kim and Sanctions Policy Coordinator Daniel Fried meet Special Representative Kim Hong-kyun in Seoul to address UNSCR 2270, unilateral sanctions, and international coordination on DPRK provocations.

: The White House issues Presidential Executive Order 13722, leveling new sanctions against the DPRK.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Sung Kim and ROK Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Kim Hong-kyun meet in Washington to discuss DPRK nuclear issues.

: US and ROK agree to create a joint working group on THAAD deployment.

: US and ROK launch a High-Level Bilateral Commission on Nuclear Energy in Washington to better coordinate nuclear cooperation as part of the new 123 Agreement.

: Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se delivers a keynote address to the UN Human Rights Council, underscoring cooperation against DPRK human rights abuses.

: UNSC unanimously adopts Resolution 2270, the strongest sanctions yet imposed on the DPRK.

: Assistant Secretary of State for Asian and Pacific Affairs Daniel Russel meets Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and Deputy Minister Kim Hong-kyun in Seoul to discuss DPRK provocations and bilateral and regional issues.

: Commander, US Pacific Command Adm. Harry Harris and UNC/CFC/USFK Commander Gen. Scaparrotti provide Congressional testimony on DPRK provocations.

: US Naval Forces Korea opens new headquarters in Busan, following relocation from Yongsan.

: President Obama signs HR 757, the North Korea Sanctions and Policy Enhancement Act, into law.

: Deputy Secretary of State Blinken and ROK Deputy National Security Advisor Cho Tae-yong meet in Washington to discuss North Korea provocations.

: President Park addresses the National Assembly on the shift to a hardline policy against North Korea, including the Kaesong shutdown.

: US State Department Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs releases a Fact Sheet on US Relations with North Korea.

: Gen. Joseph Dunford, Gen. Lee Sun-jin (remote) and Adm. Kawano Katsutoshi address measures to counter the DPRK threat, such as trilateral intelligence sharing.

: US Senate passes HR 757 (North Korea Sanctions and Policy Enhancement Act of 2016) with a 96-0 vote, aimed at the DPRK’s nuclear development, human rights violations, and cyber threat.

: President Park announces the closure of the Kaesong Industrial Complex.

: Presidents Park Geun-hye and Barack Obama and then Prime Minister Abe Shinzo discuss the DPRK’s satellite launch by phone.

: US Director of National Intelligence James Clapper confirms the DPRK has facilities capable of uranium enrichment and a plutonium production facility at Yongbyon, which was shuttered in 2007.  He cautions that plutonium could be reprocessed in weeks to months.

: Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se meets in New York with UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and Secretary of State Kerry on a stricter UN resolution against the DPRK.

: UN Security Council meets and strongly condemns DPRK launch.

: North Korea launches a satellite, the Kwangmyongsong-4, in violation of UN missile bans.

: US Undersecretary for Political Affairs-designate Thomas Shannon visits the DMZ and holds bilateral discussions on the ROK-US alliance, global cooperation, and North Korea policy.

: US Secretary of State John Kerry meets Chinese President Xi Jinping and Foreign Minister Wang Yi to discuss the North Korean nuclear test and a UN Security Council sanctions resolution.

: Defense Minister Han Min-koo describes THAAD deployment as a military necessity, a shift forward from the ROK’s prior wavering.

: Deputy Secretary of State Blinken meets ROK Foreign Affairs Minister Yun Byung-se and ROK Defense Minister Han Min-koo in Seoul, calling on China to play an “active leadership” role on DPRK nuclear concerns.

: ROK Foreign Affairs Deputy Minister Shin Dong-ik meets UN ambassadors from the US, China, Japan, UK, and other permanent and nonpermanent UNSC member nations.

: US Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken meets ROK Foreign Affairs Vice Minister Lim Sung-nam and Japanese Foreign Affairs Vice Minister Saiki Akitaka in Tokyo to discuss trilateral cooperation in response to the DPRK nuclear test and other issues.

: The US Congressional Research Service releases its report, North Korea-US Relations, Nuclear Diplomacy and the Internal Situation.

: ROK President Park Geun-hye addresses the public on the North Korean threat after the nuclear test and calls for enhancements in ROK-US defense readiness, to include consideration of the US Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system.

: North Korea conducts a fourth nuclear test of what is claims is a hydrogen bomb. Analysts dismiss the likelihood of a thermonuclear device.

: North Korea claims to have successfully tested a hydrogen bomb.

: DPRK leader Kim Jong Un offers a New Year address promising war against “invasive” outsiders, but withholding mention of DPRK nuclear development.

: DPRK leader Kim Jong Un offers a New Year address promising war against “invasive” outsiders, but withholding mention of DPRK nuclear development.

: South Korea and Japan announce a surprise agreement on “comfort women,” to include an apology and official fund for victims. PM Abe calls President Park with a “sincere apology.” National Security Advisor Susan Rice offers strong US support.

: US and ROK hold the fifth high-level Disarmament and Nonproliferation Consultation meeting in Washington, DC.

: ROK and Japan hold a second round of working-level talks in as many months aimed at resolving the “comfort women” issue.

: Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) releases a discussion paper on Unified Korea and the Future of the US-South Korea Alliance.

: UN Security Council addresses DPRK human rights abuses, with December president US Ambassador Samantha Power urging referral of the DPRK to the International Criminal Court.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Sung Kim hosts a trilateral meeting in Washington with ROK Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Hwang Joon-kook and Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs Director-General for Asian and Oceanian Affairs Ishikane Kimihiro.

: President Park and PM Abe meet at the Blue House.

: US and ROK hold the 47th Security Consultative Meeting (SCM) in Seoul.

: Defense Secretary Carter and ROK Defense Minister Han Min-koo visit the DMZ. US and ROK Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairs Gen. Joseph Dunford and Gen. Lee Sun-jin hold the annual ROK-US Military Committee Meeting (MCM).

: South Korea-Japan-China Trilateral Summit is held at the Blue House.

: ROK Navy holds a fleet review in Busan, with participation by the US aircraft carrier the USS Ronald Reagan.

: President Park names Kim Kyou-hyun senior secretary to the president for foreign affairs and security and Cho Tae-yong first deputy director of national security.

: President Park visits Washington for a summit with President Barack Obama. A Joint Statement condemns North Korea’s nuclear development and human rights abuses.

: DPRK marks the 70th anniversary of the Korean Workers Party.

: Congressional Research Service (CRS) issues report on US-South Korea Relations.

: US Senate Foreign Relations Committee Subcommittee on East Asia, the Pacific and International Cyber security hosts testimony on Assessing the North Korea Threat and US Policy: Strategic Patience for Effective Deterrence?

: Harvard’s Korea Institute hosts former US ambassadors to Korea Stephen Bosworth, Kathleen Stephens, and Sung Kim at the 10th Kim Koo Foundation Forum.

: US Secretary of State John Kerry, ROK Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se, and Japanese Foreign Minister Kishida Fumio meet on the sidelines of the UNGA.

: DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Su Yong attends the 70th session of the UN General Assembly (UNGA).

: President Park visits New York to deliver four addresses at the UN, including a keynote on the 70th anniversary of the UN General Assembly and speeches on health and rural development. Park meets with Japanese Prime Minister Abe Shinzo on the sidelines and hosts a dinner for individuals from New York-based nongovernmental organizations.

: CNN interviews DPRK scientists at Pyongyang’s General Satellite Control Center.

: US and ROK conduct ninth Korea-US Integrated Defense Dialogue (KIDD) in Seoul.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Sung Kim visits South Korea.

: US and ROK Marines conduct combined exercises in northern Gyeonggi Province.

: ROK President Park Geun-hye attends a bilateral meeting in Beijing and is featured alongside Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin at a military parade marking the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II.

: US detainees in North Korea provide brief news conferences appealing for increased US government efforts to win their freedom. The family of US missionary Kenneth Bae expresses increased concern over his health.

: Defense Secretary Ashton Carter cautions that “Korea is the single place in the world where war could erupt at the snap of our fingers” and strongly warns North Korea against provocations.

: ROK and DPRK reach a six-point agreement after an intense several days of negotiation. Washington describes the situation as a “very tense several days.”

: The ROK and DPRK begin negotiations to resolve tensions in the DMZ at 6PM, past the DPRK threatened deadline.

: DPRK and ROK exchange live-fire, with the KPA firing rockets in the direction of ROK loudspeakers, and the ROK responding with 155mm shells. The DPRK sets a 4PM Aug. 22 deadline for the ROK to silence the speakers.

: US and ROK engage in annual Ulchi Freedom Guardian military exercises.

: South Korea marks 70th Anniversary of Korean Liberation Day following the end of World War II.

: US and ROK begin large-scale joint exercises at the ROK Army training camp at Pocheon, Gyeongii Province. The live-fire exercises display combat readiness against DPRK provocations and last the month.

: The ROK resumes loudspeaker broadcasts along the DMZ after an 11-year hiatus following the Aug. 4 maiming of two soldiers by DPRK landmines.

: North Korea announces it will set its clocks back one half hour beginning Aug. 15 as a marker of Liberation Day.

: Kim Dae Jung’s widow, Lee Hee-ho, visits a DPRK hospital, orphanage and maternity clinic, but does not meet neither Kim Jong Un or senior DPRK officials.

: Two ROK soldiers maimed by DPRK landmines in the southern part of the DMZ.

: ROK Defense Agency for Technology and Quality announces deployment of the Chunmoo multiple launch rocket system (MLRS) near the DMZ, doubling the range of the Kooryong MLRS antecedents.

: US House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce (R-CA) and Representative Eliot Engel (D-NY) introduce House Joint Resolution 63 in support of the US-ROK Agreement for Civil Nuclear Cooperation.

: US Senate Foreign Relations Committee Ranking Member Benjamin Cardin (D-MD) introduces Senate Joint Resolution 20 in support of the US-ROK Agreement for Civil Nuclear Cooperation.

: US Special Envoy for the Six-Party Talks Sydney Seiler meets in Seoul with ROK counterparts on North Korean denuclearization, as well as Director General for North Korean Nuclear Affairs Kim Gunn and Japanese Deputy Director General for Asian and Oceanian Affairs Takizaki Shigeki in a US-Korea-Japan trilateral session.

: ROK media reports DPRK completion of its Sohae Satellite Launch Facility, designed as a long-range ballistic missile and space booster test facility, near the Chinese border.

: US Congressional Research Service (CRS) releases its report on North Korea: US Relations, Nuclear Diplomacy and the Internal Situation.

: US Pacific Fleet Commander Adm. Scott Swift visits the ROK for meetings with ROK Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Choi Yoon-hee, ROK Navy Chief of Staff Adm. Jung Ho-sup, and US Ambassador Mark Lippert.

: ROK Foreign Ministry’s Director General of the North American Affairs Division Shin Jae-hyun and USFK Deputy Commander Lt. Gen. O’Shaughnessy address the delivery of live anthrax spores to a USFK base in April in a SOFA Joint Committee session. The Seoul-Washington Joint Working Group also discusses the joint investigation into the incident.

: Seoul hosts a two-day meeting for officials and experts from the US, ROK, and Asia Pacific engaged in the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI), which aims to curtail the illicit transfer of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and related materials.

: Senators Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Robert Menendez (D-NJ) introduce Senate Resolution 1747 to increase sanctions enforcement on and humanitarian organization efforts toward the DPRK.

: US Assistant Secretary of State for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance Frank Rose meets the ROK Ministry of Foreign Affairs North American Affairs head Shin Jae-hyun and International Organizations Department head Yoo Dae-jong for discussion on arms reduction, nonproliferation, and space.

: US Special Envoy for North Korean Policy Sung Kim visits Korea, meeting Deputy Foreign Minister Kim Hong-kyun and Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Hwang Joon-kook.

: Citing an increasing DPRK threat and budgetary constraints, the ROK Defense Ministry announces a delay in the reduction of active-duty personnel, reducing troop levels from 630,000 to 526,200 by 2030, rather than 2022.

: ROK signs Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank articles, becoming the fifth largest shareholder with a 3.81 percent stake and 3.5 percent voting bloc. Media reports US opposition to Korea’s opting for the AIIB, but US officials voice support suggesting Korea will promote good governance and best practices.

: ROK Foreign Ministry announces sanctions against half a dozen Taiwanese and Syrian individuals and entities engaged in the DPRK weapons trade.

: US and ROK mark the 65th anniversary of the start of the Korean War.

: President Obama sends a letter to Capitol Hill extending executive orders imposing sanctions on the DPRK.

: UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, alongside Foreign Minister Yun, formally opens Seoul office to monitor and document North Korean human rights abuses.

: US Strategic Command Commander Adm. Cecil Haney visits Seoul and meets ROK Defense Minister Han Min-koo and Joint Chiefs of Staff Choi Yun-hee.

: South Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC) announces investigation of Citi, JP Morgan, Bank of America and three UK lenders on possible collusion to manipulate foreign exchange rates. US and UK fined six banks $5.6 billion in May for exchange rate manipulation.

: President Obama sends the new US-ROK Agreement for Civil Nuclear Cooperation to Congress for review for 90 days of the Hill session.

: North Korea test fires anti-ship rockets, with leader Kim Jong Un in attendance.

: Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz formally sign the revision of the 1974 Civil Nuclear Energy Cooperation Agreement, agreed to April 22

: DPRK launches three KN-01 short-range (120 km) missiles in the East Sea off Wonson.

: President Park announces postponement of her June 14-17 visit to the US given the MERS outbreak. President Obama offers condolences in a phone conversation two days later.

: US Pacific Command Commander Adm. Harry Harris visits Seoul and meets President Park and other senior officials; he also visits the Cheonan memorial at Pyeongtaek.

: US State Department releases report acknowledging possible unidentified nuclear facilities in the DPRK.

: South Korean Trade Minister Yoon Sang-jick and Chinese Trade Minister Gao Hucheng sign a bilateral FTA, eliminating tariffs on more than 90 percent of traded goods over two decades and increasing bilateral trade to over $300 billion per annum. Some US analysts see the move as an affront to the US-led Trans-Pacific Partnership initiative.

: US notifies the ROK of the extension of the US Visa Waiver Program  until March 2017, allowing Korean citizens to visit the US without obtaining a visa for 90 days.

: Blue House announces June 14-17 visit by Park Geun-hye to Washington, DC and Houston. The Obama-Park meeting since has been rescheduled to mid-October 2015.

: The New York City-based Korea Society hosts an expert session on Unification and Alliance Support, providing an update on Seoul’s unification policy and encouraging greater US and Japanese cooperation.

: Pyongyang declares miniaturization capability, advancing US and ROK concerns about missile and nuclear development.

: US Senate Subcommittee Chairman on East Asia, Pacific and International Cybersecurity Policy Cory Gardner (R-CO) introduces a resolution recognizing the DPRK as a serious threat to US national security.

: United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki Moon begins a five-day visit to Korea, participating in the World Education Forum and meeting President Park, Foreign Minister Yun and National Assembly Speaker Chung Eui-hwa. North Korea rejects Ban’s proposed visit to the Kaesong Industrial Complex.

: US Secretary of State John Kerry meets ROK President Park Geun-hye and Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se in advance of the US-ROK presidential summit, which was subsequently rescheduled to Oct. 2015.

: Arbitration begins between the Korean government and US-based private equity fund Lone Star at the International Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes in Washington, DC – the first investor-state dispute filed under the KORUS Free Trade Agreement (FTA).

: ROK Defense Ministry identifies photographs of a May 9 DPRK missile launch from the sea as authentic and describes the DPRK’s developing submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs) as “very serious and concerning.”

: Google opens a start-up and entrepreneurs campus in Seoul. President Park Geun-hye expresses gratitude to Google for selecting Seoul for its first Asian campus.

: Special Representatives Hwang Joon-kook and Sung Kim discuss the Six-Party Talks and denuclearization in Washington.

: Annual US-ROK military exercise Foal Eagle takes place in the ROK.

: US and ROK announce a new agreement on the civil nuclear relationship.

: The Wall Street Journal reports top Chinese nuclear experts estimate that the DPRK may have 20 warheads and may double that by 2016, with an ability to produce as many as 10 more annually. This exceeds most US estimates.

:   US, ROK and Japan hold Defense Trilateral Talks (DTT) in Washington.

: Korea-US Integrated Defense Dialogue (KIDD) is held in Washington.

: US Secretary of Defense Carter visits South Korea and meets Minister of National Defense Han Min-koo and visits the ROK Navy’s 2nd Fleet Command to honor those lost in the 2010 sinking of the Cheonan.

: NORAD and US Northern Command Commander Adm. William Gortney raises concerns about DPRK nuclear and missile advances.

: DPRK declares a no-sail, no fly zone in the East Sea, but fails to notify the International Maritime Organization (IMO), as it has in the past.

: US House of Representatives delegation visits the ROK. The group meets the ROK president, deputy prime minister, minister of strategy and finance, foreign minister and National Assembly speaker.

: North Korea fires five short-range KN-02 missiles with a range of 140 km.

: South Korea announces its intention to join the PRC-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), despite US concerns.

: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey visits Korea.

: DPRK Ambassador to the UK Hyun Hak Bong warns of DPRK capabilities to respond with nuclear missiles “any time,” if attacked by nuclear weapons.

: US Department of Treasury Financial Crimes Enforcement Network issues an update of nations, including North Korea, that fail to comply with the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorist Financing standards, mandating that US financial systems respond.

: ROK and US mark the third anniversary of implementation of the Korea-US Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA). Trade continues to grow, with total volume at an all-time high of $145.2 billion, up from $126.5 billion in 2011.

: Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Daniel Russel visits Seoul and meets Deputy Foreign Minister Lee Kyung-soo, Vice Foreign Minister Cho Tae-yong, and senior Blue House officials to discuss a summer Obama-Park summit.

: DPRK launches seven ground-to-air missiles into the sea off its eastern coast.

: US Ambassador to the ROK Mark Lippert is attacked by a knife-wielding extremist in Seoul. As Lippert recovers, Koreans demonstrate strong support for him.

: DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Su Yong warns in Geneva that North Korea has the power to deter an “ever-increasing nuclear threat” by the US with a preemptive strike.

: North Korea fires two Scud-C or Scud-D-type missiles from Nampo some three hundred miles over the peninsula and into the East Sea.

: Annual US-ROK military exercise Key Resolve takes place in South Korea.

: UN Human Rights Council convenes its 28th regular session in Geneva. ROK Vice Foreign Minister Cho Tae-yul delivers a March 3 keynote at the high-level segment.

: A conference co-hosted by CSIS marks the one year anniversary of the UN Commission of Inquiry Report on North Korean human rights violations, eliciting strong condemnation from the DPRK Mission to the United Nations.

: Korea Institute for Defense Analysis hosts fourth annual US-ROK tabletop exercise, with US Deputy Assistant Secretaries of Defense Elaine Bunn and David Helvey and ROK Deputy Minister for National Defense Policy Ryu Je-seung leading the delegations.

: North Korea launches fives missiles with a range of 200km into the East Sea.

: US Deputy Secretary of State Anthony Blinken visits South Korea, meeting First Vice Minister Cho Tae-yong and Defense Minister Han Min-koo.

: US Secretary of State John Kerry and ROK Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se meet on the sidelines of the 51st Munich Security Conference to discuss the US-ROK Civil Nuclear Cooperation Agreement, North Korea, Northeast Asia tensions, and global issues.

: US State Department issues its latest fact sheet on US-South Korea relations, which are described as a “deep, comprehensive global partnership.”

: In confirmation hearings, Defense Secretary-designate Ashton Carter describes the DPRK as “one of the most intractable security problems for the United States and our allies.”

: UN Food and Agriculture Organization releases its assessment of North Korea, showing that DPRK food production remained steady in 2014, contrary to the hopes of some US experts that sanctions might check economic progress and force denuclearization.

: ROK Deputy Minister for Multilateral and Global Affairs Shin Dong-ik and US Undersecretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Rose Gottemoeller lead the 2015 ROK-US Disarmament and Nonproliferation Consultation in Seoul.

: US Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman meets ROK Foreign Affairs Minister Yun Byung-se in Seoul to discuss bilateral cooperation on regional and global security.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Sung Kim visits Tokyo and Seoul and meets counterparts Junichi Ihara and Hwang Joon-kook to discuss North Korea policy. Sydney Seiler, special envoy for the Six-Party Talks, and National Security Council Director for Korea Allison Hooker joined the Tokyo discussions.

: US Special Envoy for North Korean Human Rights Issues Robert King addresses the European Parliament Subcommittee on Human Rights in Brussels, noting that the DPRK “has few supporters left,” that the UN Commission of Inquiry report was a “critical step,” not an end, and that increasing the flow of information in and out of North Korea is of great importance.

: Ri Yong-ho, North Korea’s chief negotiator for the Six-Party Talks meets former US special envoy for North Korea policy Stephen Bosworth and other US experts in Singapore.

: US and ROK officials launch a new division under Eighth US Army composed of the 2nd Infantry Division and a ROK mechanized infantry brigade. The combined division is under the command of US Maj. Gen. Thomas Vandal and ROK Brig. Gen. Ahn Sung-hwan.

: US State Department spokesperson reiterates US rejection of North Korea’s offer to suspend nuclear tests in exchange for scrapping joint military exercises with South Korea.

: US House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs hosts a briefing on DPRK nuclear, missile, and cyber threats.

Jan. 13, 2015: North Korea offers to hold direct talks with the United States on its proposal to suspend nuclear tests, and says dialogue could pave the way to changes on the Korean Peninsula.

: USS Martin and USS John McCain join Gwanggaeto the Great and several ROK vessels in joint naval exercises.

: ROK President Park Geun-hye’s New Year press conference emphasizes labor, free trade agreement (FTA) benefits, and economic innovation to grow employment and per capita income. On North Korea, Park calls for family reunions and expressed openness to an inter-Korean summit.

: US State Department spokesperson calls North Korea’s offer to suspend nuclear tests as an “implicit threat,” saying it “inappropriately” links routine military exercises between Washington and Seoul to the possibility of a nuclear test.

: North Korea offers to suspend future nuclear tests temporarily if Washington suspends all upcoming military exercises in South Korea and its vicinity.

: US FBI Director James Comey confirms DPRK was responsible for the attacks on Sony Pictures, with hackers “sloppy” in covering their tracks.

: Seoul issues its 2014 Defense White Paper, warning of the “nuclear weapons of North Korea” – a first-time description – and “considerable” advances in warhead technology.

: White House announces a new executive order imposing sanctions on 10 individuals and three companies engaged in DPRK financial activity.

: DPRK leader Kim Jong Un suggests resumption of “highest-level” inter-Korean dialogue in his New Year’s address, receiving a positive, though cautious, response in the ROK.

: DPRK leader Kim Jong Un suggests resumption of “highest-level” inter-Korean dialogue in his New Year address, receiving a positive, though cautious, response in the ROK.

: ROK President Park Geun-hye vows an “actual and detailed” foundation for unification to end the 70-year division of the Peninsula in her New Year’s message.

: DPRK media condemns ROK for support of the UNGA resolution condemning DPRK human rights abuses and promising a “high price.”

: Following the overwhelming UNGA vote, UN undersecretary general for political affairs and assistant secretary general for human rights briefs UNSC members on “The Situation in the DPRK” at Australia’s initiation.

: President Obama blames the DPRK for the cyberattacks on Sony Pictures Entertainment and vows “proportional responses.”

: US Trade Representative Michael Froman and South Korean Trade Minister Yoon Sang-jick convene the third meeting of the KORUS Joint Committee.

: DPRK media condemns US “mulling” UNSC referral of its leadership to the ICC.

: ROK Unification Minister Ryoo Kihl-jae visits New York and Washington, DC.

: ROK Presidential Committee for Unification Preparation delegation led by Vice Chair Chung Chong-wook visits the US.

: Sony Pictures Entertainment in California fall victim to a cyberattack claiming 11 terabytes of data (including several films), with immediate suspicion of North Korea as the provocateur.

: UNGA Third Committee votes 111-19 for passage of a resolution submitting the COI report to the UNSC and urging UNSC referral of DPRK leadership to the International Criminal Court. DPRK threatens to retaliate with a fourth nuclear test.

: North Korea releases US detainees Kenneth Bae and Matthew Todd Miller to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper at the conclusion of a two-day visit.

: Sung Kim is named US special representative for North Korea policy and deputy assistant secretary of state for Korea and Japan.

: Carnegie Middle East Center and Duyeon Kim release Beyond the Politics of the US-South Korea 123 Agreement.

: DPRK offers UN Special Rapporteur Marzuki Darusman the possibility of traveling to North Korea on the sidelines of a UNGA discussion.

: US Special Envoy for the Six-Party Talks Sydney Seiler arrives in Seoul to participate in the first high-level meeting of the Northeast Asia Peace and Cooperation Initiative (NAPCI). Seiler meets ROK Director General for DPRK Nuclear Affairs Shin Chae-hyun.

: Defense Secretary Hagel, Defense Minister Han, Secretary of State Kerry and Foreign Minister Yun affirm the US-ROK bilateral relationship and Mutual Defense Treaty in a third ‘2+2” ministerial meeting.

: Mark Lippert sworn in as the new US ambassador to Korea by Secretary Kerry. Lippert departs for Seoul on Oct. 28.

: The ROK joins the US in not attending China’s newly launched Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) launch. The ROK joining as a founding member was a matter of contention.

: George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas hosts a discussion with North Korean refuges and private sector and public service leaders on ways to improve the human rights situation in the DPRK.

: Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Defense Minister Han Min-koo lead the 46th annual US-ROK Security Consultative Meeting (SCM) in Washington, DC.

: North Korea frees US detainee Jeffrey Fowle.

: US and ROK navies conduct their annual Clear Horizon exercise designed to increase interoperability in mine countermeasures operations. Clear Horizon is one of 20 annual bilateral training exercises aimed at strengthening the alliance.

: DPRK Ambassador to the United Nations Jang Il Hun offers a defense of human rights in North Korea at the Council on Foreign Relations.

: US-ROK Defense Industry Consultative Committee (DICC) conducts its 23rd meeting aimed at developing US-ROK industry dialogue in Arlington, VA.

: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reappears in public after a 40-day absence and with cane in hand visits a new residential district for scientists and the State Academy of Sciences Natural Energy Institute.

: UN opens dialogue on an EU/Japan-led draft resolution on DPRK human rights violations, calling for referral of Kim Jong Un to the International Criminal Court (ICC).

: The Korea Society hosts a forum on New Dynamics on Korea-China-U.S. Relations in Seoul, featuring former Assistant Secretary of State James Kelly and senior Korean, Chinese, and US analysts.

: Warships from the two Koreas exchange warning shots after a North Korean ship briefly violates the disputed Northern Limit Line in the West (Yellow) Sea.

: Assistant Secretary of State Daniel Russel and Assistant Secretary of Defense David Shear meet ROK Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and Deputy Minister for Political Affairs Lee Kyung-soo in Seoul to discuss bilateral affairs and regional issues.

: North Korea’s Hwang Pyong So and two other officials visit South Korea to attend the closing ceremonies of the 17th Asian Games in Incheon. They also meet South Korean Unification Minister Ryoo Kihl-jae and National Security Director Kim Kwan-jin, agreeing to resume high-level North-South dialogue.

: US Special Envoy for Six-Party Talks Sydney Seiler and US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Glyn Davies travel to Seoul, Beijing, and Tokyo.

: In a speech at the UN General Assembly, DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Su Yong states that the DPRK’s nuclear weapons are not a “bargaining chip” and that the Korean nuclear issue will be resolved with termination of the US hostile policy.

: Secretary of State John Kerry participates in a senior-level discussion with heads of state, UN officials, and NGO leaders calling attention to the ongoing, widespread and systematic human rights violations in the DPRK.

: ROK President Park Geun-Hye visits New York for the UN Climate Summit, UNGA Opening, and sideline discussion with NY-based NGO leaders. DPRK Foreign Minister Ri Su Yong attends the UNGA opening, the first such gesture in 15 years.

: ROK and US representatives meet in Vienna to discuss the 123 Civil Nuclear Energy Cooperation Agreement.

: ROK Chief of Office Planning and Coordination Ryu Je-Seung and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for East Asia David Helvey lead the sixth round of the Korea-US Integrated Defense Dialogue (KIDD) to address OPCON transfer.

: DPRK submits its own report on its human rights situation, decrying “hostile forces” as behind the “false nature” of the UN Commission of Inquiry (COI) findings.

: ROK National Security Advisor Kim Kwan-Jin visits Washington and meets counterpart Susan Rice to discuss the Islamic State, missile defense, and OPCON transfer.

: DPRK Supreme Court convicts Californian Matthew Todd Miller of “acts hostile to the DPRK while entering the territory of the DPRK under the guise of a tourist” and sentenced him to six years hard labor.

: ROK Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Hwang Joon-kook arrives in Washington for three days of meetings with US Special Representative of the Secretary of State for North Korea Policy Glyn Davies.

: DPRK fires three short-range missiles off its east coast.

: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un appears at a Pyongyang concert and is not seen again until mid-October.

: UN Security Council Reslolution 1718 DPRK Sanctions Committee meets to consider the mid-term report of its Panel of Experts, with a recommendation that the DPRK’s strategic rocket fire command and its head be subject to sanctions.

: US officials vow to “leave no stone unturned” to free three US citizens held by North Korea.

: Voice of America (VOA) reports an acceleration of the process of identifying US remains from the Korean War, with 49 of 208 boxes containing some 600 remains identified in just the last three years.

: North Korea warns of “military countermeasures” in the face of joint drills between the US and ROK through Deputy Ambassador to the UN Ri Tong Il.

: US approves anti-dumping duties against the ROK and other steel pipe producers; South Korea’s exports to the US exceed all other nations combined.

: 50,000 South Korean and 30,000 US troops take part in Ulchi Freedom Guardian, a computer simulation exercise aimed at evaluating and exercising capabilities in military intelligence, logistics, joint air procedures, and plans and systems, including combined space operations.

: Pope Francis visits South Korea, calling for peace and reconciliation on the Korean Peninsula.

: Secretary of State Kerry delivers an address on the U.S. Vision for the Asia Pacific at the East-West Center in Honolulu.

: US Secretary of State John Kerry, ROK Foreign Minister Yun, and Japanese Foreign Minister Kishida Fumio meet on the sidelines of ASEAN-related meetings in Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar.

: DPRK Deputy UN Ambassador Ri Tong Il addresses a news conference at UN headquarters asking for an emergency meeting of the UNSC to protest ROK-US military exercises. The Security Council rejects the request.

: US Ambassador to Korea Sung Kim receives Seoul Honorary Citizenship.

: Korean War Veterans Association of America and the Embassy of the Republic of Korea share in the 61st National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day ceremonies at Arlington National Cemetery.

: US and South Korea conduct annual naval exercises off the east coast of South Korea. The exercise includes a trilateral search and rescue exercise involving US, South Korean, and Japanese maritime forces.

: North Korea condemns the docking of the USS George Washington in the South Korean port of Busan.

: Chinese President Xi Jinping visits “old friend” President Park Geun-hye, senior officials, the business community, and Seoul National University students in Seoul.

: Following on President Obama’s April visit to South Korea, the Congressional Research Service issues a detailed 36-page report on U.S.-South Korean Relations.

: South Korean First Vice Minister Cho Tae-Yong visits the US to meet Deputy Secretary of State William Burns and other officials to discuss opportunities to further solidify bilateral policy coordination.

: Assistant Secretary of State Daniel Russel speaks to the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington on Assessing Threats Facing the U.S.-Korean Alliance, underscoring the US-ROK “global partnership.”`

: South Korea and the US hold the first in a planned series talks to discuss the transfer of wartime operational command of South Korean troops.

: National Committee on American Foreign Policy hosts a dialogue with Korean, US, Chinese, and Japanese representatives aimed at solution-building on the Korean Peninsula.

: US Ambassador Sung Kim and ROK Ambassador Ahn Ho-young address the Korea Society in New York City on opportunities and challenges in the US-ROK relationship. They underscore economic benefits since implementation of the KORUS FTA.

: The Fifth Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM5) is held in Seoul with officials from Korea, the US, and some 20 states participating or observing to strategize next steps to accelerate deployment of clean and efficient energy.

: ROK Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se addresses UNSC as rotating president. Yun lays the foundation for President Park’s September visit and speaks to the Korea Society on the Korean-U.S. Alliance: Toward the Next Sixty Years.

:   Republic of Korea assumes its second turn at the presidency of the United Nations Security Council in its 24-month term.

: President Obama visits the Republic of Korea.

: Washington hosts the US-Japan-Republic of Korea Defense Trilateral Talks.

: President Obama extends condolences to the families of the victims of the sinking of the ferry Sewol.

: UN Security Council meets to discuss human rights violations outlined in the UN Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in North Korea. Russia and China do not attend.

: USS Bonhomme Richard responds to the sinking of the ferry Sewol near Jindo Island off Korea’s southwest coast.

: Special Envoy for North Korean Human Rights Issues Robert King addresses Ewha Womans University students.

: Washington hosts the US-Japan-Republic of Korea Trilateral Meeting among senior working level representatives.

: South Korea tests 500 km range missile and promises an 800 km range option.

: North Korea fires more than 100 artillery rounds into South Korean waters. South Korea responds with more than 300 rounds into North Korean waters.

: Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, USFK Commander, testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee.

: President Obama hosts President Park and Prime Minister Abe for a trilateral meeting at The Hague, on the sidelines of the Nuclear Security Summit. North Korea launches more short range and mid-range missiles in show of displeasure.

: UN Commission of Inquiry (COI) releases full report on DPRK human rights violations.

: UN Panel Report to the UN Security Council on North Korea Sanctions is released.

: US Department of Defense releases a report to Congress arguing that the execution of Jang Song Thaek will have little impact on Kim Jung Un’s rule or defense policy.

: Korea-US Economic Council holds Board of Directors and Regular Meeting crediting the KORUS FTA for expanding exports.

: US Seventh Fleet’s flagship USS Blue Ridge arrives as part of Key Resolve, and Yonhap reports nuclear submarine USS Columbus arriving in Busan, which USFK did not acknowledge.

: Key Resolve exercises aimed at strengthening ROK-US readiness are held.

: Foal Eagle joint and combined field exercises take place. The DPRK begins a series of missile launches.

: Inter-Korean reunions held at Kumgang-san.

: UN Commission of Inquiry (COI) releases report outline on DPRK human rights violations.

: Secretary of State John Kerry visits Asia with stops in Seoul, Beijing, and Jakarta to meet senior government officials to discuss bilateral, regional, and global issues.

: Congressional Research Service (CRS) releases U.S.-South Korean Relations report.

: South Korea and the US hold their first working-level meeting on cyber security to discuss ways to develop joint cyber warfare capabilities and an emergency response system.

: Arms Control Association releases detailed update of the Chronology of U.S.-North Korean Nuclear and Missile Diplomacy, tracing developments from 1985-2013.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Glyn Davies visits China, South Korea, and Japan to discuss North Korea policy.

: The World Trade Organization (WTO) Dispute Settlement Body establishes a panel on US anti-dumping and countervailing measure on Korean washers.

: US Deputy Secretary of State William Burns visits South Korea, China, and Japan to discuss, bilateral, regional, and global issues.

: North Korea’s Committee for Peaceful Reunification of the Fatherland says that USFK joint military exercises Key Resolve and Foal Eagle drills are tantamount to a declaration of “full-scale nuclear war” and “if carried out, will fatally destroy the inter-Korean relations and trigger unimaginable calamities and disasters.”

: South Korea and US hold preliminary bilateral discussions in Washington on possibility of South Korea participating in Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

: US announces the deployment of an additional mechanized infantry battalion equipped with tanks and armored infantry fighting vehicles to Korea.

: US and South Korea hold ninth round of talks on replace of the 1974 treaty on civil nuclear cooperation.

: In her first press conference of the year, President Park Geun-hye states that “in a nutshell, I think unification would be the jackpot.”

: South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se visits Washington and meets Secretary of Defense Hagel and Secretary of State John Kerry.

: ROK Foreign Ministry announces that negotiations with the US over the so-called 123 agreement on civilian nuclear energy will resume on Jan. 7, 2014.

: Japanese Prime Minister Abe visits the Yasukuni Shrine.

: South Korea approves private humanitarian aid to North Korea.

: Dennis Rodman visits North Korea to train basketball players.

: ROK Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kyou-hyun meets Deputy US Secretary of State William Burns to discuss the evolving security situation with North Korea, China’s expanded ADIZ, and Japan’s pursuit of the right of collective self-defense.

: South Korea’s expanded ADIZ goes into effect.

: North Korea denounces Vice President Biden’s recent trip to Asia saying the trip was meant to militarily contain North Korea.

: Korean Central News Agency announces that Jang Song Thaek was tried before a military tribunal for attempting to overthrow the state and summarily executed on Dec. 12.

: US and South Korea hold working-level talks on the transfer of wartime operational control (OPCON).

: South Korea’s head of the Defense Ministry’s Policy Planning office Lt. Gen. Ryu Je-sung visits Washington and meets Under Secretary of Defense for Policy James Miller, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State of East Asian and Pacific Affairs James Zumwalt, National Security Staff Korea Director Sydney Seiler.

: Ninth round of SMA negotiations are held in Seoul.

: North Korea confirms via the Korean Central News Agency that Jang Song Thaek has been purged and releases a list of accusations against him.

: South Korea announces expanded ADIZ that includes Ieodo and overlaps with both Japan’s ADIZ and China’s recently declared ADIZ.

: North Korea releases Merrill Newman.

: Vice President Joe Biden and President Park Geun-hye meet in Seoul and agree to cooperate on the row created by China’s newly declared ADIZ.

: ROK National Intelligence Service announces that Jang Song Thaek has likely been removed from power following the execution of his two closest associates in November.

: ROK Deputy Prime Minister Hyun Oh Seok expresses South Korea’s interest in holding talks to explore possibility of joining TPP.

: China’s Ministry of National Defense announces East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ).

: ROK Joint Chiefs of Staff approve the purchase of 40 F-35A stealth fighters with the option to later purchase 20 more over the course of four years beginning in 2018.

: Special Representative for North Korea Policy Davies reaffirms the US position that negotiations with Pyongyang cannot take place unless it suspends its nuclear program.

: National Security Advisor Rice says in a speech at Georgetown University that the US should not seek to resume negotiations with North Korea as long as parts of Pyongyang’s nuclear program are still in operation.

: Reports surface that North Korea is detaining a US citizen, 85-year-old Korean War veteran Merrill Newman.

: State Department issues a heightened travel advisory against North Korea.

: Seventh round of SMA negotiations kicks off in Washington.

: US Special Envoy on North Korean Human Rights Issues Robert King arrives in Seoul for talks with South Korean officials.

: Following the rejection of Boeing F-15 Silent Eagle, Lockheed Martin’s F-35 emerges as the only qualified contender for Seoul’s newly-restarted fighter jet project.

: Special Representative for North Korea Policy Davies meets South Korean Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Cho and Japan’s Director General for Oceanian Affairs Bureau in Washington to discuss North Korea’s denuclearization and conditions for re-entering the Six-Party Talks.

: South Korea again asks the US to explain allegations that the NSA targeted the Korean embassy following fresh reports that the NSA labeled South Korea a “focus area.”

: Special Representative for North Korea Policy Davies meets South Korean Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Cho Tae-yong in Washington.

: Sixth round of negotiations for the SMA are held in Seoul.

: Allegations surface that South Korea was targeted for wiretapping by the US National Security Agency (NSA). South Korea seeks clarification from the US.

: US-Korea Institute reports on its blog 38 North that North Korea appears to be digging two new tunnels near the Pyunggye-ri nuclear test site, prompting speculation that Pyongyang is preparing for another nuclear test.

: ROK Chief of the Presidential National Security Office Kim Jang-soo visits the US, meets National Security Advisor Susan Rice, Secretary of State John Kerry, and Secretary of Defense Hagel in Washington.

: South Korea and US sign agreement to set up system for monitoring bioterrorism.

: US Army Pacific Commander Gen. Vincent Brooks says the current timeline for transfer of operational wartime control (OPCON) to the ROK is realistic.

: Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin denies the ROK will join the US defense missile program.

: South Korea, Japan, and the US conduct naval drills off the Korean coast.

: ROK National Intelligence Service director Nam Jae-joon tells Parliament that the Yongbyon reactor has been up and running since August. Nam also confirms that North Korea is strengthening its military targeting Seoul and border islands in the West Sea.

: North Korea condemns the US and South Korea for “military provocations” ahead of planned US-ROK-Japan joint naval drills to be held off the coast of South Korea.

: Seoul remains silent following Japan’s controversial announcement of pursuing collective self-defense with US support.

: Blue House Foreign Affairs Secretary Ji Chul-ki says that South Korea is “greatly interested” in joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership and may bring up the possibility of entering negotiations at the upcoming Asia-Pacific Economic Forum in Bali, Indonesia.

: US experts, including former nuclear negotiator Stephen Bosworth, informally meet North Korean officials in London to discuss a revival of the Six-Party Talks.

: Secretary of Defense Hagel visits Korea. He visits the Demilitarized Zone, celebrates the 60th anniversary of the US-ROK alliance, attends the US-ROK Security Consultative Meeting, and signs with Korean counterpart Kim Kwan-jin a joint military strategy that reaffirms South Korea’s position under the US nuclear umbrella and outlines contingency plans for dealing with the North Korean threat.

: Fourth round of negotiations on Special Measures Agreement (SMA) is held in Washington.

: Former US envoy on North Korea Stephen Bosworth meets North Korean chief negotiator Ri Yong Ho in Berlin to discuss denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

: ROK Defense Acquisition Program Executive Committee restarts high-profile fighter acquisition project and rejects Boeing’s F-15 Silent Eagle as the winner of the project.

: China holds an unofficial seminar in Beijing to mark the 10th anniversary of the Six-Party Talks. The US and ROK decline to send official government representatives.

: Operations resume at the Kaesong Industrial Complex.

: US-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins’ SAIS reports a resumption of activity at North Korea’s Yongbyon nuclear reactor.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Glyn Davies meets South Korean Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Cho Tae-yong in Seoul. Davies states that North Korea’s lack of a “positive attitude” toward denuclearization will hamper the Six-Party Talks process.

: ROK Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin asserts that the December 2015 deadline is not appropriate for Seoul to regain the wartime operational control at the National Assembly’s National Defense Committee meeting.

: US Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel reports to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that North Korea’s chemical weapons are a threat to the ROK Air Force and USFK.

: North Korea rescinds its invitation for US human rights envoy Robert King who was scheduled to visit Pyongyang to seek the release of Kenneth Bae.

: ROK Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin and US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel meet on the sidelines of the ASEAN Defense Ministers’ Meeting-Plus in Brunei.

: US Sen. John McCain says the US will not resume the Six-Party Talks until North Korea shows concrete action towards denuclearization.

: South Korea and the US hold the third round of negotiations for the Special Measures Agreement (SMA) in Seoul. ROK also proposed an amendment to regulate the USFK fund usage to restrict it as a source for USFK base relocation from Yongsan to Pyeongtak.

: Robert King, special envoy for DPRK human rights issues, visits South Korea.

: Lockheed Martin announces that they are working with the US to make the sale of the F-35 fighter jet to South Korea, denying that the plane was eliminated by South Korean government.

: ROK-US Combined Forces Command (CFC) conducts the annual joint military exercise Ulchi Freedom Guardian.

: Eighth US Army confers the title of the honorary commanding general to retired Korean Army Gen. Paik Sun-yup for his service during the Korean War.

: Secretary of State John Kerry sends a congratulating message to South Korea for Aug. 15 Independence Day.

: UN Resident Coordinator Ghulam Isaczai announces a UN appeals to international community for $98 million to support the North Korea humanitarian program.

: Six South Korea F-15K jet fighters participate in the Red Flag exercise, an aerial combat training exercise hosted by the US Air Force, in Eielson AFB, Alaska.

: Institute for Science and International Security updates a satellite image of Yongbyun nuclear complex in North Korea showing a possible expansion of the building that houses centrifuge plant for uranium enrichment.

: US Senate confirms Lt Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti as the new commander for USFK, replacing Gen. James Thurman.

: Korea-US Integrated Defense Dialogue (KIDD) is held in Seoul in preparation for the OPCON transfer.

: ROK Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kyou-hyun and US Treasury Department Undersecretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence David Cohen meet in Seoul to review recent sanctions on Iran and North Korea.

: The 60th anniversary of the Korean War Armistice is commemorated at the Yongsan Korean War Memorial, honoring the sacrifices of Korean soldiers and UN allies. The US also holds a commemoration ceremony at the Korean War Memorial in Washington, with President Obama delivering remarks to honor the people who served in the “forgotten victory.”

: South Korea and the US fail to agree on the cost-sharing burden of the USFK.

: ROK Defense Acquisition Program Administration spokesperson announces that it will resume the bidding for the F-X Project and increase the overall budget if necessary.

: US House Foreign Affairs Committee passes a bill to extend the existing agreement on the civilian nuclear energy cooperation between South Korea and US.

: Track 1.5 US-ROK-China strategic dialogue is for the first time held in Seoul to discuss North Korea’s nuclear program.

: ROK government offers an increase in South Korea’s cost-sharing of the Special Measures Agreement from $778.1 million to $780 million.

: US Defense Security Cooperation Agency notifies Congress that the ROK government has asked to buy AIM-120C-7 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missiles to be installed in KF-16 and F-15K aircraft, with an estimated budget of US $452 million.

: Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey acknowledges that there are “some setbacks” to completing the OPCON transfer plan in his written testimony to the US Senate Armed Services Committee.

: USFK holds a ground-breaking ceremony for its headquarters relocation to Camp Humphrey in Pyeongtaek.

: US Defense Department announces that the ROK requested a delay in OPCON transfer. The ROK Defense Ministry in response releases a statement that the ROK would like to review all options regarding the transfer due to the current situation with North Korea.

: ROK Ambassador for International Security Affairs Choi Sung-joo and US State Department’s coordinator for cyber issues Christopher Painter meet at the second Cyber Policy Consultation in Washington.

: Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano visits Seoul to meet Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Strategy and Finance Hyun Oh-seok.

: ROK Defense Acquisition Program Administration suspends the F-X project bidding, as all bidding contenders exceeded the budget limit of $7.3 billion.

: US State Department spokesperson expresses concerns about the health of Kenneth Bae, who has been detained in North Korea since November 2012.

: ROK and the US hold the first round of negotiations for the Special Measures Agreement. They exchange demands and express hope of reaching an agreement by October.

: DPRK Foreign Minister Pak Ui Chun calls on the US to hold talks without precondition at the ARF meeting in Brunei.

: Secretary of State Kerry comments at the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF) that the US, Korea, China, and Japan are united in working toward the denuclearization of North Korea.

: US Assistant Secretary of State for International Security and Nonproliferation Thomas Countryman testifies before the House Foreign Affairs Committee emphasizing the importance of the extension of the existing 123-Agreement to allow enough time to secure nonproliferation and civil nuclear cooperation objectives with South Korea.

: South Korean police and USFK agree to establish joint patrols near Yongsan in Seoul to prevent civil-military incidents.

: President Obama sends a statement to Congress notifying it that the White House will extend economic sanctions on North Korea under the International Emergency Economic Power Act for another year.

: ROK Special Representative Cho Tae-yong, US Special Representative Glyn Davies, and Director General of Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs Shinsuke Sugiyama meet in Washington and agree to enforce stricter terms on North Korea for resuming dialogue.

: South Korea and the US establish a joint committee to investigate pollution around the USFK base in Seoul.

: US Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announces that the Pentagon will not cut its budget for security operations on the Korean Peninsula.

: Reps. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) and other republicans send a letter urging Secretary of State John Kerry to recategorize North Korea as a state sponsor of terrorism.

:   President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping agree to cooperate on the denuclearization of North Korea at a summit in Sunnylands, California.

: Rodong Sinmun criticizes Seoul for creating a new combined command body with the US after the transfer of wartime operation control in 2015, stating that the presence of the US in South Korea is the primary reason for the tension in the Korean Peninsula.

: US Secretary of State John Kerry announces that South Korea is exempt from the Iran sanctions outlined in Section 1245 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

: ROK chief negotiator Park Ro-byug and US chief negotiator Thomas Countryman meet for the 7th round of the US-ROK 123 civil nuclear agreement negotiations in Washington, DC.

: ROK Defense Ministry announces an agreement with the US to establish a new Combined Theater Command for post-OPCON transition, replacing the initial Combined Forces Command plan.

: ROK Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin and US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel meet on the sidelines for the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore and agree to develop a joint deterrence posture in response to North Korea’s nuclear and conventional weapons.

:  Rodong Sinmun releases an article stating that North Korea has no plans to unilaterally renounce its nuclear weapons and programs in face of constant threats from the US.

: Cho Tae-yong replaces nuclear envoy Lim Sung-nam as South Korea’s special representative for Korean Peninsula peace and security affairs.

: North Korea reiterates that nuclear weapons are necessary to maintain its sovereignty in the face of a hostile US.

: US Special Envoy for North Korean Human Rights Issues Robert King travels to Korea to meet ROK officials, including Special Representative Lim Sung-nam.

: North Korea launches six short-range missiles from its east coast in response to “hostile” US-ROK joint military exercises.

: US State Department spokesperson urges the DPRK to grant Kenneth Bae amnesty and immediate release.

: Special Representative Glyn Davies visits Seoul and meets ROK counterpart Lim Sung-nam. He stresses China’s role in the denuclearization process.

: Rodong Sinmun refutes assessments that tensions have eased on the Korean Peninsula, citing US hostile actions such as the military exercises involving the USS Nimitz.

: ROK and the US conduct joint naval exercises off the east coast near Pohang.

: North Korea criticizes President Park’s US trip as “a prelude to war.”

: ROK Defense Ministry states that Seoul will focus on developing its own Korea air and missile defense system instead of joining the US-led missile defense system.

: ROK President Park Geun-hye visits the US. She meets UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon in New York, President Barack Obama in Washington, and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa in Los Angeles; she delivers a speech to a joint session of the US Congress.

: USS Nimitz Strike Group participates in a joint US-ROK anti-submarine exercise in the Yellow Sea.

: ROK Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Lim Sung Nam visits Washington, DC to discuss North Korean issues with US Special Representative on North Korea Policy Glyn Davies and other US officials.

: DPRK Supreme Court sentences Korean-American Kenneth Bae to 15 years of hard labor. Former President Jimmy Carter conveys his plans to visit North Korea and possibly secure Bae’s release in a letter to Secretary of State John Kerry.

: US-ROK exercise Foal Eagle concludes.

: Unification Ministry proposes talks with the DRPK to resolve and normalize the KIC issue and warns of “grave action” if the North rejects the offer.

:  US and ROK sign a two-year extension of the 1972 US-ROK Nonproliferation Agreement after failing to revise the agreement, moving the deadline to March 2016.

: ROK Foreign Ministry spokesman Cho Tai-young calls North Korea’s conditions for dialogue “totally incomprehensible” and “illogical,” and asks for them to “make the right choice.”

: KCNA publishes a statement by Supreme Command of the Korean People’s Army that Seoul must apologize first for its “hostile acts” before dialogue can resume.

: President Obama says in an interview that “based on our current intelligence assessments, we do not think that they have that capacity,” to arm a ballistic missile with nuclear weapon, but cautions that the US has to “make sure that we are dealing with every contingency out there” when it comes to North Korean threats.

: DPRK’s Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea calls President Park’s offer to “activate the trust-building process” a “cunning ploy to hide the South’s policy of confrontation and mislead its responsibility for putting the KIC into a crisis.”

: Korean People’s Army issues an ultimatum to South Korea vowing retaliation without notice if anti-North Korean activities continue.

: Senate Committee on Armed Services releases the report “Inquiry into U.S. costs and allied contributions to support the U.S. military presence overseas,” in which the committee finds that “South Korea’s contribution has not kept pace with the growth in U.S. costs,” in referring to burden-sharing in the alliance.

: Secretary Kerry warns North Korea not to carry out the Musudan missile tests during a press conference with Foreign Minister Yun in Seoul, but also stresses that the US is open to talks in order to accomplish the goals of denuclearization and reunification. He reiterates that North Korea will not be accepted as a nuclear power.

: Secretary Kerry meets President Park at the Blue House and pledges firm and strong US support for South Korea against North Korean threats and provocations.

: Unification Minister Ryoo Kihl-jae asks for the KIC standoff to be normalized through dialogue.

: Representative Doug Lamborn (R-CO) discloses a new assessment by the Defense Intelligence Agency which concludes with “moderate confidence” for the first time that North Korea has the capability to make a nuclear weapon small enough to be deliverable by a ballistic missile. This assessment was later refuted by the Department of Defense and also by the Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

: US-ROK Combined Forces Command raises surveillance status from Watchcon 3 to Watchcon 2 to monitor an imminent missile test by North Korea.

: ROK Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning announces the results from its investigation into the cyber-attacks of March 20-26, and identify the DPRK’s Reconnaissance General Bureau as the mastermind behind the attacks.

: Secretary Hagel warns that North Korea, “with its bellicose rhetoric, its actions, has been skating very close to a dangerous line” and that it should be “neutralized” during a press conference at the Pentagon.

: DPRK’s Asia-Pacific Peace Committee releases a statement that foreigners living in South Korea should work out measures for evacuation to avoid being hurt in the event of war.

: Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se warns North Korea that it will gain “absolute nothing” from its threats and provocations.

: ROK lawmaker Chung Mong-joon calls for South Korea to withdraw from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty in the face of the North Korean threat, develop its own nuclear weapons, and for the US to redeploy nuclear weapons back to the Korean Peninsula.

: Adm. Samuel Locklear, commander of US Pacific Command, testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee that the US and South Korean forces are confident in their ability to intercept a North Korean ballistic missile.

: US Forces Korea hands over the soldier in the BB gun shooting incident to the Seoul Correction Service after South Korea made the request under the “sympathetic consideration” clause of the Status of Forces Agreement.

: KWP Secretary in Charge of South Korean Affairs Kim Yang-gon announces North Korea will tentatively suspend operations at the KIC.

: North Korea sends warning messages to foreign diplomatic missions asking all embassies in Pyongyang to move out for their security.

: White House spokesman Carney urges North Korea to stop its provocations.

: South Korean government officials confirm that North Korea has moved Musudan missiles to the East Coast.

: Korean People’s Army announces that they have “final approval for merciless operations” against the US.

: North Korea bans South Korean workers from entering the Kaesong Industrial Complex (KIC) and only allows those inside to go home. Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin says the military is considering all available options, including possible military action, to ensure the safety of the South Korean workers in Kaesong.

: Foreign Minister Yun meets Secretary Hagel, Deputy Secretary of State Burns and National Security Advisor Donilon.

: In an interview with ABC News, Gen. Thurman calls the situation in Korea “volatile” and “dangerous,” and fears that a “miscalculation” can cause “a kinetic provocation.”

: Secretary Hagel calls North Korean behavior a “real, clear danger and threat to the US and its Asia-Pacific allies” in a speech made at the National Defense University.

: The Pentagon announces that it will deploy the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system to Guam in response to the North Korean threat.

: Foreign Minister Yun meets Secretary Kerry in Washington.

: North Korea announces its intentions to restart the five-megawatt nuclear reactor at Yongbyon. State Department spokeswoman Nuland reiterates that the US will not accept the DPRK as a nuclear state.

: President Park orders the military take a strong response without political considerations in the event of any provocation by North Korea.

: US F-22 stealth fighter jets from Japan arrive at Osan Air Base to participate in US-ROK Foal Eagle field exercise.

: KCNA says Kim Jong Un has ordered the strategic rockets to be on standby so that they may strike the US mainland, its military bases in the Pacific and those in south Korea.”

: President Park meets Bob Corker, US Senate Foreign Relations Committee ranking Republican, in Seoul and asks for congressional attention to ROK-US nuclear pact and for revisions that enable South Korea to expand its peaceful use of atomic power.

: Rodong Sinmun calls on countries involved in the “nuclear standoff” on the Korean Peninsula to come forward with their views on what future actions should be taken that can either lead to war or peace.

: Secretary of Defense Hagel says that the US has to be prepared for “any eventuality” on the Korean Peninsula during a news conference at the Pentagon.

: North Korea announces that it has cut a military hotline with South Korea. State Department’s deputy spokesman Patrick Ventrell condemns North Korea for severing the hotline but says the US will maintain its own direct communication channel with North Korea.

: Defense Secretary Hagel and Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin speak by phone reaffirming the US commitment to South Korean defense, including extended deterrence. They also discuss the plan to increase US ground-based interceptors and early warning and tracking radar in response to the North Korean threat.
March 28, 2013: US Strategic Command sends B-2 stealth bombers to conduct a simulated attack on the Korean Peninsula as part of the ongoing Foal Eagle training exercise.

: KCNA releases a statement saying the DPRK military has ordered all of its artillery units, including strategic rocket and long-range artillery units, to adopt “combat readiness posture No. 1” in order to strike the continental US, its overseas bases and South Korea and in retaliation against US B-52 bombers flights over the Korean Peninsula.

: South Korea’s Navy conducts maritime drills in the western sea.

: North Korea stages a national-scale combined army and naval exercise near Wonsan, Kangwon Province.

: ROK Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Jung Seoung-jo, and Commander of the Combined Forces Command James Thurman, sign a combined counter-provocation plan, which guarantees a joint counterattack against any surgical strike on the South from the North.

: Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton Carter meets Foreign Minister Yun and Defense Minister Kim in Seoul.

: ROK lawmaker Chung Mong-joon of the Saenuri Party says in a CNN interview that it is necessary to redeploy tactical nuclear weapon in South Korea.

: The 8th US Army public affairs officer vows to prevent misconduct of soldiers after a recent series of criminal incidents involving US soldiers.

: Drunken US soldiers are arrested for allegedly assaulting local South Korean police in two separate cases.

: Secretary Kerry congratulates South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se in a phone call and suggests the ROK and US work more closely together at the UN Security Council, and on global issues including climate change.

: Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announces plans for 14 additional ground-based missile interceptors in Alaska and California to counter North Korean military threats.

:   President Obama and China’s new president Xi Jinping agree on the need for cooperation on the denuclearization of North Korea during their phone call conversation

: DPRK cuts the Red Cross telephone line that serves as a hotline with the ROK.

: Rodong Sinmun writes that the time for a showdown war is at hand and claims the Korean Armistice Agreement to be null and void.

: South Korea and the US conduct annual Key Resolve military exercises.

: North Korea’s official newspaper Rodong Sinmun claims its military has entered the “final all-out war stage, awaiting the final order to strike.” It also warns that the country’s nuclear arms are prepared for combat.

: DPRK announces that it is nullifying all nonaggression and denuclearization agreements with South Korea. ROK Defense Ministry spokesman Kim Min-seok says if North Korea attacks with a nuclear weapon, Kim Jong Un’s regime will be “erased from the earth.”

: North Korea vows to launch a pre-emptive nuclear strike against the US. Several hours later, the UN Security Council unanimously adopts resolution 2094 imposing tougher sanctions on North Korea.

: North Korea threatens to turn Seoul and Washington into “seas of fire” through a “precise nuclear strike.”

: Maj. Gen. Kim Yong-hyun, the ROK joint chiefs of staff’s head of operations, says the ROK military will retaliate at point of origin, supporting forces, and command structures to the next North Korean provocation.

: North Korea threatens to nullify the Korean Armistice Agreement if the US and South Korea conduct Key Resolve military exercise. Jay Carney, White House spokesperson, responds by stating that North Korea will achieve “nothing by threats or provocations.”

: Two US soldiers are accused of firing a BB gun at pedestrians and leading police on a 12-km high-speed car chase in Seoul.

:   South Korea and the US begin Foal Eagle, a two-month military field training exercise focused on the Korean Peninsula.

:   Former NBA player Dennis Rodman watches a basketball game and has dinner with Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang.

: President Park and US National Security Advisor Tom Donilon meet at the Blue House and discuss cooperation over North Korea’s nuclear programs.

: Park Geun-hye is inaugurated as South Korea’s first female president.

: US Senate adopts a bill condemning North Korea for its nuclear test and urges tougher action against the country.

: North Korean diplomat Jon Yong-ryong threatens to inflict the “final destruction” of South Korea at a UN Conference on Disarmament meeting held in Geneva.

: US Ambassador to the ROK Sung Kim expresses opposition to South Korea’s nuclear armament and the redeployment of US tactical nuclear weapons to the peninsula.

: ROK and US launch a three-day joint naval exercise on the East Coast of the Korean Peninsula to test combat readiness in response to North Korea’s recent nuclear test.

: House of Representatives passes a bill condemning North Korea’s provocations and repeated violations of multiple UN Security Council resolutions.

: Presidents Obama and Lee Myung-bak discuss North Korea’s nuclear test and agree to work closely together to seek a range of measures aimed at impeding North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile programs and reducing the risk of proliferation.

: Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin discuss collaboration in the wake of North Korea’s nuclear test. Panetta reaffirms US commitment, including extended deterrence commitment, to defend the ROK from aggression.

: North Korea announces it conducted a third underground nuclear test.

: President Obama calls North Korea’s nuclear test “a highly provocative act” and vows to pursue firm action in response. He also urges North Korea to meet international obligations at the first State of the Union Address of his second term.

: ROK presidential delegation meets White House National Security Advisor Tom Donilon and delivers President-elect Park’s message to President Obama. The delegation also meets Secretary Kerry, Deputy Secretary of State Bill Burns, Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, and Special Representative Davis.

: ROK delegation led by Lee Hahn-koo, the floor leader of the ruling Saenuri Party, meets Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman in Washington to discuss revision of the 123 civil nuclear agreement and KORUS FTA implementation.

: Secretary Kerry has a phone call with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi to discuss UNSC Resolution 2087 commitments.

: US and South Korea conduct a joint naval exercise in the East Sea.

: Secretary of State John Kerry and Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan discuss North Korea’s possible nuclear test on the phone and agree on the need to “ensure that North Korea understands that it will face significant consequences from the international community if it continues its provocative behavior.”

: ROK Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin orders fast development and deployment of long-range ballistic missiles to reach all of North Korea.

: Mark Lippert, assistant secretary of defense for Asian and Pacific security affairs, Lim Kwan Bin, ROK deputy defense minister for policy, and Nishi Masanori, director general of the Japanese Defense Ministry’s Defense Policy discuss regional security issues.

: ROK Defense Ministry spokesman Kim Min-seok states that the US and ROK have been jointly conducting small-scale crisis management task force in preparation for a possible third nuclear test by North Korea.

: Special Representative Davies meets Japanese counterpart Sugiyama Shinsuke in Tokyo.

: Special Representative Davies travels to China and meets Vice Foreign Minister Fu Ying and Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Affairs Wu Dawei in Beijing.

: Glyn Davies, US special representative for North Korea policy, meets ROK nuclear envoy Lim Sung-nam in Seoul.

:  UN Security Council unanimously adopts resolution 2087 to sanction North Korea over its December 2012 ballistic missile launch.

:  US Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell leads a delegation to Seoul and meets ROK President-elect Park Geun-hye.

: Former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson and Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt visit North Korea.

: US Forces Korea (USFK) defers again tour normalization, which would have increased the number of US troops allowed to bring their families into South Korea.

: US Department of State spokeswoman Victoria Nuland states that the upcoming trip to North Korea by Eric Schmidt, the executive chairman of Google, is strictly private and does not carry any messages from the US government.

: House of Representatives passes a resolution condemning North Korean December 2012 rocket launch.

: US House of Representatives passes the North Korean Child Welfare Act of 2012 calling for the secretary of state to take measures to aid the North Korean children who live in dangerous environments outside of North Korea.

: Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan visits a US base at the DMZ and states that the US-ROK alliance will be “far outlasting” regardless of leadership change in South Korea.

: Yonhap reports that the incoming Park administration will not differ much in its foreign policy than that of the Lee administration, as both administrations see the US-ROK alliance as the center of South Korea’s relations with other nations.

: UN Security Council decision in response to the DPRK rocket launch is delayed due to China’s implicit opposition to tougher sanctions against North Korea.

: President-elect Park and President Obama hold a phone conversation and agree to lessen the security crisis in the region that resulted from the North Korean rocket launch.

:  Chosun Ilbo reports that Kim Jong Un at a banquet celebration for the recent rocket launch orders scientists in North Korea to build more powerful rockets.

: Park Geun-hye wins the South Korean presidential elections.

: US pressures China to endorse UN sanctions on North Korea in response to its rocket launch. China has not shown any signs of complying.

: US Department of State announces that it will implement tougher sanctions on North Korea. It also adds that it will continue to engage the regime through bilateral and multilateral dialogues and interactions.

: Kim Jong Un leads memorial service for Kim Jong Il, marking the first anniversary of his father’s death.

: South Korean Navy rescue ship retrieves the North Korean rocket debris.

: North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) states the DPRK satellite is circling the earth with a speed of 7.6 kilometers per second.

: DPRK launches its Unha-3 rocket. The UN Security Council condemns the launch and convenes a meeting to discuss the appropriate measures in response to the launch.

: DPRK announces that it will extend the planned rocket launch window by one week to Dec. 29 due to a technical problem with the rocket’s first-stage control engine module.

: ROK Minister of Knowledge and Economy Hong Suk-woo announces that the US and ROK have agreed to increase cooperation on shale gas.

: US extends Iran sanctions exemptions to nine countries including ROK, China, India, and Turkey for reducing purchases of Iranian oil over the past six months.

: Combined Forces Command announces that it has raised its alert level by one notch in response to DPRK’s threat to launch a long-range rocket. US Navy ships move into the region of the Korean Peninsula to closely monitor Pyongyang’s potential rocket launch.

: Department of State deputy spokesman Mark Toner announces that the US government will continue with diplomatic push to dissuade DPRK from carrying out the rocket launch, but also states that sanctions will be taken into consideration in case of a launch.

: Incoming Chairman of the US House Committee on Foreign Relations Ed Royce (R-CA) highlights DPRK’s planned rocket launch as a “wake-up call” for the US and a threat to peace and security in Northeast Asia.

: DPRK announces its plan to launch a satellite between Dec. 10 and Dec. 22. Department of State spokeswoman Nuland calls the launch a “highly provocative act” and urges DPRK not to proceed with the launch.

: White House Press Secretary Jay Carney dismisses the US secret trip to Pyongyang, saying that it is even “news” to him.

: Yonhap reports that a US delegation made a secret visit to DPRK in August in an attempt to prevent it from taking provocative actions before the US presidential elections.

: US Ambassador Sung Kim states that the US and ROK are ready to resume talks with DPRK, but only if DPRK displays a sincere commitment to dialogue.

: ROK government returns remains of two US soldiers killed during the Korean War as the Ministry of Defense completes an eight-month excavation for Korean War remains.

: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Dempsey travels to Seoul and visits the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).

: Department of State spokeswoman Nuland tells Yonhap that the Kim Jong Un regime has a clear choice between having improved relations with the US and continued isolation from the international community.

: Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA) reports that with President Obama’s reelection, Korean exporters are likely to face higher trade barriers.

: ROK presidential candidate Park Geun-hye says that if elected in December, she would pursue “balanced diplomacy” between the US and China.

: US Ambassador Sung Kim expresses confidence in the continued stability of the US-ROK alliance, regardless of the outcomes of presidential elections in the US and ROK.

: President Obama wins reelection in the US presidential elections.

: ROK military officials acknowledge that the US-made cruise missiles that ROK was planning to acquire might be  partially incompatible with the F-15K.

: Foreign Minister Kim Sung-Hwan tells media that China will be an important partner in maintaining peace and security on the Korean Peninsula, explaining the need for Seoul-Washington-Beijing trilateral talks in the near future.

: Special Representative Davies says that regardless of the winner in the US presidential election, there will be no major changes in US policy toward North Korea.

: Assistant Secretary of State Campbell discusses the North Korean nuclear program in Seoul, emphasizing that the US-ROK alliance will remain strong regardless of the presidential election results in Washington and Seoul.

: Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and Minister of Defense Kim Kwan-jin attend the 44th US-ROK Security Consultative Meeting in Washington and agree to pursue more active bilateral security consultation centered on the Korea-US Integrated Defense Dialogue (KIDD). They also decide to identify specific types of nuclear threats by North Korea and develop joint deterrence strategies designed for each threat type by 2014.

: US Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman General Martin Dempsey and ROK Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman General Jung Seung-jo attend the 36th US-ROK Military Committee Meeting and reaffirm their commitment to not tolerate any aggression from North Korea and to further strengthen the Alliance’s deterrent capabilities.

: National Security Advisor Chun Young-woo says that South Korea should think about alternative plans if the civil nuclear cooperation agreement is not revised as it wants.

: Special Representative Davies travels to Seoul and meets counterpart Lim Sung-nam, National Security Advisor Chun Yung-woo, and other senior officials.

: ROK Ambassador to the US Young-jin Choi states during an annual parliamentary audit session that the civil nuclear cooperation agreement will become the priority issue to be discussed between new governments in the US and ROK in 2013.

: Vice Foreign Minister Ahn Ho-young and Deputy Secretary of State William Burns co-host the US-ROK Strategic Dialogue in Seoul.

: US-Japan-ROK trilateral meeting is held in Tokyo.

: In response to North Korea’s warning that its missile range can reach the US mainland, State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland urges North Korea to stop bragging about its missiles and defends Washington’s decision to allow Seoul to extend its missile range.

: Blue House announces a new missile agreement with the US. White House Press Secretary Jay Carney reiterates that the missile deal is designed to improve ROK’s ability to defend specifically against DPRK ballistic missiles and the impact of revisions is thus limited.

: US military official states that the US is planning to redeploy a chemical unit to South Korea to strengthen the combined deterrence against North Korea, nine years after the withdrawal of the 23rd Chemical Battalion from South Korea in 2004.

:  US government official states that the Congress is expected to approve the proposed sale of Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicles to South Korea as a means of preparing the country to retake wartime operational control of its troops from the United States by 2015.

: President Lee Myung-bak seeks parliamentary support for his drive to reform South Korea’s armed forces, stressing that time is running short as the country is scheduled to assume wartime operational control over its forces from the US in 2015.

: Acting Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security Rose Gottemoeller calls for North Korea to join the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC).

: Secretary Clinton meets her South Korean and Japanese counterparts in New York and asks the two nations to lower tensions in Northeast Asia, while reiterating that Washington will not intervene directly in bilateral issues between Seoul and Tokyo.

: South Korea’s Cabinet approves a revised bill to extend missions of troops in Afghanistan until the end of 2013.

: Robert King, US special envoy for North Korean human rights issues, visits Seoul to discuss the latest human rights situation in North Korea.

: Lim Sung-nam, South Korea’s chief negotiator to the Six-Party Talks, visits Washington and meets Special Representative for North Korea Policy Glyn Davies and Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell to share evaluations of the situation on the Korean Peninsula.

: South Korea officially condemns the attack on the US Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and the killing of U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and his colleagues.

: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets President Lee Myung-bak on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum in Vladivostok. She urges South Korea and Japan to find a calmer approach toward Dokdo/Takeshima and stresses the need for cooperation among South Korea, US, and Japan in resolving North Korea’s nuclear issues.

: President Barack Obama announces that if he is reelected, he will continue to confront North Korea unless it abandons its nuclear program.

: US and ROK complete Ulchi Freedom Guardian.

: State Department spokesperson says that disputes between Korea and Japan make the US uncomfortable.

: South Korea admits to importing Iranian crude oil during July despite claims that it would not do so.

: US and South Korea launch Ulchi Freedom Guardian (UFG) joint military exercise. In response, Kim Jong Un travels to the disputed ROK-DPRK sea border and calls the drill a threat to peace and stability in the region.

: Jang Song Taek meets President Hu Jintao and Premier Wen Jiabao in Beijing.

: Richard Armitage and Joseph Nye release the U.S.-Japan Alliance Anchoring Stability report, which states “it is essential for Japan to confront the historical issues” with South Korea, and declares the US has no place to judge on the situation.

: State Department spokesperson urges South Korea and Japan to repair ties emphasizing that the US would not take sides in the matter.

: President Lee visits Dokdo, heightening tensions between Japan and Korea.

: Joongang Ilbo reports that US and ROK are in talks to create a new joint military organization to replace Combined Forces Command (CFC) after the transfer of wartime operational control to South Korea in 2015.

: Ministry of Unification rejects North Korea’s allegations of South Korea’s plot of terrorism to sabotage statues in North Korea.

: DPRK Foreign Ministry says DPRK will build its nuclear arsenal against the US.

: Gary Samore, special assistant to the president and White House coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction, proliferation, and terrorism, says South Korea can import enriched uranium from US or France, expressing an unyielding stance to the ROK’s demands in renegotiating 1-2-3 Agreement.

: US Ambassador to South Korea Sung Kim states that North Korea should follow Myanmar’s recent steps in making political and economic reforms and that nuclear ambitions will only further isolate North Korea.

: North Korea deploys 20 attack helicopters near South Korea’s Baeknyeong Island in the West Sea.

: Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan states that he will urge the US to lift restrictions on the reprocessing of nuclear fuel.

: State Department spokesperson states that US has no hostile intentions toward North Korea.

: North Korea says that the country has no choice but to “totally reexamine the nuclear issue” after strongly condemning South Korea and the US for attempting to destroy statues of its founding leader Kim Il Sung.

: North Korea accuses South Korea and the US of inciting a defector to damage statues of the country’s founding leader Kim Il Sung.

: Kim Jong Un is awarded the title of marshal and supreme commander of the Korean People’s Army.

: North Korean Central News Agency announces that Gen. Hyon Yong Chol has been awarded the title of vice marshal of the Korean People’s Army.

: ROK DAPA announces that it has approved bid proposals by three foreign defense companies for a multi-million dollar fighter jet project.

: North Korean Central News Agency announces that the country’s military chief Gen. Ri Yong Ho has been relieved of all his posts due to illness.

: Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and Japanese Foreign Minister Gemba Koichiro meet on the sidelines of the ASEAN Regional Forum in Phnom Penh and agree to form a trilateral consultative body.

: ROK deputy envoy to the Six-Party Talks Cho Hyun-dong and US counterpart Clifford Hart hold talks ahead of the ASEAN Regional Forum where they reaffirm that the two countries will not ease pressure on North Korea until it gives up a policy of confrontation.

: USFK Commander Gen. James Thurman apologizes for an illegal arrest of three civilians by US military personnel.

: In its response to a North Korean performance featuring Disney characters without authorization, the US stresses the importance of protecting intellectual property rights.

: Lt. Gen. Jan-Marc Jouas, deputy commander of United States Forces Korea (USFK), apologizes for the recent handcuffing of three South Korean civilians by US troops during a dispute over parking outside a US Air Base.

: Kim Jong Un attends a concert in Pyongyang, a debut performance for the newly formed Moranbong troupe featuring classic Disney characters.

: Kim Jong Un loosens government restrictions on outlawed food and strict standards on women attire.

: Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan apologizes to the nation for pursuing a military pact with Japan without making enough efforts to win public support for the agreement.

: Oil imports to South Korea from Tehran halt due to the European Union’s ban on insuring Iranian oil shipments.

: South Korea’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade says that Tehran made an offer to deliver crude oil to South Korea using its own ships.

: South Korea postpones the signing of the ROK-Japan military pact which would incorporate extensive intelligence sharing with Tokyo.

:   Nominee for US ambassador to Myanmar Derek Mitchell says that Myanmar should end all ties with North Korea if it wants to to normalize relations with the US.

: South Korea announces that it will halt oil imports from Iran starting in July due to a European Union ban on insuring shipments of Iranian crude oil.

: Russia Deputy Chief nuclear envoy Ambassador Grigory Logvinov arrives in Seoul for a three-day visit to meet South Korea nuclear envoy Lim Sung-nam and Director General of DPRK Nuclear Affairs Cho Hyun-dong to discuss the resumption of Six-Party Talks.

: South Korea’s Ministry of Strategy and Finance says its reliance on Iranian oil imports decreased in the first quarter of 2012.

:  South Korea and the US military conduct the largest, single-day joint military drill to commemorate the 62nd anniversary of the Korean War in Pocheon, South Korea.

: US Senate passes a bill to ban food aid to North Korea unless a presidential waiver is used.

: South Korea, Japan, and the US conduct their first official trilateral joint naval exercise joined by US aircraft carrier USS George Washington in the Yellow Sea.

: White House announces that it will extend North Korean sanctions another year as it poses an “unusual and extraordinary threat.”

: US deploys Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS) missiles and Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) artillery to USFK to increase firepower in South Korea.

: South Korean Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) announces three bidders – Boeing’s F-15 Silent Eagle, Lockheed Martin’s F-35 Lightning II, and the Eurofighter Typhoon – for a $6.9 billion contract in acquiring 60 fighter jets.

:   US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta host a “2+2 meeting” with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan and Defense Minister Kim Kwan-Jin at the State Department in Washington.

:   Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell expresses US hope for a stable relationship between South Korea and Japan.

: State Department spokesperson Victoria Nuland says the US is concerned about allegations that China assisted North Korea’s missile program.

: Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee Sen. Carl Levin says he has no problem with allowing South Korea to develop longer-range missiles if they are deployed in a “non-threatening way.”

: US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announces that South Korea and India will be exempt from Washington’s sanctions on Iranian oil.

: Rep. Donald Manzullo (R-IL) says in a House hearing that deepening ties with South Korea by extending the current civilian nuclear pact will help US manufacturers.

: US Defense Security Cooperation Agency announces that it will sell $325 million worth of advanced weapons to South Korea.

: Pentagon replaces Brig. Gen. Tolley, commander of US Special Forces in Korea.

: South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan warns North Korea of a “firm response” if it engages in further provocations.

: South Korean Foreign Ministry spokesperson Cho Byung-jae states that North Korea cannot have a status as a nuclear-weapon state.

: George Little, spokesperson for the US Department of Defense, tells reporters that “[i]t was misreported that there are U.S. boots on the ground in North Korea.”

: DPRK’s Constitution is revised to state that North Korea is a “nuclear-armed state.” Spokesperson for the US Department of State comments that the US “will never accept North Korea as a nuclear power.”

: The Diplomat quotes Brig. Gen. Neil Tolley, commander of US Special Forces in South Korea, saying that “we send [Republic of Koread soldiers and U.S. soldiers to the North to do special reconnaissance” on North Korea’s tunnel infrastructure.

: US Special Representative for North Korean Policy Glyn Davies and Japanese Vice Foreign Minister Yamaguchi Tsuyoshi state that US and Japan would engage in dialogue with North Korea if Pyongyang refrains from provocations. Ben Rhodes, deputy national security adviser for strategic communications, comments that the US will consider food aid if Pyongyang is “serious about moving in a different direction.” South Korea warns Pyongyang that it would face greater sanctions and grave consequences if it conducts a third nuclear test.

: North Korea announces that it will not conduct a nuclear test but will continue to bolster its nuclear development and satellite capabilities.

: Nuclear envoys from Seoul, Washington, and Tokyo warn that North Korea will face tighter sanctions and greater isolation if it conducts a third nuclear test.

: US House of Representatives passes a bill to extend the North Korean Human Rights Act until 2017.

: White House National Security Council deputy spokesman Robert Jenson states that tactical nuclear weapons will not be redeployed to Korea.

:  US exempts South Korea from Iranian oil sanctions after Seoul decreases dependence on Iranian oil by 30 percent.

: US House Armed Services Committee passes an amendment to reintroduce tactical nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula.

: Assistant US Trade Representative for Japan, Korea, and APEC Affairs Wendy Cutler states that the KORUS FTA will not be renegotiated.

: North Korea announces that it will continue to develop nuclear and missile capabilities, against the urging of the permanent members of the UN Security Council.

: The UN expands North Korean sanctions after the failed rocket launch in April.

: A massive candle light rally takes place in Seoul to halt US beef imports and renegotiate the KORUS Free Trade Agreement (FTA) after a reported case of mad cow disease.

: President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Noda Yoshihiko agree not to tolerate North Korea’s nuclear threat during Noda’s visit to the White House.

: President Barack Obama states that the US will no longer accept North Korea’s strategy of provocations for concessions.

: The Food, Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries Committee of South Korea’s National Assembly passes a bipartisan, nonbinding resolution to suspend US beef imports following a case of  mad cow disease in California.

: The Blue House rejects increasing calls to halt quarantine inspections on US beef imports after an US dairy cow was found to have mad cow disease.

: Park Geun-hye, a leading presidential hopeful, says that South Korea should halt quarantine inspections of US beef until it is confirmed safe to consume.

: Two South Korea retailers halt US beef sales over new case of mad cow disease in California.

: White House Press Secretary Jay Carney says the US has raised issue with the Chinese government about suspected missile cooperation between China and North Korea.

: UNSC adopts a President’s Statement condemning North Korea’s failed satellite launch and orders its sanctions committee to expand sanctions against North Korea.

:   North Korea withdraws its offer to accept IAEA inspections at the Yongbyon nuclear facilities in response to the withdrawal of the offer of food aid from the US.

: President Obama says that the US would work with the international community to further isolate North Korea after the country’s unsuccessful rocket launch.

: DPRK launches its rocket.

: North Korea holds the fifth session of the 12th Supreme People’s Assembly. Kim Jong Un is elected first chairman of the DPRK National Defense Committee.

: United Nations Security Council (UNSC) holds an emergency meeting to discuss the North Korean rocket launch.

: A legislative election is held in South Korea, with the ruling Saenuri Party surprisingly renewing a majority in the National Assembly.

: A ROK intelligence report reports the excavation at the Punggye-ri test site is in its final stages, hinting at North Korea’s intention of a third nuclear test.

: DPRK allows invited foreign press to tour the Sohae Satellite Launch Center and see the satellite.

: Pyongyang threatens to retaliate against any country that intercepts a DPRK rocket booster or collects the rocket debris.

: President Obama releases a Presidential Memorandum on sanctions on Iran.

: Peter Lavoy, acting assistant secretary of defense for Asian and Pacific affairs, tells the House Armed Services Committee that the US has suspended food aid to North Korea.

: President Obama visits South Korea to attend the second Nuclear Security Summit and hold a bilateral summit with President Lee.

: Gary Samore, special assistant to the president and White House coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction, proliferation, and terrorism, says the DPRK will face a “strong response” if it goes ahead with its plan to launch a long-range rocket.

: President Lee Myung-bak says in a joint interview that ROK and the US are expected to reach a compromise on allowing Seoul to develop long-range ballistic missiles.

: Through Korea Central News Agency, DPRK claims that its planned rocket launch has nothing to do with a recent nuclear deal with the US.

: US announces exemptions for 11 countries from the newly passed Iranian oil and economic sanctions, and does not include South Korea on its list.

: IAEA spokeswoman Gill Tudor confirms that the agency received the invitation from DPRK on March 16 inviting the agency’s inspectors to return to the country.

: US State Department spokeswoman says the North Korean rocket launch would violate UN resolutions prohibiting the use of ballistic missile technology.

: DPRK announces its plan to launch an earth observation satellite, Kwangmyongsong-3.

: The US-Korea Free Trade Agreement takes effect.

: Special UN Rapporteur on North Korean Human Rights Marzuki Darusman calls on all states “to adhere to the principle of non-refoulement,” making a thinly veiled request to China to not return North Korean defectors.

: In a joint press conference with ROK Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan in Washington, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says the US is opposed to the forceful repatriation of North Korean refugees, considering it a breach of international agreements.

: Ri Yong Ho, DPRK’s vice foreign minister and envoy to nuclear disarmament negotiations, and South Korean counterpart, Lim Sung-nam attend a two-day, academic forum on security in Northeast Asia in New York.

: Choi Young-jin, a former vice foreign minister and ambassador to the United Nations, is named South Korea’s new ambassador to the US.

: Robert King, US special envoy for North Korea human rights issues, and Jon Brause, senior U.S. Agency for International Development official arrive in Beijing to finalize arrangements for the first US government food aid shipment to DPRK in three years.

: DPRK threatens to launch a “sacred war” against ROK over alleged defamation of its leadership.

: Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman says that China hopes the US-DPRK agreement will lead to the speedy resumption of the Six-Party Talks.

: Parallel announcements regarding the food-for-nuclear/missile freeze agreement are issued by the US and the DPRK.

: ROK and U.S. begin military joint exercise Key Resolve, which will last two weeks. DPRK has previously called these annual drills a provocative act.

: Special Representative Davies announces that the US and DPRK “made a little bit of progress” in talks aimed at finding ways to resume the Six-Party Talks.

: Glyn Davies, US special representative for North Korea policy, and DPRK Vice Foreign Minister Kim Gye Gwan meet in Beijing.

: South Korean and US navies hold a series of joint anti-submarine exercises in the Yellow Sea.

: South Korean Ambassador to the US Han Duck-soo announces his resignation.

: DPRK National Defense Commission says there are nine preconditions for resuming talks, including that ROK must apologize for failing to show proper respect regarding Kim Jong Il’s death.
Feb. 9, 2012: Democratic United Party and the United Progressive Party deliver letters to the US Embassy in Seoul threatening to repeal the KORUS FTA unless it is renegotiated.

: After meeting ROK Deputy Foreign Minister Kim Jae-shin and ROK nuclear envoy Lim Sung-nam in Seoul, Assistant Secretary Campbell says, “the road to improve relations [with Washington] run through Seoul for North Korea.”

: DPRK chastises ROK and the US for its recent military drills and warns against the joint military exercises planned for March.

: Iran’s Ambassador to ROK Ahmad Masumifar says in an interview with JoongAng Ilbo, “We can find our own customers and if Korea joins this sanction, Korea will be deprived of Iran’s market.”

: Robert Einhorn, US State Department special adviser for nonproliferation and arms control, meets ROK Deputy Foreign Minister Kim Jae-shin in Seoul and urges South Korea to help put more pressure on Iran.

: Assistant Secretary Campbell, Lim Sung-nam, ROK representative for Korea Peninsula peace and security affairs, and Japanese counterpart Sugiyama Shinsuke attend a trilateral meeting in Washington; they offer hope for restarting talks with for North Korea.

: ROK Prime Minister Kim Hwang-sik visits Oman and the United Arab Emirates as the US continues to urge South Korea to reduce its Iranian energy imports.

: DPRK releases a statement that it remains open to suspending uranium enrichment in exchange for US food aid.

: President Lee meets Chinese President Hu Jintao in Beijing to discuss strengthening economic ties and North Korean and peninsular stability.

: Kurt Campbell, assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, arrives in Seoul to discuss the situation on the Korean Peninsula following the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

: In his New Year’s message, ROK President Lee Myung-bak vows to deal strongly with any provocations from North Korea but keeps open the possibility of inter-Korean talks.

: DPRK holds a massive memorial service for Kim Jong Il and declares Kim Jong Un as the North’s “supreme leader.”

: DPRK leader Kim Jong Il’s funeral ceremony is held in Pyongyang.

: Lim Sung-nam, ROK’s chief negotiator to the Six-Party Talks, visits Washington and meets Special Representatives Davies and King to discuss next steps on North Korea.

: ROK National Assembly’s Foreign Affairs Committee adopts a resolution demanding renegotiation of KORUS FTA, especially for the modification, reversing or abolition of the Investor-State Dispute settlement clause.

: DPRK’s Rodong Sinmun calls Kim Jung Un head of the Worker’s Party’s Central Military Commission.

: The US says that it is willing to continue talks with the DPRK on possible food aid and the resumption of the Six-Party Talks after the death of Kim Jong Il.

: Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Lim Sung-nam meets Chinese counterpart Wu Dawei to discuss North Korea in the aftermath of Kim Jong Il’s death and ways to revive the Six-Party talks.

: President Lee says that the ROK does not want to show hostility to the DPRK and that it is willing to soften its official stance toward the DPRK as much as possible.

: ROK government expresses sympathy to the people of DPRK over the death of Kim Jong Il, but decides not to send an official condolence delegation to the communist nation.

: Secretary Clinton offers prayers to the people of DPRK while urging the country’s new leadership to follow “path of peace” following the death of Kim Jong Il.

: North Korean media report that DPRK leader Kim Jong Il died on Dec. 17.

: Yonhap reports that the US has agreed to provide up to 240,000 tons of food aid to North Korea based on North Korea’s pledge to implement initial measures of denuclearization that include a suspension of its uranium enrichment program.

: ROK imposes new sanctions on Iran, limiting financial deals with 99 Iranian groups and six individuals from the Middle Eastern country.

: ROK Trade Minister Kim Jong-hoon says that KORUS FTA could be delayed until next February.

:   US Special Envoy for North Korean Human rights Issues Robert King and senior USAID official Jon Brause meet DPRK Director General for American Affairs Ri Gun in Beijing to discuss food aid.

: ROK Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan says KORUS FTA could be delayed until after Jan. 1, as further consultations with the US may be needed.

: US Special Representative Davies and Clifford Hart, US envoy and chief representative to the Six-Party Talks, visit Seoul to meet ROK foreign minister, unification minister and national security adviser to discuss DPRK nuclear issues.

: Derek Mitchell, US special envoy to Burma, visits Seoul to brief ROK government officials on the background of Secretary Clinton’s visit to the country.

: US State Department Advisor for Nonproliferation and Arms Control Robert Einhorn visits Seoul to encourage the ROK to participate in mutual sanctions against Iran and to review the US-ROK Civil Nuclear Cooperation Agreement.

: Opposition parties in South Korea vows to continue their campaign against implementation of the KORUS FTA.

: US House Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific unanimously passes a resolution that calls on North Korea to disclose the whereabouts of and repatriate all those kidnapped during the Korean War.

: US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visits South Korea to attend the Fourth High-Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness held in Busan.

: President Lee signs 14 bills linked to the implementation of KORUS FTA.

: US and ROK agree to seek improvements to the Status of Forces Agreement following a series of crimes committed by US service personnel in Korea.

: KORUS FTA passes the ROK National Assembly with the ruling Grand National Party pushing a surprise floor vote.

: US Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman meets senior ROK officials in Seoul to discuss US-ROK alliance issues. 

: South Korea, Japan, and the US hold trilateral talks on the resumption of the stalled Six-Party Talks, at the East Asia Summit in Bali.

: ROK’s main opposition party the Democratic Party rejects President Lee’s offer to demand renegotiations with the US on KORUS FTA after ratification.

: President Lee promises to renegotiate the investor-state dispute (ISD) settlement provision with the US within three months after KORUS FTA passes in the National Assembly.

: President Lee attends the APEC forum held in Hawaii.

: ROK Special Representative Lim Sung-nam visits Vienna and meets US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Glyn Davies.

: ROK agrees to resume sending medical aid to DPRK through the World Health Organization.

: About 1,000 people hold a candlelight vigil in Seoul to protest the KORUS FTA.

: ROK Unification Minister Yu Woo-Ik visits the US and meets Deputy Secretary Burns and Sen. Joe Lieberman in an effort to strengthen coordination on North Korean affairs.

: ROK military conducts large-scale military exercise as US and ROK agree to complete joint operational plan against DPRK this year.

: Assistant Secretary Campbell visits Seoul to debrief ROK officials on the outcome of the US-DPRK talks in Geneva.

: US Defense Secretary Leon Panetta visits Seoul to attend the 43rd Security Consultative Meeting.

: Representatives from the US and North Korea meet in Geneva for what is described as a “continuation of the exploratory meetings.”

: State Department announces that current US Special Representative for North Korea policy Stephen Bosworth will be replaced by Glyn Davies.

: Members of the ROK Democratic Party storm the committee room at the National Assembly to prevent deliberations and a vote on the KORUS FTA bill.

: US and DPRK begin talks in Bangkok on resuming efforts to recover the remains of US soldiers killed during the Korean War.

: UN Humanitarian Chief Valerie Amos visits the DPRK to assess the chronic food shortage situation.

: President Lee Myung-bak makes state visit to the US, meets President Obama, delivers a speech before a joint session of Congress, and visits a GM plant in Michigan.

: ROK’s ruling party officials vow to approve KORUS FTA within the month even in the face of strong opposition from opposition parties.

: US Congress approves long-delayed KORUS FTA.

: Lim Sung-nam becomes South Korea’s special representative for peace and security affairs on the peninsula, which entails serving as ROK envoy to the Six-Party Talks.

: President Obama submits three pending free trade agreements with South Korea, Panama and Colombia to Congress for approval.

: US government issues an apology for the rape of a Korean girl by a US soldier stationed in South Korea.

: ROK Special Representative Wi Sung-Lac and DPRK Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Ri Yong Ho meet for a second round of talks aimed at restarting the Six-Party Talks.

: President Obama warns that DPRK will face “greater pressure and isolation” if it continues its nuclear weapons program and hostile actions against ROK.

: ROK Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin states that Seoul and Washington are discussing a revision of restrictions on the range of South Korean missiles.

: ROK ruling party presents KORUS FTA to a parliamentary committee as a first step toward its ratification.

: ROK sends a shipment of flood aid (200,000 packets of baby food) to DPRK.

: ROK’s Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Wi Sung-lac visits the US for consultations on the resumption of the Six-Party Talks.

: President Lee names Yu Woo-ik as the new unification minister and Hyun In-taek as special presidential advisor for unification policy.

: ROK rival parties agree to begin the ratification process for the Korea-US Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA) at the same pace with the US Congress.

: President Lee Myung-bak replaces Unification Minister Hyun In-taek with Yu Woo-ik, a former chief-of-staff to Lee and former ambassador to China.

: US announces it will provide emergency aid valued at $900,000 to North Korea.

: ROK and the US conduct the annual joint military exercise Ulchi Freedom Guardian in South Korea.

: State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland urges the DPRK to “exercise restraint” and says the US wants to see North Korea take steps along the lines they discussed in New York for the resumption of the Six-Party Talks.

: ROK National Security Adviser Chun Yung-woo meets US National Security Advisor Thomas Donilon and holds “very productive discussions on a wide range of bilateral, regional and global issues,” including a request to reconsider use of “Sea of Japan.” Chun also meets Deputy Secretary of State Bill Burns, with a brief attendance by Secretary Clinton.

: Three North Korean artillery shells fall in waters near Yeonpyeong Island. South Korean military returns fire.

: The US Department of Defense proposes a meeting with the DPRK to discuss recovering the remains of US soldiers from North Korea.

: US State Department confirms the policy of calling the waters between Korea and Japan the Sea of Japan; South Korea protests the decision.

: GNP members welcome Washington’s joint statement supporting passage of the KORUS FTA; lawmakers Nam Kyung-pil and Hwang Woo-yea state that the National Assembly should ratify the bill around the same time.

: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and his Republican counterpart Mitch McConnell issue a joint statement supporting passage of the trade agreements with Korea, Colombia and Panama after the August recess with the condition of assured passage of the TAA being separated from the FTA.

: Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan meets Special Envoy for DPRK Policy Stephen Bosworth in New York. Newly named Special Envoy for Six-Party Talks Clifford Hart and DPRK Human Rights Envoy Robert King also attend the meetings.

: Secretary Clinton says the US has invited Kim Kye Gwan, North Korean vice foreign minister, to New York for exploratory talks.

: North Korean Minister of Foreign Affairs Pak Ui Chun meets South Korean counterpart Kim Sung-hwan at the ASEAN Regional Forum.

: Secretary Clinton says at the ARF that the US will not support a resumption of Six-Party Talks unless the DPRK proves it is serious about the effort, adding that a private meeting between the North and South is not enough and the DPRK should cease its provocative actions, improve relations with the South, and begin dismantling its nuclear program.

: Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan, Secretary Clinton, and Japanese Foreign Minister Matsumoto Takeaki meet at the ARF to coordinate strategy toward North Korea.

: South Korean chief nuclear negotiator Wi Sung-lac and his newly-appointed North Korean counterpart Ri Yong Ho meet in a two-hour meeting on the sidelines of the ASEAN Regional Forum in Bali.

: The main opposition Democratic Party announces a list of 10 + 2 points to renegotiate, blocking the National Assembly’s ratification of the KORUS FTA.

: US Army Gen. James Thurman is inaugurated as the new commander of US Forces Korea, vowing to strengthen the alliance between Seoul and Washington.

: Park Ro-byug, South Korea’s envoy for the civil nuclear accord talks, meets Robert Einhorn, the US State Department’s special adviser for nonproliferation and arms control, for a third round of Korea-US talks on revising a bilateral nuclear cooperation pact.

: Secretary of State Clinton calls for an end to partisan strife over free trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia, and Panama in a speech at the US Global Leadership Coalition Conference in Washington.

: Lee Myung-bak administration and the new leadership of the ruling GNP party agree to ratify the KORUS FTA during the August legislative session.

: House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee hold simultaneous “mock mark-up” sessions on preliminary draft implementing bills for the three pending free trade agreements including KORUS.

: State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland says that the US “understands” and talked to the EU regarding its decision to provide North Korea with food aid but stresses that it will make its own decision on aid.

: Unification Ministry spokeswoman Lee Jong-joo says South Korea will not send any government food aid to North Korea.

: European Union Humanitarian Aid Commissioner Kristalina Georgieva says the EU will send 10 million euro ($14.5 million) in food aid to North Korea to save the lives of at least 650,000 people.

: US Forces Korea says only small amounts of cancer-causing dioxin were detected last year near one of its bases in the country, citing its draft report on the inspection.

: In South Korea, 15,000 protestors rally against the KORUS FTA and rising college tuition costs, taking over Kwanghwamun Street for the first time since 2009.

: Joongang Ilbo reports that the US pressured South Korea during several meetings between officials to actively engage with North Korea to resume inter-Korean dialogue.

: Secretary of State Clinton and ROK Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade Kim Sung-hwan meet and sign an agreement in Washington to better coordinate international development aid. They also agree to not ease pressure on North Korea’s government unless it changes its ways before resumption of stalled nuclear talks.

: Special Envoy for Six-Party Talks Sung Kim is officially nominated as US ambassador to the Republic of Korea.

: South Korea’s Six-Party Talks Envoy Wi Sung-lac meets Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg.

: Joongang Ilbo reports that Seoul has told Washington that it does not mind it sending food aid to North Korea, but only after North Korea agrees to talk with the South.

: US. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton says, following a meeting of the Japan-US Security Consultative Committee, that the US is “committed to deterring further provocative behaviors by North Korea, supporting a North-South dialogue, and promoting the complete and peaceful denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.”

:   Wi Sung-lac meets with Special Envoy Stephen Bosworth and Assistant Secretary Campbell in Washington to discuss security issues and resumption of Six-Party Talks.

: Clifford Hart is named US Special Envoy to the Six-Party Talks.

: State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland says the US is still looking for a new page in inter-Korean relations to come before all else in issues related to the two Koreas.

: Gen. Walter Sharp, outgoing commander of US Forces in Korea, says the US will not deploy tactical nuclear weapons to South Korea.

: Assistant Secretary of State Kurt Campbell meets Wi Sung-lac in Seoul and says the US supports South Korea’s position that inter-Korean talks must occur before talks between Washington and Pyongyang.

: US Secretary of Defense-designate Leon Panetta says he will work closely with Congress in pressing ahead with the realignment of troops stationed in South Korea.

: Eighth US Army Commander Lt. Gen. John Johnson tells Environment Minister Yoo Young-sook that drums of chemicals were removed from Korea in 1982-1983.

: South Korea’s Defense Ministry begins a large-scale investigation of former US military bases due to claims by retired US soldiers who say that they helped dump large amounts of the toxic chemical Agent Orange inside a US army camp in 1978.

: North Korea frees Jun Young Su, a US citizen held since November 2010.

: The US Navy halts a North Korea ship suspected of carrying arms to Myanmar, but the vessel denies permission to board. The ship turns around and heads back on May 29.

: Special Envoy for North Korean Human Rights Issues Robert King and USAID Deputy Assistant Administrator Jon Brause visit Pyongyang and meet First Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan, Vice Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho, and Director General for North American Affairs Ri Gun to assess food shortages in North Korea and discuss the status of a US citizen who is being held in a North Korean jail.

: South Korean and US air forces launch a joint exercise, Max Thunder.

: ROK government and the Grand National Party agree to try to pass South Korea’s free trade agreement with the US through a parliamentary committee beginning in June.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Stephen Bosworth, Special Envoy for Six-Party Talks Sung Kim, and Sydney Seiler, the new Korea policy chief at the National Security Council, visit Seoul and meet Foreign Minister Kim Sung-Hwan, Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Wi Sung-Lac, and Presidential Security Adviser Chun Young-Woo.

: US House Speaker John Boehner says he wants the pending free-trade deals with Korea, Colombia and Panama to pass Congress before August.

: Yonhap News reports that US Trade Representative (USTR) Ron Kirk wants Congress to approve the KORUS FTA “this spring.”

: Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus says he reached a deal with the Obama administration addressing his concerns with South Korea’s remaining beef import restrictions, clearing another roadblock on the Korea-US free trade agreement (KORUS FTA).

: ROK government withdraws the KORUS FTA bill from the National Assembly to deal with translation errors, which could delay its ratification for months.

: Former US President Jimmy Carter, former Finnish President Martti Ahtisaari, former Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Brundtland, and former Irish President Mary Robinson visit China, North Korea, and South Korea in an effort to “ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula.”

: The Obama administration dismisses calls from some senators to get wider access to South Korean beef markets in the pending KORUS FTA.

: Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan meets US House representatives Tom Reed (R-NY) and Karen Bass (D-CA) in Seoul to discuss the KORUS FTA.

: President Obama reinforces trade sanctions against North Korea that have been in place since 2006.

: Secretary Clinton meets President Lee in Seoul and affirms her certainty that the US will approve the pending KORUS FTA in relatively short order.

: ROK Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology announces that the ROK and the US have agreed to carry out a joint study on safe ways to store spent fuel.

: Secretary of State Clinton meets Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan in Seoul to discuss bilateral relations and coordinate North Korea policy.

: North Korea announces that it is preparing to indict a Korean-American who has been in captivity for “unauthorized religious activities.”

: US announces that it has signed a missile defense agreement with the ROK.

: State Department urges North Korea to release a US citizen who is currently being held in the North.

: Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Wi Sung-lac visits Washington and meets Special Representative for North Korea Policy Steven Bosworth and Special Envoy for Six-Party Talks Sung Kim to discuss North Korea issues.

: South Korea and the US open their first session of the Extended Deterrence Policy Committee in Hawaii.

: State Department affirms that former President Carter’s planned upcoming trip to Pyongyang will be a private, non-official matter.

: 12 North Korean economic officials depart on a 16-day tour of the US and its industry, dubbed by JoongAng as a “crash course in American-style capitalism.”

: Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs Wallace Gregson meets Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin in Seoul to discuss bilateral security issues.

: The US reaffirms that it will consult closely with South Korea before agreeing to resume food aid to North Korea.

: South Korea and the US begin their second round of talks regarding the renewal of their civil nuclear deal which is set to expire in 2014.

: ROK government announces that it has no plans to seek a return of US nuclear weapons to the Korean Peninsula, citing their 1991 joint denuclearization declaration with the North as the primary reason.

: US National Security Council (NSC) restates that it has no plans to deploy tactical nuclear weapons in South Korea.

: South Korea and US conduct the annual Foal Eagle/Key Resolve military exercises. Key Resolve is a computer-based simulation and runs through March 10. Foal Eagle is the field training portion of the exercise, and will continue through April 30.

: US Pacific Command Commander Adm. Robert Willard meets ROK Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Han Min-koo and other ROK military leaders in Seoul to discuss plans for the joint military exercise that will begin the following week.

: State Department dismisses North Korea’s proposal for bilateral engagement.

: State Department says it has no immediate plans to give food aid to North Korea.

: JoongAng Ilbo reports that China is opposing an effort by a United Nations sanctions committee to adopt a report on North Korea’s uranium enrichment program.

: South Korea and the US sign the supplementary KORUS FTA, paving the way for its ratification in both countries’ legislatures.

: North and South Korea hold colonel-level military talks in Panmunjom but fail to reach agreement on an agenda for higher level talks or a date for further preliminary talks.

: US Special Envoy for North Korean Human Rights Robert King visits Seoul to discuss human rights issues.

: Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell says “the essential first step in any process of reengagement with North Korea requires a true and significant North-South dialogue.”

: Deputy Secretary Steinberg travels to Beijing to meet Chinese State Counselor Dai Bingguo and discuss North Korea’s nuclear program.

: US Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg meets President Lee and Foreign Minister Kim in Seoul to brief them on the US-China summit and to discuss North Korea and the resumption of the Six-Party talks.

: During his State of the Union Address, President Obama urges North Korea to abandon nuclear weapons. He also holds up South Korea as a model when discussing education and infrastructure.

: Presidents Barack Obama and Hu Jintao release a Joint Statement and agree that North Korea must avoid further provocations and abide by its denuclearization commitments.

: Commander of US Forces in Korea (USFK) Gen. Walter Sharp warns of North Korea’s long-range missiles and says they must be destroyed if they pose a threat.

: South Korean National Security Advisor Chun Young-woo says on a PBS News Hour interview that North Korea must apologize for the Cheonan sinking and the Yeonpyeong shelling before engagement is possible between the two Koreas.

: Japanese Foreign Minister Maehara Seiji and President Lee meet in Seoul and call for the UN Security Council (UNSC) to deal with North Korea’s recently unveiled uranium enrichment program.

: Secretary Gates meets President Lee, Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin, and Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan in Seoul.

: South Korea and the US agree on a 10-year joint study to determine if Seoul should be allowed to reprocess spent nuclear fuel with a new, proliferation-resistant technology.

: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen states that North Korean nuclear and missile technology pose a serious threat to the US.

: Secretary Gates calls on North Korea to impose a moratorium on its missile and nuclear testing to help revive the Six-Party Talks.

: US Defense Secretary Robert Gates meets Chinese Minister of Defense Liang Guangjie in Beijing and discusses North Korean provocations and its nuclear program.

: Grand National Party (GNP) lawmaker Nam Kyung-pil calls on the Congress to ratify the KORUS FTA, and the South Korean National Assembly will then follow suit.

: US Special Envoy for North Korea Stephen Bosworth visits Seoul, Beijing, and Tokyo and meets “senior government officials to discuss next steps on the Korean Peninsula.”

: In his first major address of the year, President Lee Myung-bak gives a message to North Korea that the “The path toward peace is yet open. The door for dialogue is still open.”

: South Korea stages massive firing drills involving missiles, artillery, and fighter jets near the border with North Korea.

: KCNA says North Korea is ready to launch a “sacred war” against South Korea on the basis of its “nuclear deterrent.”

: North Korea and the US restore their New York dialogue channel.

: South Korea conducts a live-fire drill near Yeonpyeong Island. North Korea does not launch an attack, saying the drill was not worth a response.

: Gov. Richardson says North Korea has agreed to allow IAEA inspectors to monitor its nuclear facilities at Yongbyon and is willing to negotiate the sale of 12,000 spent nuclear fuel rods. State Department welcomes the news, but adds that it will heed actions, not words regarding the North’s denuclearization.

: UN Security Council meets in an emergency session, but fails to reach any agreement on ways to ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

: Russia expresses its extreme concern over South Korea’s upcoming drills and requests an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council. China also expresses its opposition to South Korea’s upcoming drills.

: North Korea warns of ‘catastrophe’ if South Korea conducts live-fire exercises near Yeonpyeong Island.

: South Korea announces that it will hold live-fire drills on Yeonpyeong Island.

: Chosun Ilbo reports that Kim Jong Il said during a meeting with State Counselor Dai Bingguo that he was willing to consider allowing International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspections into the DPRK.

: North Korea’s Foreign Ministry states that the DPRK “supports all proposals for dialogue including the Six-Party Talks prompted by the desire to prevent a war and realize denuclearization on the Korean Peninsula.”

: New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson visits Pyongyang for an unofficial diplomatic mission at the invitation of DPRK negotiator Kim Gye-gwan.

: Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg leads a delegation to Beijing to discuss Northeast Asian security and developments on the Korean Peninsula.

: ROK negotiator Wi Sung-lac visits Moscow to meet his Russian counterpart, Deputy Foreign Minister Alexei Borodavkin.

: Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin urges North Korea to “unconditionally comply with UN Security Council resolutions” on its nuclear development.

: The US and the ROK form the Extended Deterrence Policy Committee, a joint committee to make decisions about the alliance’s nuclear and extended deterrence policies.

: Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov denounces North Korea for shelling Yeonpyeong Island.

: North Korean foreign minister says US and South Korean actions are forcing Pyongyang to strengthen its nuclear deterrent.

: Kim Jong Il meets Chinese State Counselor Dai Bingguo in Pyongyang.

: South Korean JCS Chairman Han Min-koo visits Yeonpyeong Island, and claims that the ROK “will completely crush the enemy” if the North attacks again.

: Chairman of the JCS Adm. Mullen meets with South Korean JCS Chairman Gen. Han Min-koo in Seoul.

: Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan, Secretary of State Clinton, and Japanese Foreign Minister Maehara Siji hold a trilateral meeting in Washington to discuss North Korea’s latest provocations and release a joint statement.

: According to the White House, President Obama asks President Hu Jintao “to send a clear message to North Korea that its provocations are unacceptable.”

: President Lee calls for the early ratification of the revised KORUS FTA.

: US and South Korea finalize a supplementary agreement on the KORUS FTA.

: US Senate passes a resolution condemning North Korea for its attack on Yeonpyeong Island.

: On the sidelines of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) summit in Kazakhstan, Secretary Clinton and Foreign Minister Kim agree that the Six-Party Talks should resume only after North Korea takes concrete steps demonstrating its commitment to give up its nuclear programs.

: The US House of Representatives passes a resolution condemning North Korea for the shelling of Yeonpyeong Island.

: South Korea and the US hold KORUS FTA talks in Columbia, Maryland.

: President Lee makes his first major address to the nation following the Yeonpyeong Island artillery attack and rejects China’s proposal for convening an emergency meeting of the Six-Party Talks. The US State Department echoes Lee’s rejection.

: China proposes emergency consultations with members of the Six-Party Talks.

: South Korea and the US conduct naval exercises off of the west coast of the Korean Peninsula with the aircraft carrier USS George Washington.

: Chinese State Counselor Dai Bingguo makes a sudden visit to Seoul to meet President Lee.

: The DPRK accuses the US of creating confrontation between the divided Koreas to increase its military presence in the region.

: North Korea threatens a “shower of fire” in response to the joint US-ROK naval exercises in the Yellow Sea.

: US Forces Korea (USFK) Commander Gen. Walter Sharp visits Yeonpyeong Island to survey the damage of the artillery attacks.

: President Lee names Kim Kwan-jin as minister of defense.

: Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi expresses Beijing’s concern over the upcoming US-ROK joint exercises in the Yellow Sea.

: Chairman of the JCS Adm. Mike Mullen urges China to pressure North Korea to refrain from provoking South Korea and to abide by its denuclearization commitments.

: Secretary Clinton reassures the ROK of the US commitment to the alliance.

: North Korea rejects talks with the UNC on the Yeonpyeong artillery shelling.

: South Korean Defense Minister Kim Tae-young resigns.

: The State Department urges China to influence North Korea to reduce tensions after the Yeonpyeong attack.

: The UNC proposes holding general-level military talks with North Korea to discuss the North’s artillery attack on Yeonpyeong.

: The ROK Defense Ministry and Blue House rule out redeployment of US tactical nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula.

: Special Envoy Bosworth travels to Beijing to meet his counterparts over the DPRK’s uranium enrichment facility and the possibility of the resuming the Six-Party Talks.

: North Korea fires approximately 100 artillery rounds on and around Yeonpyeong Island in the Yellow Sea.  President Obama denounces North Korea for the attack, consults with President Lee, and agrees that a first response will be to hold joint military exercises.

: Special Envoy Bosworth meets Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan and ROK negotiator Wi Sung-lac in Seoul. He also meets his Japanese counterpart in Tokyo to discuss the most recent revelations regarding the DPRK uranium enrichment facility.

: Defense Secretary Gates denounces North Korea for violating UN resolutions with its uranium enrichment facility.

: US Special Envoy for North Korea Stephen Bosworth travels to Seoul to discuss the resumption of the Six-Party Talks with South Korean counterparts.

: According to Yonhap, South Korea expresses “very grave” concern following a news report that North Korea has an operational uranium enrichment plant.

: According to Chosun Ilbo, Defense Secretary Gates says that North Korea’s new uranium enrichment plant gives the North the potential to build more nuclear bombs.

: Chairman of the JCS Adm. Mullen denounces the DPRK for seeking a uranium-based nuclear program in violation of its agreement to denuclearize.

: The New York Times reports that Siegfried Hecker was shown a highly sophisticated uranium enrichment facility during his recent visit to North Korea.

:  South Korean Six-Party Talks negotiator Wi Sung-lac meets his Japanese counterpart Akitaka Saiki in Tokyo.

:  According to Yonhap, the US Treasury Department blacklists two more North Korean firms managing slush funds for the North Korean leadership and other economic activities banned under UN resolutions and US domestic laws.

: Presidents Obama and Lee meet on the sidelines of the G20 in Seoul to discuss the KORUS FTA, North Korea, and resumption of the Six-Party Talks. They announce that they were unable to reach on the KORUS FTA and that negotiations will continue.

: A report by UN experts charging North Korea with supplying nuclear technology to Syria, Iran, and Myanmar, which had been blocked by China for six months, is submitted to the UN Security Council for consideration.

: US Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) Adm. Mike Mullen reiterates the US pledge to send an aircraft carrier into the Yellow Sea for joint drills with the ROK in the near future, despite objections from China.

: USTR Kirk and ROK Trade Minister Kim meet to address pending issues regarding the KORUS FTA.

: In a New York Times Op-ed, President Obama states, “President Lee Myung-bak and I will work to complete a trade pact that could be worth tens of billions of dollars in increased exports and thousands of jobs for American workers.”

: Assistant USTR for Korea, Japan, and APEC Affairs Wendy Cutler and Korean Deputy Minister for Trade Choi Seok-young hold working-level discussions on the KORUS FTA in Seoul.

: The UNC announces that it will begin an on-site investigation into the exchange of gunfire between the two Koreas at the border.

: President Lee Myung-bak and Secretary Clinton meet in Hanoi on the sidelines of the East Asia Summit.

: South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan meets separately with Secretary Clinton and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in Hanoi.

: North Korea fires two rounds toward South Korea and South Korean troops immediately return fire.

: In a speech given in Honolulu, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton refers to the US-Korea alliance as a “lynchpin” of peace and security in the region.

: The United Nations Command (UNC) and the Korean People’s Army hold a 90-minute colonel-level meeting in Panmunjom regarding the Cheonan incident.

: US Trade Representative (USTR) Ron Kirk and South Korean Trade Minister Kim Jong-hoon meet in San Francisco in an effort to finalize details of the KORUS FTA.

: South Korea and the US begin formal talks on renewing their civilian nuclear agreement, which is set to expire in 2014.

: The Pentagon announces it will postpone planned joint naval drills in the Yellow Sea with the ROK, but adds that China had nothing to do with the decision.

: US Special Envoy for North Korean Human Rights Robert King calls on Pyongyang to improve human rights conditions for the betterment of bilateral ties.

: South Korean parliamentarians and members of the US Congress send letters to their respective presidents asking for “meaningful changes” to the pending KORUS FTA.

: North Korea strongly criticizes the PSI maritime exercise hosted by Seoul.

: US State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley announces that the US will not lift sanctions on North Korea to lure it back to the Six-Party Talks.

: North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) announces that Pyongyang is ready to follow through on a September 2005 agreement to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.

: South Korea hosts a multinational Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) maritime exercise off of the coast of Pusan.

: North Korea’s lead Six-Party Talks negotiator Kim Gye-Gwan meets Chinese Vice Foreign Minister and chief negotiator at the Six-Party Talks Wu Dawei in Beijing.

: Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister and chief Russian negotiator at the Six-Party Talks Alexei Borodavkin travels to Seoul to meet Wi Sung-lac, South Korea’s lead negotiator for Six-Party Talks, and Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan.

: North Korean defector Hwang Jang-yop dies at his home in Seoul of an apparent heart attack at the age of 87.

: South Korean Defense Minister Kim Tae-young meets Defense Secretary Robert Gates in Washington for an annual Security Consultative Meeting (SCM).

: Secretary Campbell visits Seoul for talks on a wide range of issues.

: US Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell visits Tokyo to discuss strategies to deal with North Korea.

: US Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) Leon Panetta makes a surprise visit to Seoul to discuss North Korean succession with President Lee Myung-bak.

: North Korea holds the Workers’ Party of Korea Conference.

: Kim Jong-un is named Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission of the Korean Workers’ Party.

: South Korea and the US launch joint anti-submarine military exercises in the Yellow Sea.

:  Kim Jong-un and Kim Kyong-hui are promoted to the rank of general in the Korean People’s Army.

: White House spokesman Robert Gibbs says that North Korea will continue to face strong punitive sanctions unless it abides by its commitment to denuclearize.

: Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee, making it clear that the State Department won’t get ahead of Seoul in engaging North Korea.

: The Chicago Council on the Global Affairs releases a new report on U.S. attitudes towards the Republic of Korea.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Stephen Bosworth visits Seoul and meets with his counterparts.

: California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger visits Seoul and calls on the US Congress to pass the KORUS FTA.

: North Korea’s ruling party delays the start of a rare conference of the ruling Workers’ Party.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Stephen Bosworth and Special Envoy for Six-Party Talks Sung Kim meet Japanese diplomat Akitaka Saiki in Tokyo.

: US Special Representative for North Korea Policy Stephen Bosworth and US Special Envoy for the Six-Party Talks Sung Kim arrive in Seoul to meet with Shin Kak-soo, the acting foreign minister, and Wi Sung-lac, the ROK’s chief nuclear envoy.

: ROK Foreign Ministry spokesman Kim Young-sun announces new sanctions on Iran over its disputed nuclear program. State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley says that the US welcomes the South Korean government’s decision to impose sanctions on Iran.

: North Korea releases the Southern squid boat Daeseung 55 and its crew of seven on humanitarian grounds. They sail back to Sokcho port.

: ROK top nuclear envoy Wi Sung-lac visits Washington and meets US counterparts to discuss the North Korean issue.

: China starts a four-day artillery exercise in waters off Qingdao.

: President Obama signs an executive order mandating new financial sanctions on North Korea.

: Former President Carter leaves North Korea with US detainee Aijalon Gomes.

: China’s Special Representative on the Korean Peninsula Affairs Wu Dawei visits Seoul to discuss ways to resume the Six-Party Talks.

: Former President Jimmy Carter arrives in Pyongyang on a mission to release Ajalon Gomes detained in North Korea.

: South Korea and the US conduct the annual Ulchi Freedom Guardian (UFG) exercise, a computer-based simulation involving about 56,000 ROK and 30,000 US troops.

: President Obama issues a statement congratulating the Republic of Korea on the 65th anniversary of its independence from Japan.

: A fourth round of talks at Panmunjom ends without progress.

: DPRK fires some 130 rounds of artillery into the Yellow Sea near its border with the South.

: South Korean government officials express concern that US sanctions on Iran will hurt Korean firms.

: South Korea kicks off one of its largest-ever naval exercises on in the Yellow Sea near the disputed western sea border with North Korea.

: Special Advisor for Nonproliferation and Arms Control Robert Einhorn and Treasury Deputy Assistant Secretary for Terrorist Financing and Financial Crimes Daniel Glaser visit Seoul to discuss new US sanctions on North Korea.

: Military officials from North Korea and the UNC hold their third round of talks since the sinking of the Cheonan.

: The US and South Korea conduct a large-scale naval exercise codenamed Invincible Spirit in the Sea of Japan, that includes the aircraft carrier USS George Washington and 20 other ships and submarines, 100 aircraft, and 8,000 personnel from the US and ROK armed services.

: The UNC and North Korea hold a colonel-level meeting in Panmunjom.

: The inaugural US-South Korea “two plus two” security talks are held in Seoul with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Defense Secretary Robert Gates, and ROK Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan and Defense Minister Kim Tae-young as lead participants.

: Military officials from North Korea and UNC hold talks at Panmunjom.

: United Nations Security Council releases a Presidential Statement on the sinking of the Cheonan, which condemned the attack but does not directly blame North Korea.

: China’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang says that China “resolutely opposes” joint naval exercises that South Korea and the US plan to conduct in the Yellow Sea.

: DPRK threatens to start a “death-defying war” if the UN Security Council adopts any statement that blames North Korea for the sinking of the Cheonan.  

: DPRK refuses to discuss the Cheonan incident with the United Nations Command (UNC) Military Armistice Commission.

: ROK Foreign Ministry spokesman Kim Young Sun states that South Korea rejects North Korea’s proposal for direct military talks on the Cheonan incident.

: South Korea turns down North Korea’s proposal to hold direct military talks concerning the sinking of the South Korean warship Cheonan, stating that this situation should be dealt with under the Korean Armistice Agreement.

:  In response to the statement made by China’s Foreign Ministry on June 29, State Department spokesman Crowley, says, “We [the US] continue our discussions with China and other countries in New York, but we think at this point there’s little ambiguity, and we believe the international community needs to send a direct and clear message to North Korea.”

: Reps. Dave Reichert (R-WA), Adam Smith (D-WA), and four other congressmen launch a working group for early ratification of the KORUS FTA.

: Trade Minister Kim announces that South Korea will not renegotiate to make changes to the original KORUS FTA.

: North Korea refutes criticism made by G8 over the sinking of Cheonan.

: North Korea announces that any accidental clash during an upcoming US-ROK naval exercise could spark a war.

:  Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang says China is more cautious in handling North Korea than the US since it has “direct and serious concerns” related to North Korea.

: State Department spokesman Philip Crowley says the US considers the sinking of Cheonan to be “provocative,” but not an act of terrorism.

: KCNA reports that North Korea will strengthen its nuclear capability in a new way, in response to US policy and military threats.

: President Obama says, the “main focus” of the US is “making sure” that there is “a crystal clear acknowledgement [in the UN Security Council] that North Korea engaged in belligerent behavior that is unacceptable to the international community.”

: In their summit statement, the G8 leaders state: “We deplore the attack on March 26 that caused the sinking of the Republic of Korea’s naval vessel, the Cheonan, resulting in tragic loss of 46 lives.”

: Presidents Lee and Obama hold a bilateral meeting before the G20 Summit in Toronto. At the meeting, they decide to delay Seoul’s scheduled takeover of wartime operation control of its troops (OPCON) to Dec. 1, 2015.

: President Obama says he will push for ratification of the KORUS FTA before the next G20 Summit in Seoul in November.

: Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) calls on China to join the US and other members of the Security Council in “condemning North Korea’s recent aggression against South Korea.” Sen. Dick Lugar (R-IN) says that “Beijing is apparently strengthening its assistance to North Korea, even after the sinking of South Korea’s ship and loss of 46 sailors.”

: Speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi says Congress may not be able to ratify the pending KORUS FTA deal between the US and South Korea until next year.

: The State Department renews its demand from North Korea to release Aijalon Gomes, a US citizen imprisoned in North Korea since January, 2010.

: Foreign Minister Yu says that South Korea will consult related countries on resuming Six-Party Talks after completing its response to the Choenon incident.

: Secretary Clinton and Japan’s Foreign Minister Okada Katsuya pledge to pursue a “strong response” at the UN over North Korea’s involvement in the Cheonan incident.

: President Obama announces that the US will extend its current sanctions regime on North Korea by one more year, arguing that the “existence and the risk of proliferation of weapons-usable fissile material on the Korean Peninsula continued to posed an unusual and extraordinary threat” to the US.

: South Korean Army troops arrive in Afghanistan for the first time since withdrawing after a spate of kidnappings in 2007.

: South Korea and North Korea both speak before the UN Security Council. The Joint Investigation Group presents its findings and conclusion that North Korea deliberately attacked and sank Cheonan; North Korea rebuts the accusation by citing “major doubts” and “loopholes” in the credibility of the report.

: South Korea’s military undergoes major personnel changes following the release of a state auditor report about its “poor” handling of immediate aftermath of Cheonan.

: North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reports “the attempt to resume the psychological warfare” is equal to a “full-out war declaration,” that will induce “military attacks on all battle fronts.” It says that the North’s attack will not be “a proportional one-on-one response but a merciless attack that can involve turning Seoul into a sea of fire.”

: Defense Minister Kim announces that South Korea will resume its psychological warfare after the UN Security Council carries out its action over the sinking of Cheonan. In a national assembly hearing in Seoul, Kim says “[the broadcasters] are on hold because South Korea and the US both think it is better that they start after UN Security Council measures.”

: North Korea writes to the UN Security Council, claiming that the “investigation findings’ by the United States and South Korea, which had been from their announcement subject to doubts and criticism, is nothing more than a conspiracy aimed at achieving US political and military goals.” North Korea requests an opportunity to present a rebuttal against the findings of the multinational investigative committee regarding the Cheonan incident.

: In a forum on inter-Korean relations hosted by the National Unification Advisory Council, Vice Unification Minister, Eom Jong-sk, asserts that South Korea will not return to the Six-Party Talks until North Korea pays its price for the Cheonan Incident.

: Secretary Gates asserts that, “the international community can and must hold North Korea accountable. The United States will continue to work with the Republic of Korea, Japan and our other partners to figure out the best way to do that.”

: President Lee Myung-bak writes the UN Security Council regarding the Cheonan incident, asking the body to “take action” against North Korea.

: South Korea’s ruling Grand National Party suffers unexpected setbacks in nationwide local and provincial (i.e., midterm) elections.

: Adm. Michael Mullen, chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, warns South Korea that North Korea may engage in “follow-up activities” to the Cheonan incident.

: Premier Wen “expresses his condolences to the South Korean people and the family members of the victims for the unfortunate incident.” Premier Wen also urges haste in establishing a free trade agreement between China and South Korea.

: China’s Premier Wen Jiabao pledges that China “will not patronize anyone” responsible for the sinking of Cheonan.  The State Department calls on China to “support international efforts and South Korea as we consider appropriate action in the Security Council in the coming days.”

: President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Hatoyama Yukio reaffirm their support for South Korea’s proposal to bring the Cheonan incident to the UN Security Council.

: Secretary Clinton says that “international independent investigation [on the Choenan Incident] was objective, the evidence overwhelming, the conclusion inescapable.” She further states, “We call on North Korea to halt its provocation and its policy of threats and belligerence toward its neighbors, and take steps now to fulfill its denuclearization commitments, and comply with international law.”

: South Korea conducts antisubmarine warfare (ASW) drills in the Yellow Sea.

: Defense Minister Kim Tae-young announces that South Korea will conduct “anti-proliferation exercises” in the Korean peninsula on its own as well as in coordination with the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI).

: President Obama pledges his support for South Korea’s proposal to bring the matter of the Cheonan sinking to the UN Security Council.

: The Pentagon announces that the US Navy and the ROK Navy will conduct joint anti-submarine warfare (ASW) exercises in the “near future.”

: President Lee Myung-bak delivers a televised address demanding an apology from North Korea and outlining his government’s proposed response.

: MND formally accuses North Korea of attacking and sinking Cheonan.

: North Korea’s National Defense Commission announces that it intends to send a verification team to South to disprove the evidence of the Cheonan investigation.

: The US House of Representatives passes Resolution 1382, “expressing sympathy to the families of those killed by North Korea in the sinking of the Republic of Korea Ship Cheonan, and solidarity with the Republic of Korea in the aftermath of this tragic incident.”

: Secretary Clinton says during a visit to Tokyo that “overwhelming evidence” indicates that North Korea deliberately attacked and sank Cheonan.

: Trade Minister Kim Jong-hoon, announces the US will “likely move to ratify the pending free trade deal with South Korea [only] after … elections in November.”

: South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff reports that two North Korean patrol boats crossed into South Korea territorial waters in the Yellow Sea in two separate incidents and retreated after being fired upon by the Republic of Korea Navy.

: Lee Sang-woo, chairman of South Korea’s Presidential Commission on National Security, argues that the transfer of wartime operational control (OPCON) from the US to South Korea, originally scheduled for 2012, should be delayed.

: Senators John Kerry (D-MA) and Richard Lugar (R-IN), chairmen of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, send a letter to President Obama calling for ratification of the pending South Korea-US (KORUS) FTA.

: The US Senate passes Resolution 525 expressing “sympathy and condolences to the families … of the sailors of the Cheonan killed in action” and “solidarity with the people and government of the Republic of Korea.”

: South Korea holds a state funeral for the 46 dead and missing sailors from Cheonan at Pyeongtaek Naval Base.

: Recovery operators raise the remaining half of Cheonan.

: North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency reports that the country’s Foreign Ministry has offered to “join international efforts for nuclear nonproliferation and on nuclear material security on an equal footing with other nuclear weapons states.” The US Department of State declares that Washington “will not accept” such an accord.

: South Korea’s Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan, states that evidence of North Korea’s involvement in Cheonan incident would further hinder progress on the already stalemated Six-Party Talks, should any such evidence be found.

: President Lee declares that he will “resolutely and unwaveringly cope with the results” of the investigation of the sinking of Cheonan in a televised address to the country.

: North Korea denies involvement in its first official statement regarding the Cheonan incident.

: Yoon Duk-yong, the co-leader of the official state investigation team, affirms that an “external explosion” sank the Cheonan after surveying the recovered wreck of the vessel.

: Salvage workers raise the stern of Cheonan and recover 36 bodies from the wreck. Eight sailors remain missing.

: President Lee arrives in Washington for the Nuclear Security Summit.

: Secretary of Defense Robert Gates announces that the US will leave “all options … on the table” vis-à-vis North Korea, including the use of nuclear weapons, because of their “failure to comply with the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.”

: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says that North Korea may have up to six nuclear weapons.

: South Korean Ministry of National Defense (MND) announces that in addition to the US, the United Kingdom, Australia, and Sweden have also agreed to participate in the investigation into the Cheonan incident.

: North Korea sentences Aijalon Mahli Gomes, a US citizen and formerly an English teacher in South, to eight years of “hard labor” for “illegally entering the country.”

: South Korea requests US participation in the official investigation into the Cheonan incident.

: US Trade Representative Robert Kirk announces that President Obama wants Congress to approve “at least one of three pending free trade deals with [South] Korea, Colombia, and Panama” in 2010.

: President Barack Obama “offers his condolences” to President Lee Myung-bak and pledges US military support to the rescue operations.

: ROK’s Yonhap reports that Secretary of State Clinton has acknowledged that the DPRK possesses nuclear weapons.

: Kim Sung-chan, South Korea’s Chief of Naval Operations, says that Cheonan did not sink from an internal explosion but from “a powerful outside pressure or explosion.”

: ROK Defense Minister Kim Tae-young says, “North Korea may have intentionally floated underwater mines to inflict damage on us.”

: ROK officials rule out that an accident or collision with a reef caused the Cheonan to sink. Defense Minister Kim Tae-young suggests that one of the many DPRK sea mines placed during the Korean War could have sparked the explosion that sunk the Cheonan.

: DPRK accuses the US and the ROK of creating provocations by allowing tourists and journalists into the Demilitarized Zone. The DPRK demands an end to the tours, calling them part of a pattern of “psychological warfare” and warning of “unpredictable incidents including the loss of human lives in this area for which the US side will be wholly to blame.”

: US State Department spokesman Crowley says that the US has no evidence that DPRK is involved in the sinking of Cheonan.

: An explosion breaks Republic of Korea Navy vessel Cheonan in half and causes it to sink in the Yellow Sea near the disputed ROK-DPRK maritime border.

: In comment on KCNA, the DPRK military threatens “unprecedented nuclear strikes” over a report that the US and ROK are preparing for possible instability in the DPRK.

: Gen. Sharp suggests discussions at the “highest levels” of the ROK and US governments over delaying the handover of full control of ROK troops to Seoul in 2012 at a hearing of the Senate Committee on Armed Services. Adm. Robert Willard, commander of the US Pacific Command, says that the US is ready to transfer the wartime command control of the ROK troops to Seoul as scheduled in 2012.

: ROK warship Cheonan splits apart near the maritime border with the DPRK and sinks after an explosion in the rear hull. The cause of the explosion remains unclear, and officials say it could take weeks to determine.

:  Korean Central News Agency announces that the DPRK will put on trial a US citizen identified as Aijalon Mahli Gomes, who entered the country illegally.

:  Yonhap news agency reports that Pak Nam Gi, the ruling Workers’ Party finance and planning department chief who spearheaded the currency reform in the DPRK, was executed by a firing squad in Pyongyang.

: Korea Times reports that a US Joint Forces Command report says that the ROK, like Japan, has the technology to build a nuclear arsenal quickly if it decides to do so.

: Chosun Ilbo reports that Assistant Secretary of State Kurt Campbell told US Ambassador Kathleen Stephens, an ROK lawmaker, and activists in a closed-door session that he doubted Kim Jong-il would live beyond 2013.

:   ROK Defense Minister Kim Tae-young says that the DPRK has increased its missile arsenal by 25 percent in the past two years to about 1,000.

: Asahi Shimbun reports the US has asked the ROK to put a regional defense system against ballistic missiles on the agenda for security talks between the two countries.

: Korea Herald reports that revision of a 1974 nuclear energy agreement between the ROK and the US is expected to be critical to the development of the alliance as Seoul explores ways to reuse its mounting nuclear waste.

: ROK government official says that the US has hired a US think tank to gauge public opinion in the ROK on the proposed delay of handing wartime OPCON to Seoul.

:  Gen. Sharp says that US troops who would be tasked with eliminating the DPRK’s weapons of mass destruction in the event of armed conflict are participating in the current Key Resolve-Foal Eagle US-ROK military exercise.

: South Korean Prime Minister Chung Un-chan speaks at the Summit of Honor on Atoms for Peace and Environment (SHAPE), and reiterates Seoul’s intention to pyroprocess spent nuclear fuel.

: The US and the ROK begin their annual joint military exercise.

:  Korean Central Broadcasting Station denounces the annual Key Resolve-Foal Eagle US-ROK military exercise saying it would indefinitely suspend denuclearization talks and all military dialogue as long as the “hostile war games” continue.

: US Special Envoy Bosworth says that the US and China agreed to boost diplomatic drives to resume the stalled Six-Party Talks “as soon as we can.”

: In a speech to the Conference on Disarmament, DPRK diplomat Jon Yong Ryong says, “The nuclear issue on the Korean peninsula should be settled between the DPRK and the US from every aspect as it is a product of the hostile policy of the US toward the DPRK.”

: ROK National Assembly approves a government proposal to send 350 troops to protect ROK civilian aid workers in Afghanistan. The troops will be deployed in central Parwan province from July 2010 to the end of 2012.

: Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) reports that Stanford specialists are working with doctors from Pyongyang’s Ministry of Public Health to develop that country’s first diagnostic laboratory for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

: US Special Envoy Bosworth says he is “confident” that Six-Party Talks will resume after meeting Wu Dawei, his Chinese counterpart, in Beijing.

: ROK Defense Minister Kim Tae-young says he hopes the US security umbrella would remain intact for a long time.

: Korean Central News Agency says the DPRK’s “nuclear deterrent for self-defense will remain as ever and grow more powerful … as long as the US nuclear threat and hostile policy persist.”

:  Korea Central News Agency reports the DPRK will seek to end hostile relations with the US through “dialogue and negotiation” and also push to mend ties and unite with the ROK by promoting reconciliation and cooperation.

: After his four-day trip to North Korea, UN Undersecretary for Political Affairs Lynn Pascoe says the DPRK is not eager to return to the Six-Party Talks.

: Chosun Ilbo reports that a Gallup poll shows ROK citizens believe that the US-ROK alliance has become stronger since the inauguration of the Lee Myung-bak administration.

: State Department spokesman Crowley says Kim Jong-il’s declaration that he is committed to shelving the country’s nuclear weapons program must be followed by action to rejoin international negotiations.

: In an interview with CNN, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says the Obama administration will continue engaging the DPRK to convince it to return to the Six-Party Talks.

: DPRK announces US missionary Robert Park would be released after admitting that he entered the country illegally and showed “sincere repentance” for the transgression.

: Officials at a House Armed Services Committee hearing say the US will mobilize additional forces to send to the ROK in case of a DPRK regime collapse or other contingency.

: State Department spokesman Crowley says the DPRK’s proliferation of weapons of mass destruction could result in relisting as a state sponsor of terrorism.

: US Defense Department report claims the ROK is interested in participating in a US-led ballistic missile defense system, but Seoul denies any concrete commitment.

: President Obama certifies that the DPRK would remain off the US list of terrorist states, despite some calls from Congress for the state to be put back on.

: Director of National Intelligence Dennis Blair says in testimony before Congress that the DPRK relies on its nuclear weapons program because of a crumbling military that cannot compete with the ROK.

: US Forces Korea Commander Gen. Walter Sharp says US troop levels in the ROK will remain unchanged after Seoul takes back the wartime operational control of its troops.

: US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates says at a hearing of the House Armed Services Committee that additional US ground forces may not be able to arrive in ROK in time in case of an emergency situation in DPRK due to US commitments in Iraq and Afghanistan.

: Lt. Gen. Benjamin Mixon, commander of US Army, Pacific, says the US wants to organize trilateral military exercises with the ROK and Japan to better deal with disaster relief and humanitarian assistance.

:  Rodong Simun urges the US to give up the Cold War mindset and conclude a peace treaty.

: Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg expresses US support for President Lee Myung-bak’s proposal to meet DPRK leader Kim Jong-il.

: ROK and the US agree to conduct a feasibility study on pyroprocessing.

: President Obama says he will move for congressional approval of pending free trade deals with the ROK, Colombia, and Panama.

: State Department spokesman Crowley dismisses a DPRK offer to reopen talks on finding US soldiers missing since the Korean War, saying Pyongyang must first resume discussions on ending its nuclear ambitions.

: US President Barack Obama in the State of the Union Address calls on DPRK and Iran to abandon their nuclear ambitions, warning of stronger sanctions if they continue to pursue atomic weapons in violation of international accords.

: Korean Central News Agency reports that DPRK detained a US citizen for illegally entering the country from China on Jan. 24.

: Adm. Robert Willard, commander of US Pacific Command, says the DPRK appears willing to resume the search for the remains of missing US service members on its soil.

: US State Department spokesman Philip Crowley denounces the DPRK for escalating tensions by firing artillery shells along the disputed western sea border.

: DPRK announces a shipping exclusion zone off part of its west coast.

: Korea Times reports that the ROK is moving to hold behind-the-scenes discussions with the US in a bid to amend an agreement on cooperation in nuclear energy.

: US Navy announces it assisted of a DPRK-flagged ship in the Gulf of Aden.

: US Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell says the Obama administration will work closely with ROK toward congressional approval of the KORUS FTA at a hearing before a Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee.

: Korea Times reports that United States Forces Korea (USFK) will not pay for the cleanup of Camp Hialeah in Busan. Civic groups blame the ROK government for failing to get the USFK to share cleanup costs.

: Yonhap reports that the ROK defense minister said the proposed transfer of wartime operational control (OPCON) to ROK is scheduled for the “worst” possible time.

: Chosun Ilbo reports that senior officials in the U.S. administration, congressmen, and staff see nearly no prospect for the ratification of the ROK-US free trade agreement by the US Congress, according to a group of ROK  lawmakers following a visit to Washington.

: ROK Trade Minister Kim Jong-hoon says that the ROK government will not respond if the US repeats its demand to amend a bilateral free trade accord.

: Rodong Sinmun, the newspaper of DPRK Workers’ Party, calls for the withdrawal of US troops from ROK.

: In a conversation with ROK Internet users, Special Envoy King says the DPRK should follow in the footsteps of Russia and China and open its economic and political systems to improve conditions for its people. He also says the US will not normalize ties with a country that systematically abuses the rights of its people.

: US Special Envoy for the DPRK Stephen Bosworth says, “When North Korea comes back to Six-Party Talks and resumes making progress for the goal of denuclearization, the Security Council will examine the appropriateness of a revision of the sanctions resolution.”

: DPRK says it will allow in more US tourists after years of heavy restrictions on visits, according to the Koryo Group, a tour operator that specializes in DPRK tourism.

: DPRK Ambassador to China Choe Jin-su says that the DPRK will not return to nuclear disarmament negotiations unless the US agrees to peace treaty talks and lifts sanctions.

: Robert King, the US special envoy for DPRK rights issues, says the DPRK must improve its “appalling” human rights record if it wants better relations with the US.

: White House spokesman Robert Gibb dismisses the DPRK’s call for talks on a peace treaty to formally end the Korean War before addressing the issue of dismantling Pyongyang’s nuclear programs.

: DPRK Foreign Ministry says that the resumption of the Six-Party Talks depends on building confidence between Pyongyang and Washington and calls for a peace treaty.

: A senior US State Department official says that the US would welcome a visit to China by DPRK leader Kim Jong-il.

: KCNA rejects Lee Myung-bak’s “grand bargain” idea unless the ROK first discards confrontational policies.

: U.S. Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg travels to Korea as part of week-long Asia tour.

: President Obama says that Iran and the DPRK “must be held accountable” if they continue to put their pursuit of nuclear weapons ahead of international security.

: State Department spokesman Ian Kelly reiterates that the U.S. will provide a package of incentives to the DPRK if it takes irreversible steps toward its denuclearization.

: An ROK official at the Ministry of National Defense says the ROK has no plan to participate in the U.S.-led global ballistic missile defense (BMD) network.

: Military sources in Korea say the U.S. has started deploying its latest Apache attack helicopters in the ROK to strengthen its deterrent capabilities.

: In a memorandum, President Obama says the U.S. will withhold funding for the DPRK and several other countries for their poor human rights record involving human
trafficking in accordance with section 110 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000.

: DPRK says that it has entered a final phase of uranium enrichment, and is building more nuclear weapons with spent fuel rods extracted from its only operating plutonium-producing reactor.

: U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Stephen Bosworth visits China, South Korea, and Japan for consultations on resuming Six-Party Talks.

: DPRK leader Kim Jong-il says in a commentary carried on Pyongyang Radio, “We can ease tensions and remove the danger of war on the peninsula when the U.S. abandons its hostile policy and signs a peace treaty with us.”

: Ambassador Philip Goldberg, U.S. envoy for implementing UNSC Resolution 1874, visits Seoul and says complete, verifiable denuclearization of the DPRK is “certainly our goal” and that the U.N. sanctions resolution “very much lays that out.”

: The U.S. and South Korea conduct Ulchi Freedom Guardian, an annual joint military exercise involving about 56,000 ROK troops and 10,000 U.S. troops.

: National Security Adviser James Jones says that the U.S. will deal with the DPRK through Six-Party Talks despite Pyongyang’s hope to improve ties with Washington through bilateral negotiations.

: President Obama reiterates that Bill Clinton’s trip to free the two female reporters was a private initiative and not a sign of easing international diplomatic pressure on the DPRK.

: Ex-U.S. President Bill Clinton visits Pyongyang. After talks and dinner with Kim Jong-il, he departs with two U.S. journalists, who had been arrested and sentenced for illicitly entering North Korea from China.

: The North Korea Sanctions Act of 2009 is submitted to the Congress. It calls on the Obama administration to “impose certain sanctions on North Korea as a result of the detonation by that country of a nuclear explosive device on May 25, 2009” under the Arms Export Control Act.

: A survey by Pew Research Center indicates that 78 percent of Koreans now regard the U.S. favorably. This compares sharply to 58 percent in 2007.

: DPRK media criticize annual joint U.S.-ROK Ulchi Freedom Guardian military exercises as “a military plan aimed at invading the North.”

: DPRK Ambassador to the UN Sin Son-ho says that Pyongyang is “not against dialogue” with Washington. He also says “the Six-Party Talks are gone forever.”

: Ri Hung-sik, director general of the DPRK Foreign Ministry’s International Organization Bureau, dismisses a U.S.-proposed “comprehensive package” of political and economic incentives for Pyongyang as “nonsense.”

: Secretary Clinton urges ASEAN Regional Forum members to keep pressure and enforce UN sanctions on the DPRK to end its nuclear program.

: A DPRK Foreign Ministry official calls Secretary Clinton “by no means intelligent” and a “funny lady.” He says, “Sometimes she looks like a primary schoolgirl and sometimes a pensioner going shopping.”

: Sen. John Kerry sponsors an amendment to the 2010 defense-authorization bill expressing a sense of the Senate that the Obama administration should conduct a review to determine whether the DPRK should be re-listed as a state sponsor of terrorism.

: Secretary Clinton says the DPRK must obey a UN resolution on its international shipments or its vessels will “find no port” for commerce.

: Secretary Clinton says “there is obviously a list of incentives and offers that could be made if the DPRK representatives evidence any willingness to take a different path than the one they are currently pursuing.”

: Assistant Secretary Campbell outlines a two-track strategy involving tougher sanctions but also negotiations if the DPRK is willing to give up its nuclear ambitions.

: Secretary Clinton likens Pyongyang’s behavior to that of unruly children.

: Assistant Secretary Campbell says, “If North Korea is prepared to take serious and irreversible steps, the U.S., South Korea, Japan, China, and others will be able to put together a comprehensive package that would be attractive to North Korea.”

: U.N. Security Council panel imposes new sanctions on North Korea, naming five people and five companies subject to travel bans and a freeze on financial assets. U.S. officials express satisfaction with the list and China agrees to most recommendations.

: Ah Ho-young, ROK deputy trade minister, reaffirms that ROK has no plan to renegotiate its free trade agreement (FTA) signed with the U.S.

: U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and the Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell says North Korea is strengthening ties with Burma and that Washington will watch all external support for Burma’s nuclear development, including those by Russia and the DPRK.

: Commander of U.S. forces in Korea Gen. Walter Sharp says the U.S. has no immediate plans to allow South Korea to develop longer-range missiles to counter North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile capabilities.

: The DPRK, at a meeting of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), harshly criticizes the U.S. nuclear threat on the Korean Peninsula, and defends its recent nuclear test.

: U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Kathleen Stephens says the nuclear agreement between the U.S. and South Korea should be changed based on the understanding that peaceful nuclear development is important to South Korea.

: Voice of America reports that nine more DPRK refugees arrived in the U.S. in June, bringing the total to 91 since passage of the North Korean Human Rights Act in 2004.

: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says she hopes the DPRK will free two jailed U.S. reporters. She said the two reporters had expressed “great remorse for the incident,” adding that “everyone is very sorry that it happened.”

: U.S. senators introduce a bill to impose new economic sanctions on the DPRK, re-designate the DPRK as a state sponsor of terrorism, and expand U.S. military cooperation with ROK and Japan.

: Grand National Party (GNP) lawmaker Choi Ku-sik who is spearheading the campaign for the ROK to obtain “programmatic consent” for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, emphasizes that his motive has nothing to do with proliferation.

: President Obama says he doesn’t think a war “is imminent” with the DPRK. He also says, “I think they understand that they would be overwhelmed in a serious military conflict with the United States.”

: ROK Defense Ministry official says the U.S. is open to talks on the possibility of South Korea developing ballistic missiles capable of striking all of North Korea.

: U.S. State Department spokesman Ian Kelly states that the U.S. will not resume food aid to the DPRK unless there is a guarantee that the food will be distributed properly among North Koreans who need it.

: Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan says his ministry will be in charge of persuading the U.S. to allow the ROK to pursue a broader commercial nuclear program including the “recycling” of spent fuel.

: North Korean ship, Kang Nam I, which the U.S. Navy had been tracking because it was suspected of carrying illicit cargo, returns to Nampo without delivering any cargo.

: The DPRK test-fires seven missiles. Vice President Joseph Biden dismisses the latest series of missile launches as, “Some of it seems like almost attention-seeking behavior.”

: President Barack Obama says the U.S. is trying to “keep a door open” for North Korea to return to international nuclear disarmament talks, even as Washington pursues sanctions against the DPRK.

: A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll released says that Americans now consider the DPRK its biggest threat, above Iran, China, and Russia.

: North Korea test-fires four short-range KN-01 surface-to-ship missiles, with a range of 120-160 km, from a base at Sinsang-ri north of Wonsan.

: The Obama administration names Philip Goldberg to lead a task force coordinating Washington’s political, military, and financial measures against the DPRK.

: President Obama extends sanctions on commerce with the DPRK for a year under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act and the Trading with the Enemy Act.

: UN Development Program says that aid projects will continue as planned in North Korea regardless of the sanctions resolution. U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) also says plans to continue its medical aid projects for the DPRK.

: U.S. officials say the U.S. military is tracking a DPRK ship believed to be carrying illicit weapons in the Pacific Ocean.

: Secretary Gates orders the U.S. military to take defensive measures should the DPRK attempt to fire a ballistic missile toward Hawaii.

: DPRK newspaper Rodong Sinmun denounces the ROK for “begging” the U.S. for nuclear protection.

: President Lee and President Obama hold a summit in Washington. They adopt a statement for a “joint vision for the Korea-U.S. alliance.”

: Meeting with President Lee, Secretary Gates says the U.S. will use all means necessary, including nuclear arms, to defend the ROK against military threats from the DPRK.

:  UNSC unanimously passes Resolution 1874, which calls on UN members to inspect cargo vessels suspected of carrying military materials in or out of North Korea.

: DPRK Foreign Ministry denounces UNSC Resolution 1874 and says that North Korea would “weaponize” its existing plutonium stockpiles, begin a program to enrich uranium and take “firm military action if the United States and its allies try to isolate us.”

: Special Envoy Stephen Bosworth says the U.S. will do what is necessary for the security of its allies, but has no plans to invade the DPRK or overthrow its government by force.

: North Korea’s official news agency announces two U.S. journalists who committed a “grave crime” would be sentenced to 12 years of “reform through labor.”

: Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs Philip Crowley says the U.S. has no intention of relisting the DPRK as a state sponsor of terrorism despite nuclear and missile tests that escalated regional tensions.

: Former Defense Secretary William Perry says that if non-military options do not stem the DPRK’s escalation of tension, the U.S. must consider others, namely military options.

: U.S. delegation led by Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg visits Tokyo, Seoul, and Beijing for talks on how to respond to North Korea’s latest nuclear test.

: Secretary of Defense Gates says the U.S. would hold the DPRK accountable for selling or transferring nuclear material outside its borders.

: Yonhap reports the DPRK has restarted its nuclear reprocessing facility.

: North Korean newspaper Choson Sinbo reports that the DPRK will continue to raise the stakes no matter how seriously it is punished by the international community unless the U.S. takes direct action to resolve the nuclear crisis.

: North Korea announces that it no longer considers the Korean Armistice Agreement valid.

: President Obama criticizes the DPRK for its nuclear test, saying the world must “stand up to” Pyongyang and demand that it honor a promise to abandon its nuclear ambitions.

: South Korean government announces that it will fully participate in the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI).

: President Obama tells President Lee in a telephone conversation that “U.S. military strength and nuclear umbrella were expansive enough to protect South Korea.”

: DPRK conducts its second underground nuclear weapons test.

: DPRK fires two short-range missiles from its east coast.

: DPRK’s Korean Central News Agency states that Chairman Kim Jong-il has expressed condolences to the family of former President Roh Moo-hyun.

: Former ROK President Roh Moo-hyun commits suicide.

: President Obama says the KORUS FTA would enhance and promote bilateral ties and prosperity between the two allies.

: U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates says the 30 ground-based missile interceptor system of the U.S. “is only capable against North Korea, and that 30 interceptors in fact provide a strong defense against Pyongyang.”

: DPRK government newspaper Minju Joson says the DPRK will not come back to the negotiation table unless the U.S. and the ROK give up their “hostile policy.”

: Russian Ambassador-at-large Grigory Logvinov, Moscow’s representative to the Six-Party Talks, and U.S. Special Envoy Sung Kim meet in Moscow and agree to search for diplomatic solutions for settling the dispute surrounding the DPRK’s nuclear program.

: U.S. Special Representative for DPRK Policy Stephen Bosworth says he would consider visiting Pyongyang to revive stalled talks on dismantling the DPRK’s nuclear program.

: North Korea rejects bilateral talks with the U.S. and vows to strengthen its nuclear deterrent because the Obama administration is taking a hostile stance towards the country.

: The DPRK criticizes the U.S. for seeking to increase its military spending, vowing to bolster its own defense capabilities to cope with what it calls “increasing American threats.”

: An unidentified DPRK spokesman says President Obama is no different from his predecessor in trying to “stifle” countries that are uncooperative with the U.S.

: Secretary Clinton says the U.S. will not provide economic aid to the DPRK until it stops threatening to conduct further nuclear and missile tests and returns to the Six-Party Talks.

: Secretary Clinton says it is “implausible, if not impossible” that the DPRK will return to international talks on ending its nuclear ambitions.

: The DPRK says it will conduct a second nuclear test and test-launch ballistic missiles unless the UN apologizes for condemning its recent rocket launch.

: The ROK and the U.S. fail to agree on the completion date and cost-sharing for the relocation of U.S. troops on the peninsula.

: Gen. Walter Sharp, the commander of the U.S. forces in Korea stresses that Washington will continue to offer the ROK protection under its nuclear umbrella after the 2012 transfer of wartime operational control.

: The ROK Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee approves the KORUS FTA, paving the way for the entire Assembly to vote on the pact.

: The DPRK orders International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors and a separate U.S. nuclear monitoring team out of the country.

: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton criticizes the DPRK for its decision to restart its nuclear reactor and to boycott the Six-Party Talks.

: The U.S. and Japan propose lists of DPRK companies, banks, and missile-related equipment to be targeted by the UN sanctions that are to be enforced for the first time since they were imposed in 2006.

: The DPRK Foreign Ministry issues a statement saying the DPRK “resolutely rejects” the “unjust” action taken by the UN and that the DPRK “will bolster its nuclear deterrent for self-defense in every way.”

: The UNSC unanimously adopts a nonbinding President’s Statement on the DPRK rocket launch, condemning the action as a violation of a resolution banning the country from all missile activity and demanding no further launches.

: Yonhap reports that the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) wants a free trade pact with the ROK to be ratified without renegotiation.

: DPRK warns that it would take “strong steps” if the UNSC took any action in response to the launch, threatening to boycott the Six-Party Talks and restart its nuclear facilities.

: North Korean Supreme People’s Assembly (SPA) meets and reelects Kim Jong-il to a five-year term as the Chairman of the National Defense Commission (NDC). The SPA also promotes Kim’s brother-in-law, Jang Song-taek, to serve on the NDC.

: Chosun Ilbo reports that the DPRK notified the U.S., China, and Russia in advance of its plan to launch the long-range rocket. According to a ROK National Intelligence Service official, “it is unprecedented for the North to notify the U.S. in advance of the time.”

: North Korea launches a rocket, which ends up in the waters about 1,984 miles from the launch site, about double the range compared to the 1998 launch. U.S. analysts say the failure to launch a satellite might reveal a significant quality control problem in the DPRK.

: President Obama tells Chinese President Hu Jintao that the U.S. would consider a DPRK missile launch provocative and that the U.S. would seek punishment at the UN in response. Obama and President Lee agree on the need for “a unified response by the international community in the event that North Korea launches a long-range missile.”

: Reuters reports that President Barack Obama told President Lee Myung-bak that he wants to make progress on a free trade deal between the two countries.

: The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK)’s state radio accuses U.S. RC-135 surveillance aircraft of spying on the launch site on its northeast coast and threatens to shoot it down. The DPRK also vows to wage war against Japan if it tries to shoot down a missile that the DPRK says will carry a communications satellite.

: Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates says that the U.S. has no plans for military action to pre-empt the launching of a long-range missile by North Korea and would act only if the missile or its parts appeared to be headed toward U.S. territory.  President Lee says he also opposes any military response to North Korea’s impending rocket launch.

: Two U.S. Aegis radar-equipped destroyers dock in Busan.  Rear Adm. Chae Hong-pil of the South Korean Navy says that the U.S. vessels would move into the sea between Japan and Korea to monitor the North Korean missile launch.

: North Korea places a long-range missile on a launch pad as it prepares for what it claims is a satellite launch in early April.

: Hillary Clinton warns that a missile launch would deal a blow to the Six-Party Talks and would bring “consequences.”

: A North Korean Foreign Ministry official warns that if the U.S. pushes for U.N. sanctions in response to its planned rocket launch, it would quit the already stalled Six-Party Talks and restart a nuclear plant making weapons-grade plutonium.

: Gen. Sharp, commander of USFK, tells the Senate Armed Services Committee that “It is both prudent and the ROK’s sovereign obligation to assume primary responsibility for the lead role in its own defense.”

: Yonhap reports that the U.S. and South Korea have reached an agreement on improving ways to share the burden for cleaning up U.S. military bases in Seoul that were returned to South Korean authorities.

: Two U.S. journalists who work for former Vice President Al Gore’s online news outlet are detained by North Korean guards near the border between China and North Korea. Gore asks Secretary Clinton for help, and according to a senior administration official, “She is very engaged and is following it closely.”

: North Korea refuses to accept further humanitarian food aid from the U.S.

: Shin Je-yoon, deputy finance minister, says South Korea is pushing to expand the size and maturity of its $30 billion currency swap deal with the U.S. as part of efforts to better prepare for a liquidity crunch.

: USTR nominee Kirk says he is “generally supportive of the Korea FTA” and pledges to work closely with South Korea to address U.S. concerns over restricted shipments of U.S. beef and an imbalance in auto trade before bringing the FTA to Congress for ratification.

: Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan says the pending FTA with the U.S. would ultimately serve both countries’ interests and expresses hope for swift approval of the deal.

: Secretary Clinton urges North Korea not to launch a ballistic missile, proposing to hold talks on North Korea’s missile program as well as Six-Party Talks on ending the North’s nuclear ambitions.

: A U.S. district court rules that South Korean computer memory-chip maker Hynix must pay a U.S. designer company Rambus $397 million for patent infringement.

: Ron Kirk, President Obama’s nominee for U.S. trade representative (USTR), says at a Senate confirmation hearing that the FTA deal with South Korea “isn’t acceptable” and “not fair,” implying a renegotiation of the deal.

: North Korea cuts military communications lines with South Korea in protest of the annual South Korea-U.S. joint military drills.

: The annual U.S.-South Korea joint military exercise Key Resolve/Foal Eagle is held. According to the USFK, this year’s drill involves 26,000 troops and a nuclear-powered carrier to test the ability to quickly deploy forces in case of a North Korean invasion.

: Stephen Bosworth, U.S. special envoy for North Korea, meets key South Korean policymakers including Minister of Foreign Affairs Yu Myung-ywan and Defense Minister Lee Sang-hee in an effort to restart talks over North Korea’s nuclear program.

: In response to North Korea’s warning, State Department Deputy Spokesman Gordon Duguid says, “The North Koreans should be working on their commitments to the Six-Party Talks rather than making statements that are threatening to peaceful aviation.”

: KCNA, the official North Korean news agency, warns that “security cannot be guaranteed for South Korean civil airplanes flying through the territorial air of our side and its vicinity” while joint military exercises between the U.S. and South Korea are under way.

: The Korean Airport Corporation (KAC) and the Eighth U.S. Army sign a memorandum of understanding that calls for annual antiterrorism drills to better handle explosive materials and to promote bilateral information and technology exchanges

:   President Lee says, “It appears from Chairman Kim’s recent activities that there are no serious obstacles for him to continue ruling North Korea, and I think it is better to have a stabilized North Korean regime at this point in time for inter-Korean dialogue and cooperation.”

: In response to the upcoming annual U.S.-South Korea military drill, North Korean government newspaper Minju Joson says, “Our revolutionary armed forces are fully prepared with combat mobilization posture to sternly strike any provocative maneuvers by the enemies to harm the dignity and safety of our republic.”

: Jeon Jei-guk, South Korea’s deputy defense minister for policy, meets with U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense for East Asia David Sedney in Seoul for the Security Policy Initiative (SPI) meeting.

: A rare meeting between the Korea People’s Army and the United Nations Command is held in Panmunjom.

: The office of the U.S. Trade Representative says the Obama administration will move quickly to address issues related to Congressional approval of free trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia, and Panama.

: Gen. Howie Chandler, commander of U.S. Pacific Air Forces, says that radar-evading bombers and fighter jets have been deployed together for the first time in Guam.

: During a news conference, Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill says that the U.S. will not develop ties with North Korea at the cost of relations with South Korea.

: Gen. Sharp, USFK commander, urges South Korea to participate in a U.S. regional missile defense network to thwart the threat posed by North Korea’s missile programs.

: Pentagon Press Secretary Geoff Morrell says at a daily news conference, “We feel we are well prepared to defend the South against any provocation.”

: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visits Seoul as part of her first Asian tour, meeting with Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan to discuss North Korea’s nuclear threat and other regional security issues.

: Former Prime Minister Han Duck-soo is appointed ROK ambassador to the U.S.

: National Security Advisor Kim Sung-hwan visits Washington for talks with counterparts from the White House, State Department, and Defense Department.

: The Korean Agency for Technology and Standards (KATS) urges South Korean exporters to strictly follow revised safety rules for children’s products bound for the U.S.

: Yonhap reports that U.S. Forces Korea (USFK) Commander Gen. Walter Sharp proposed in a closed meeting that the Eighth U.S. Army command remain in South Korea rather than move to Hawaii as part of a U.S. global realignment plan, even after Washington hands back full control of South Korean troops to Seoul in 2012.

: President Barack Obama and President Lee Myung-bak have a telephone conversation and exchange ideas on pending issues, including North Korea’s nuclear problems and global recession. Obama emphasizes that solving North Korea’s nuclear problem through the Six-Party Talks is important.

: The U.S. government imposes two-year sanctions on three North Korean firms for their involvement in the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

: The Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea, the North’s agency in charge of relations with the South, declares all political and military agreements with South Korea void, including the 1991 Agreement on Reconciliation, Nonaggression and Exchange.

: Yonhap reports that a South Korean Navy destroyer has sailed into waters near the disputed western sea border with North Korea – the scene of naval skirmishes in 1999 and 2002 – to bolster defenses there.

: Foreign Ministry of North Korea announces the country would maintain its “status as a nuclear weapons state” as long as it perceived a nuclear threat from the U.S.

: North Korean military declares an “all-out confrontational posture” against the South and threatens a naval clash.

: North Korean Foreign Ministry calls for “free field access” to ensure there are no nuclear weapons in South Korea. The statement also says that the North will not to give up its nuclear weapons until the U.S. drops its “hostile policy” and establishes diplomatic relations.

: New York Times reports that a group of former Korean prostitutes have accused past South Korean governments and the U.S. military of taking a direct hand in the sex trade from the 1960s through the 1980s.

: U.S. National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley says intelligence officials are growing more concerned that North Korea may be continuing uranium-based activities.

: Opposition members of Parliament end their violent 12-day siege of South Korea’s Parliament after successfully delaying a key vote on the KORUS FTA.  The ruling Grand National Party (GNP) agrees to postpone the vote until after Obama’s inauguration on Jan. 20.

: A team of senior South Korean officials and academics led by Deputy National Security Adivsor Kim Tae-hyo arrives in Washington to meet some of Obama’s diplomatic aides and Korea experts at Washington-based think tanks.

: The U.S. agrees to a South Korea-proposed timetable for relocating its military command out of Seoul by 2014, but the sides remain split on when to complete the relocation of a frontline U.S. Army base.

: State-run North Korean newspapers refrain from issuing their usual blistering New Year’s Day diatribe against the U.S. and reaffirm North Korea’s commitment to a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula.

: The last 520 South Korean soldiers depart Iraq, ending South Korea’s four-year mission to the country.

: Adm. Timothy Keating of U.S. Pacific Command states that North Korea possesses intercontinental ballistic missiles capable of reaching the U.S., including Hawaii and territories of the U.S. in the Pacific.

: Secretary of State Rice states that the Bush administration is committed to continuing to work toward written commitments on inspections of the DPRK’s disarmament program until President Bush’s last day in office.

: The DPRK threatens to slow disablement of its Yongbyon nuclear facility after the U.S. announces it will suspend fuel aid due to the DPRK’s refusal to accept a nuclear disarmament verification plan.

: U.S. Department of Defense spokesman Stewart Upton states that a DOD report that characterizes North Korea as one of five Asian nuclear powers “does not reflect official U.S. government policy regarding the status of North Korea.”

: Six-Party Talks are held in Beijing, focusing on drafting an agreement on verification protocol. China circulates a draft protocol for verifying Yongbyon’s nuclear information. However, talks conclude with no written agreement regarding the denuclearization verification protocol.

: Secretary Hill meets with his DPRK counterpart Kim Kye-gwan in Singapore to discuss the protocol of verification, fuel delivery, and schedule of disablements prior to the start of the Six-Party Talks.

: Secretary of State Rice states that the purpose of the Six-Party Talks scheduled for Dec. 8 is to codify the “number of assurances and a number of understandings” regarding the disarmament verification protocol.

: Special Envoy Sung Kim states that “There is no confusion between Washington and Pyongyang on what was agreed” regarding disarmament verification.

: The U.S. and ROK reach an agreement on how cost sharing for operating U.S. military bases in South Korea over the next five years, with the ROK expected to increase its financial contribution by the same proportion as the local inflation rate for each year until 2013.

: The Kyunghyang Shinmun reports that a verbal deal reached between the DPRK and the U.S. last month would allow inspectors to take samples from the Yongbyon nuclear complex, but only after it enters the next phase of the denuclearization process.

: The Donga Ilbo reports that the U.S. plans to complete the relocation of U.S. troops from Yongsan Garrison and Gyeonggi Province to Pyeontaek by 2016, citing the impossibility of advancing the schedule due to budget and technical problems.

:  President Lee meets former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and former Representative Jim Leach, two top aides to President-elect Obama, “to exchange views on various issues of mutual interest, including ways to overcome the global economic crisis.”

: North Korean Foreign Ministry states that it will not allow outside inspectors to take soil and nuclear waste samples from the Yongbyon nuclear facility.

: U.S. and ROK celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Combined Forces Command.  CFC Commander Gen. Walter Sharp states that despite the pending deactivation of the command in 2012, the defense capabilities of the U.S.-ROK alliance would continue to improve.

: U.S. ships 50,000 metric tons of heavy fuel oil to North Korea as part of the nuclear disarmament deal.

: President Lee states that he would not oppose a summit between President Obama and North Korean leader Kim Jong-il if it helps bring an end to North Korea’s nuclear program, supporting a statement made by Obama during his campaign that he would be willing to hold direct talks with the DPRK.

: State Department spokesman Robert Wood expresses U.S. thanks to South Korea for the Zaytun Division’s contribution to Iraqi stabilization.

: During a telephone conversation, President Lee and President-elect Obama agree to further reinforce the bilateral alliance and to closely cooperate in addressing the global financial crisis and the North Korean nuclear issue.

: AP reports that a North Korean diplomat states that North Korea is ready to deal with any new U.S. administration following Obama’s election victory, and that the DPRK will be open to dialogue if the U.S. seeks it.

: Sung Kim, U.S. State Department’s special envoy for North Korea, and Ri Gun, North Korean Foreign Ministry’s director for North American affairs, meet in New York to discuss the next steps in implementing Pyongyang’s pledge to dismantle its nuclear program.

: Lee Hye-min, South Korea’s chief free-trade regulator, warns President-elect Obama that renegotiating the U.S.-ROK FTA would contradict international custom and potentially damage “the balance that was achieved when the deal was reached.”

: Rodong Simmun reports that the DPRK will further strengthen its defense capabilities against a nuclear threat from the U.S. in response to the U.S. Air Force’s Oct. 24 announcement that it would create a nuclear command.

: Negotiations between the U.S. and South Korea regarding how to share the cost of maintaining 28,000 U.S. troops on the Korean Peninsula conclude without substantial results.

: Secretary Hill states that on-site inspections of North Korean nuclear facilities should start as early as the end of the year after Six-Party Talks delegates approve a recent U.S.-DPRK agreement on how to check information Pyongyang provides about its nuclear activities.

: The ROK Defense Ministry announces that South Korea and the U.S. will, for the first time, conduct a joint search of the demilitarized zone (DMZ) for soldiers buried during the Korean War.

: President George W. Bush announces South Korea’s entry into the Visa Waiver Program, which allows Korean citizens to stay in the U.S. for up to 90 days without visas.

: Following the annual U.S. – ROK Security Consultative Meeting (SCM) held in Washington, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates affirms that the U.S. remains committed to defending South Korea, that its armed forces would respond “quickly with appropriate military power in case of a military emergency, and that South Korea will continue to receive the protection of the “U.S. nuclear umbrella”.

: A ship carrying a delivery of food aid comprised of 20,000 tons of corn and 5,000 tons of beans departs from the U.S. and is scheduled to arrive in North Korea on Nov. 18.

: The ROK Justice Ministry announces that U.S. Forces, Korea (USFK) has refused to share the expenses the Korean government was forced to pay for lawsuits involving U.S. military activities.  USFK’s says the Status of Forces Agreement allows it to differ from the Korean court’s decision if it was out of sync with its own judgment.

: IAEA inspectors reseal equipment and reactivate cameras at the Yongbyon nuclear complex.

: U.S. Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs William Burns, South Korean Deputy Foreign Minister Lee Yong-joon, and Japanese Deputy Foreign Minister for Political Affairs Kenichiro Sasae meet in Washington to discuss trilateral security cooperation issues, including Iraq, Afghanistan, the Northeast Asian political situation, regional cooperation, and major international security issues.

: North Korea lifts its ban on International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspections and announces that it will continue to disable Yongbyon nuclear facilities.

: U.S. removes North Korea from its list of state sponsors of terrorism.  State Department spokesman McCormack states that “Every single element of verification that we sought going in is part of this package.”

: North Korea bars international nuclear inspectors from all parts of its Yongbyon nuclear complex and threatens to restart its reactor.

: U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice insists that North Korea must meet proper standards for verifying its nuclear disarmament, while declining to comment on the outcome of talks that Secretary Christopher Hill held with North Korean officials.

: Yonhap reports that North Korea fired two short-range missiles into international waters in the Yellow Sea as part of a routine military drill. State Department spokesman McCormack states that the U.S. advises against the firing of short-range missiles because “It’s not helpful in any way managing tensions within the region.”

: U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill meets Chinese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Wu Dawei in Beijing to discuss the outcome of his negotiations with North Korean officials.

: U.S. State Department spokesman Sean McCormack reiterates that a verification protocol is an “irreducible component of the six-party process moving forward.”

: ROK Defense Ministry states that the U.S. has asked for a delay in the schedule to relocate U.S. military bases in South Korea by up to four years due to budgetary constraints.

: Assistant Secretary of State Hill meets South Korean counterpart Kim Sook to discuss Hill’s visit to Pyongyang. Later, he meets his Japanese counterpart Saiki Akitaka for similar discussions.

: Christopher Hill, chief U.S. negotiator for the Six-Party Talks, visits Pyongyang for talks on nuclear disarmament.

: Assistant Secretary Hill departs for Seoul with the intent to travel to Pyongyang for meetings aimed at breaking the impasses on the verification protocol.

: In an interview with Reuters, Secretary Rice states that the U.S. is not considering halting fuel aid to North Korea despite growing tension over North Korea’s moves to rebuild its nuclear program.

: U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Kathleen Stephens arrives in Seoul, stressing that the U.S. and South Korea should work together to resolve issues such as the FTA, a visa waiver program, and the denuclearization of North Korea.

: Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan announces in Washington a final agreement on a deal with Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff to allow South Korea to join the U.S. Visa Waiver Program.

: The IAEA announces that its inspectors have been barred from the reprocessing plant in Yongbyon and that North Korea announced that it intends to resume production of nuclear weapons-grade fuel within a week.

: The IAEA states that North Korea has asked the agency to remove its seals from the Pyongyang nuclear reactor.

: Defense Secretary Robert Gates states that the U.S. is monitoring North Korea closely for potential instability in the wake of Kim Jong-il’s stroke last month.

: The DPRK Foreign Ministry releases a statement that North Korea no longer wishes to be removed from the U.S. State Sponsors of Terrorism List and confirms that it has begun reassembling the Yongbyon facility that can produce weapons-grade plutonium.

: Chosun Ilbo reports that North Korea has completed tests on an engine mechanism for an intercontinental missile capable of hitting major cities on the U.S. west coast at a previously unidentified missile launch site on the west coast of North Korea.

: In North Korea’s first reaction to reports that Kim Jong-il is in poor health, Ambassador Song Il-ho denies the claim and states that, “We see such reports as not only worthless, but rather as a conspiracy plot.”

: President of the Presidium of the Supreme People’s Assembly Kim Yong Nam states that the halt in disablement and the moves to reassemble the Yongbyon nuclear facility are aimed at pressing the U.S. to take North Korea off its State Sponsors of Terrorism List.

: North Korean leader Kim Jong-il’s failure to appear at a military parade celebrating the 60th anniversary of the founding of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea prompts speculation regarding his health and rumors that he has suffered a stroke.

: The Ministry for Food, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries announces that it will send seven inspectors from the National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service to 22 U.S. meat processing and packing facilities to review conformance with established export rules.

: Assistant Secretary Hill completes two days of meetings in Beijing with his Chinese, Russian, Japanese, and South Korean counterparts, stating that the U.S. would take North Korea off the State Sponsors of Terrorism List “immediately” if it would agree to a verification regime for denuclearization.

: Reacting to activity at the Yongbyon nuclear facility, State Department spokesman McCormack denies that North Korea is rebuilding the facility, stating that North Korea is only “moving some equipment around that they had previously put into storage” and that no effort has been made to “reconstruct, reintegrate this equipment.”

: U.S. Ambassador Alexander Vershbow, who will leave his post in South Korea at the end of September, states that while the U.S.-ROK alliance has important security functions, its role should be expanded to include global issues such as climate change, food security, and multilateral trade.

: The IAEA reports that it was informed on Aug. 18 that North Korea had suspended disablement of the Yongbyon nuclear facility.

: South Korea’s First Vice Foreign Minister Kwon Jong-rak leaves for Washington to meet the U.S. presidential candidates, Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte, and Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill to discuss regional issues and the Six-Party Talks.

: U.S. Forces Korea announces that when South Korea takes wartime control of all troops in the country in 2012, operations will continue under three military commands.  The U.S. will lead one command, while South Korea will lead two commands.

: Negotiations in Seoul between the U.S. and South Korea on increasing South Korea’s financial share in maintaining U.S. troops on the peninsula conclude without agreement.

: State Department’s Special Envoy for North Korea Sung Kim arrives in Beijing for the second time in two weeks to consult with Chinese officials in an effort to resolve the stalemate in finalizing details for the North Korean denuclearization verification system.

: Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez notes during a news briefing that the ratification of the KORUS FTA was “just a matter of when, rather than if,” noting his hope for Congress’ action during the lame duck session.

: After the 45-day notification period to Congress (from June 26), the U.S. does not remove North Korea from the State Department’s State Sponsors of Terrorism List because North Korea has failed to agree to verification protocol for denuclearization.

: Kurt Tong, a National Security Council director, replaces Sung Kim as the head of the Korea Desk at the U.S. State Department.

: Presidents George W. Bush and Lee Myung-Bak meet in Seoul and issue a joint statement pressing North Korea to improve its citizens’ human rights, a rare mention of the North Korean human rights issue in a U.S.-South Korean joint statement.

: The South Korean government’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission completes an initial investigation concluding that the U.S. military indiscriminately killed large groups of refugees and civilians early in the Korean War.  The Commission is urging the South Korean government to seek U.S. compensation for victims’ families.

: Kathleen Stephens is confirmed by the Senate to serve as U.S. Ambassador to South Korea. The confirmation by voice vote came after Sen. Sam Brownback, R-Kan., removed a hold on Stephens over objections regarding the Bush Administration’s policy on North Korea.

: A shipment of 2.2 tons of U.S. beef arrives at Incheon International Airport in South Korea, marking the first import of U.S. beef in four years.

: The Donga Ilbo reports that a group from the Institute for Strategic Reconciliation has been sent to teach English to North Korean middle school students, marking the first time North Korea has invited U.S. citizens to teach in the North Korean school system.

: Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice meets with North Korean Foreign Minister Pak Ui Chun in Singapore on the sidelines of the ASEAN Regional Forum conference, marking the first time in four years that the U.S. and North Korea hold a Cabinet-level meeting.

: Senior defense officials from the U.S. and South Korea meet in Washington, D.C. to discuss how to share joint defense costs to maintain the 28,000 U.S. troops on the Korean Peninsula, but are unable to reach an agreement.

: Yonhap News reports that a comprehensive report on environmental damages at U.S. bases in Korea covering the past 10 years shows significant environmental damage, with land contamination from oil being the most serious problem.

: U.S. Forces, Japan Commander Lt. Gen. Edward Rice urges North Korea to disclose more information about its military capabilities and purposes, describing the country as posing “a potential threat” to Northeast Asia.

: Head of Delegations Meeting of Six-Party Talks concludes in Beijing with North Korea apparently agreeing to disable its main reactor by the end of October and to allow international inspectors to verify its nuclear disarmament in exchange for economic aid.  Technical details of the verification process are still to be determined by a working group.

: Head of Delegations Meeting of Six-Party Talks convenes in Beijing, focusing on the establishment of verification protocol for North Korean denuclearization.

: North Korea accuses the U.S. of escalating tension after the U.S. announces a U.S.-South Korean joint military exercise, which North Korea views as a criminal act.  The exercise, Ulchi-Freedom Guardian, will be led by the ROK Army with assistance from the U.S. to prepare for transfer of full control of ROK forces to South Korea in 2012.

: Chosun Ilbo reports that the U.S. Department of Agriculture Quality System Assessment program, which guarantees that beef exported to South Korea comes from cattle aged under 30 months and is the last step prior to beginning beef exports to South Korea, is now under way in the U.S.

: The U.S. State Department spokesman Sean McCormack responds to questions regarding whether North Korea fully disclosed information on its uranium program and nuclear proliferation by stating that Pyongyang’s declaration was “completed” and that North Korea “made statements that can be verified.”

: State Department spokesman McCormack reports that the U.S. has reserved $19.5 million to fund North Korea’s nuclear disarmament through the State Department’s Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund.

: South Korea’s Cabinet approves a bill on the KORUS Free Trade Agreement in an effort to win parliamentary approval for the delayed deal after resuming U.S. beef imports.

: On a tour through Asia, Secretary Rice meets ROK Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan in Seoul.

: North Korea demolishes a cooling tower at its Yongbyon reactor.

:   Secretary Rice authors opinion article in the Wall Street Journal supporting the negotiation process with North Korea and confirming the intent to remove the DPRK from the terrorism list and TWEA with submission of its nuclear declaration to China.

: North Korea submits long-awaited nuclear declaration to China as the Chair of the Six-Party Talks.   In exchange the U.S. agrees to lift key Trading with the Enemy Act sanctions and remove North Korea from its terrorism list.

: President Bush signs a National Emergency Declaration, which reinstates many of the TWEA restrictions due to continuing proliferation threat from North Korea.

: U.S. resumes beef exports to South Korea despite intensified protests.  South Korean quarantine inspections restart as well.

: President Bush telephones Japanese Prime Minister Fukuda ahead of an anticipated nuclear declaration from North Korea to indicate support for Japan’s ongoing claims against North Korea over the abduction issue.

:   Secretary Hill meets Chinese counterpart Wu Dawei to discuss North Korea’s denuclearization declaration.

: After a week of negotiations in Washington, DC, U.S. Trade Representative Susan Schwab and South Korean Trade Minister Kim Jong-hoon reach a revised agreement on U.S. beef exports to Korea.

: Trilateral talks among Six-Party Talks negotiators from U.S. South Korea, and Japan. Japan expresses concern over U.S. plans to remove the DPRK from its state sponsors of terrorism list.

:   Secretary Rice speech at Heritage Foundation expresses support for the six party process and previews the U.S. steps in conjunction with North Korea’s declaration.

: In a televised statement South Korean Justice Minister Kim Kyung-han vows to take action against protestors against U.S. beef in order restore order.

: Gen. Walter Sharp assumes command of United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/U.S. Forces Korea.

: Defense Minister Lee Sang-hee and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates meet in Seoul to discuss mutual military interests.  During the meeting, Gates endorses extended tours for US troops in South Korea. They also agree to maintain current U.S. troop strength at 28,500.

: The Unification Ministry states that if the DPRK completely denuclearizes the ROK has agreed to send 1,000 tons of copper as economic aid.

: Papers report that the DPRK attempted to export a GPS jamming device to Iran and Syria. The device can interfere with the signal needed by GPS guided bombs and missiles.

: Secretary Hill meets Minister Kim Gye-Gwan in Beijing to discuss the aid that the DPRK will receive if it fully denuclearizes and the possibility of removing the DPRK off the US list of state sponsors of terror.

: An unidentified South Korean official confirms to Yonhap News Agency that the ROK plans to buy DPRK fuel rods in an attempt to speed up the denuclearization process.

: South Korea delays U.S. beef importation for up to 10 days due to public unrest. U.S. Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez says the event is “unfortunate.”
May 18-19, 2008: Secretary Hill meets counterparts Kim Sook of South Korea and Akitaka Saiki of Japan in Washington, DC.

: South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency reports that the ROK government will send $9.6 million in humanitarian aid to the DPRK to mitigate the effects of famine.

: U.S. team headed by Sung Kim returns from the DPRK with 18,000 pages of documents on DPRK nuclear activities at Yongbyon.

:  ROK Agriculture Ministry official confirms to Agence France-Presse plans to resume imports of beef from U.S. in late May.

: Presidential Spokesperson Lee Dong-kwan states that the Lee administration is trying to alleviate the public panic surrounding mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

: House Foreign Affairs Committee passes legislation to allow the DPRK denuclearization process to be funded by Department of Energy. The U.S. plans to give $50 million in the fiscal year 2008 and up to $360 million in fiscal year 2009. Committee also approves a bill that requires a “complete and correct declaration” of all nuclear programs before North Korea can be removed from the state sponsors of terror list.

: The ROK Defense Ministry reports that they were not notified when the U.S. relocated a Korea-based AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopter squadron to Afghanistan.

: Agreement is reached between the DPRK and the U.S. that the DPRK will give thousands of pages of documentation on nuclear activity at Yongbyon.

: U.S. intelligence officials show U.S. lawmakers a videotape of a remote nuclear reactor site in Syria that links the activity to North Korea.

: U.S. Department of Defense announces a plan to extend the assignment period from one year to three years for U.S. military stationed in South Korea.

: CIA and White House officials brief key lawmakers on evidence of a DPRK-Syria nuclear technology transfer. The CIA describes the capabilities of a plutonium-based nuclear reactor to create nuclear weapons.

: Team of U.S. officials and nuclear experts led by Sung Kim, director of Korean Affairs at the Department of State meet Kim Gye-Gwan and others in Pyongyang to discuss the details of the North Korean nuclear declaration.

: President Lee holds summit with Prime Minister Fukuda Yasuo in Japan.  The leaders reach an agreement to strengthen U.S., ROK, and Japan relations, which includes a three-way dialogue to discuss the DPRK’s nuclear program.

: President Lee arrives at Camp David for his summit with President Bush.

: Presidential spokesman Lee Dong-kwan confirms that Cheong Wa Dae has decided to send at least ten police officers to train Afghan police cadets.

: A coalition of 500 U.S. businesses and state and local chambers of commerce present a joint statement calling for speedy ratification of the ROK-U.S. FTA to President Lee at the end of a meeting organized by the Chamber of Commerce in Washington DC.

: ROK Foreign Ministry names Kim Sook, former North American Bureau director, to be the top ROK negotiator to the Six-Party Talks replacing Chun Young-woo.

: President Lee Myung-bak’s Grand National Party wins a majority in the parliamentary elections by securing 153 of the 299 seats.  The results are a blow to the United Democratic Party headed by minority leader Park Geun-hye.

: Top negotiators of North Korea, China, U.S., South Korea, and Japan meet separately in Beijing.  Secretary Hill states that he has good discussions with all his counterparts but much work remains.  Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs and lead Chinese negotiator Wu Dawei states that he expects a resolution in the fall.

:  In confirmation hearings, U.S. Ambassador-designate to South Korea Kathleen Stephens expresses hope that the ROK will deploy troops to Afghanistan and that the issue will be discussed at upcoming talks between Presidents Bush and Lee at Camp David.

April 14, 2008: South Korea’s Yonhap News reports that after gaining a majority in the National Assembly, the GNP is pushing to open a parliamentary session next month to resolve several issues including the KORUS FTA. Spokesperson for the GNP Cho Yoon-sun, states, “We must open a May assembly session and vote on the ROK-US free trade agreement and other bills.”

: Assistant Secretary Hill and DPRK Vice Foreign Minister Kim Gye-Gwan meet in Singapore.  Press reports indicate that an agreement is reached in which the DPRK would acknowledge U.S. concerns regarding DPRK proliferation activities and concerns on uranium enrichment. Both negotiators express satisfaction in the main outcome of the meeting.

: The Rodong Shinmun attacks the U.S. for transferring nuclear technology to other countries including the ROK. It said “The United States is not entitled to say anything about the “nuclear issue” of others.”

: The DPRK’s Tongil Shinmun denounces the ROK’s possible membership in the U.S.-led ballistic missile defense system, condemning it as a preemptive strike on the DPRK.

: Lt. General Walter J. Sharp, nominated to be the commander of U.S. and UN forces in Korea, informed the Senate Armed Service Committee that the ROK should upgrade its anti-missile defense system to the PAC-3 Patriot missile defense system.

: Pyongyang announces that it will take unspecified “military countermeasures” if the ROK does not apologize for Gen. Kim Tae-young’s comment regarding a preemptive strike.

: The DPRK’s Worker’s Party Newspaper, Rodong Shinmun, criticizes President Lee Myung-Bak, calling him a “sycophant” a “confrontational maniac” and a “traitor”.

: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Kim Tae-young, states to the National Assembly that the ROK would consider a preemptive military strike on nuclear facilities in North Korea if it believed the DPRK was about to launch a nuclear assault.

: U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Christopher Hill holds bilateral consultations with ROK counterpart Chun Young-woo in Seoul and meets other senior officials, including Unification Minister Kim Ha-joong, Vice Foreign Minister Kwon Jong-rak and Deputy Foreign Minister Lee Yong-joon.

: The ROK government pleads with local assemblymen to pass the Korea-U.S. (KORUS) Free Trade Agreement.

: Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan visits the U.S. and meets Secretary Rice to prepare for the April 15 summit to take place between the presidents.

: U.S. State Department notifies Congress of six arms and defense exports to Korea in 2007, each amounting to $50 million.

: ROK National Security Advisor Byung-kook Kim leaves for Washington to meet National Security Advisor Hadley and Secretary Rice.

: Gen. Bell denies making the statement that ROK will pay $10 billion to relocate U.S. troops.  He claims this was a misunderstanding and that ROK is actually expected to pay W5.59 trillion (approximately $5.75 billion).

: ROK claims that Gen. Bell’s statements to the U.S. House Appropriations Committee claiming that Korea will cover the majority of costs of relocating troops from Seoul are unrealistic and wishful thinking.  The Korean Defense ministry states that the maximum amount paid by ROK will be $4.38 billion.

: President Lee urges farmers to end their opposition to the ROK-U.S. trade agreement in favor of constructive dialogue.  He states that although the government has budgeted $100 billion for rural communities, free trade should be discussed on the part of the farmers.

: Gen. Bell tells the House Appropriations Committee that the ROK has agreed to cover majority of the costs of moving U.S. forces out of Seoul, an approximate cost of $10 billion, also stating that both countries will equally split the costs of relocating the 2nd Infantry Division.

: Assistant U.S. Secretary of State Christopher Hill and North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan hold talks in Geneva aimed at breaking the deadlock over North Korea’s nuclear program. Hill describes the discussion as a good consultation. State Department’s head of Korean affairs, Sung Kim, remains in Geneva and has an additional meeting with representatives from North Korea on March, 14.

: Defense Minister Lee Sang-hee talks via phone with his U.S. counterpart Robert Gates to discuss the prioritizing of a cost sharing plan for U.S. troops in Korea. Ambassador Vershbow also visited Lee to further discuss the U.S. position on the issue.

:  Announcement is made that Presidents Lee and Bush will meet at Camp David for a private dinner and summit in mid-April.  This will be the first time that leaders from the U.S. and ROK will meet there instead of the White House.

: Ambassador Alexander Vershbow says the U.S. wants the ROK to assume 50 percent of non-personnel costs for U.S. troops in Korea.  He also expresses the idea of a longer term agreement rather than continuing to renegotiate on an annual basis.

: Assistant Secretary of State Hill meets South Korean counterpart Chun Yung-woo to discuss how to resume the Six-Party Talks.

: The DPRK intensifies its criticism of the joint military exercises between ROK and U.S.

: 27,000 US troops, the USS Nimitz aircraft carrier, and a number of ROK soldiers begin the military exercises known as Key Resolve and Foal Eagle to improve both countries’ combat-readiness.

: President Bush meets 20 experts to discuss a strategy to win ratification of the FTA with ROK amid growing concerns that the agreement may not be ratified.

: The New York Philharmonic Orchestra performs a landmark concert in North Korea. The concert was broadcast live on local television and included the national anthems of both countries, music by two U.S. composers, and a Korean folk song. The visit entailed the largest U.S. presence in North Korea since the end of the Korean War.

: Condoleezza Rice attends the inauguration ceremony of President Lee and confirms the strong alliance between the two countries.

: The chief U.S. negotiator for the FTA repeats the message that the ROK has to open its market to beef imports if Korea wants the U.S. to ratify the agreement.

: A U.S. nuclear-powered submarine arrives in Busan to prepare for the Key Resolve/Foal Eagle Exercise 2008 scheduled for early March.

: Japan, Korea, and the U.S. agree to mobilize their militaries together to handle non-security related matters such as disaster situations.

: President-elect Lee urges President Roh to work closely with the National Assembly to ratify the U.S.-ROK FTA before his term expires.  Lee Hye-min, ROK deputy negotiator for the FTA, states in a radio address that both countries agreed that there will be no additional negotiation of the agreement.

: President-elect Lee names former Ambassador to Japan Yu Myung-hwan as foreign minister and former Defense chief Gen. Lee Sang-hee as defense minister.

: ROK and U.S. sign an agreement to boost cooperation between the countries’ militaries in the information technology sector.  This is done in preparation for the transfer of wartime OPCON of ROK forces so that both militaries will be able to effectively support joint missions.

: U.S. Representative Royce submits a bill to the House to upgrade ROK to the level of NATO +3 member status in the U.S. foreign military sales program.  This will allow ROK to purchase a wider variety of military supplies at a lower price.

: In Hawaii, officials from ROK and the U.S. discuss the handling of U.S. ammunition reserves stored in ROK.  These talks are part of a plan to end the program of stockpiling munitions in Korea.

: Members of the Democratic Labor Party blockade the location where the Parliament was to discuss the U.S.-ROK FTA, forcing the meeting to be postponed.

: President of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions Lee Suk-haeng begins a four-day trip to the U.S. to discuss joint action with U.S. labor groups to block the ratification of the ROK-U.S. FTA.

: President-elect Lee, in a meeting with 10 members of the New Beginnings Group formed by Stanford University and the Korea Society, including former ambassadors Mike Armacost, Tom Hubbard, and Jack Pritchard, states that the ratification of the FTA would take the U.S.-ROK alliance to a new level of cooperation.

: U.S. Forces, Korea announces plans to reduce its troop level to 25,000 by the end of the year as part of a global plan to reposition U.S. troops.

: Gen. Bell announces plans to extend length of tours for U.S. soldiers from one to three years and increase opportunities for their families to stay in Korea.

: Following a month-long investigation, the Ministry of National Defense states that it aims to complete by 2010 a decontamination process at 18 former U.S. military bases transferred to ROK.

: Korean newspapers report concern that the ROK-US FTA is in danger.

: Commander, U.S. Pacific Command Adm. Timothy Keating states that the transfer of wartime OPCON is very important and the U.S. forces in Korea will remain between 25,000-28,000 troops.

: Gen. Bell states that the U.S. is unwilling to renegotiate the transfer of wartime OPCON of ROK, seeing “no military rationale” to delay the transfer.

: In his State of the Union Address, President Bush urges lawmakers to ratify the FTA with ROK, stating that it will enhance U.S. competitiveness in fast-changing Asian markets and strengthen the alliance between the two countries.

: Kathleen Stephens, advisor at the State Department’s East Asia and Pacific Affairs, is nominated as the next U.S. ambassador to ROK.

: Ministry of National Defense states that ROK and U.S. militaries agree to conduct joint recovery and identification of soldiers’ remains from the Korean War.

: A ROK liaison officer is sent to the US Navy’s 5th fleet in Bahrain to work on better cooperation with the U.S. Navy, and to coordinate protection of ROK citizens, ships, and sailors in the region amidst growing numbers of pirate attacks.

: Chung shows caution over renegotiating the transfer of the wartime military OPCON of ROK troops.  He states that according to some Korea experts he met with in the U.S., the transfer could send the wrong message to the DPRK.  Chung meets with Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, but said he will not bring up the transfer first.

: President Bush “drops by” on Chung’s meeting with National Security Advisor Steve Hadley and indicates that bolstering the U.S.-ROK alliance is one of his top priorities and he is anxious for a visit from Lee.

:  Chung Mong-joon, the special envoy of President-elect Lee, arrives in Washington to discuss positions of the incoming government including improvement of bilateral relations, ratification of the FTA, and the ROK’s entry into the U.S. visa waiver program.  Chung also states that the U.S.-ROK relationship has been damaged in the past due to a lack of sincere dialogue and that the new government hopes to rectify this.

: President-elect Lee states that the Combined Forces Command is an important force in providing Northeast Asian security.  He discusses with Gen. Burwell Bell many issues to further improve the ROK-U.S. military alliance and maintain a defense position against the DPRK.

: Ahn Sang-soo, floor leader of the Grand National Party, says the National Assembly has discussed the possibility of ratifying the FTA with the U.S. by the end of February.  Sohn Hak-kyu, the new chairman of the United Democratic New Party, says he would back the agreement if provisions are made to help rural farmers who could be hurt by the agreement.

: The ROK presidential transition committee begins considering whether ROK should be a part of the U.S.-led Proliferation Security Initiative since full participation may affect inter-Korean relations.

: U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill states that President Bush plans to send Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to attend President-elect Lee’s inauguration ceremony in February.

: Korea Herald reports that a U.S. delegation, intent on transferring wartime OPCON of ROK troops in 2012, will meet with Lee’s transition team on Jan. 14 to discuss the issue.  The delegation will be headed by Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for East Asia David Sedney.

: President-elect Lee, in a meeting with Assistant Secretary Hill, asks the U.S. to engage in dialogue with the North Korean military leadership to assuage fears of regime collapse.

: Transition team spokesman Lee Dong-gwan states that the scheduled transfer of wartime OPCON of ROK military forces needs to be carefully considered in light of the North Korean nuclear issue.

: U.S. Trade Representative Susan Schwab says in a teleconference from Las Vegas that the benefits from the ROK-U.S. FTA should not be sacrificed due to some opposition.  She argues that the agreement benefits all Americans.

: President-elect Lee states in a meeting with U.S. experts led by Stephen Solarz that Seoul and Washington should work together to form a stronger alliance.

: ROK Defense Minister Kim Jang-soo says wartime OPCON of ROK troops must be transferred from the U.S. by the agreed April 17, 2012 date, but left open that this transfer may be rescheduled depending on security circumstances in 2012.

:   North Korea fails to meet the Dec. 31 deadline for a complete and correct declaration of its nuclear programs.

: President-Elect Lee vows to revise “Sunshine Policy” with North Korea.

:   Former Seoul Mayor Lee Myung-bak of the conservative Grand National Party is elected president of South Korea.

: Sung Kim, director of the Korea Desk at the U.S. State Department visits North Korea to discuss the declaration of its nuclear programs. According to sources, North Korean officials repeatedly denied the existence of a uranium enrichment program during the visit.

: South Korean news agency Yonhap reports that North Korea responded verbally to the personal letter from President Bush to Chairman Kim Jong-il saying the North “appreciates President Bush’s letter, will fulfill its obligations and expects the U.S. to perform what it has to do.” It was unclear whether the North Korean message was from Chairman Kim.

: New York Philharmonic Orchestra announces that it will perform in North Korea on Feb. 26, 2008.

: South Korea withdraws its military forces from Afghanistan.

: Christopher Hill delivers a personal letter from President Bush to Kim Jong-il that urges North Korea to fully declare their nuclear programs.

: Christopher Hill, assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, visits China, Japan, South, and North Korea to discuss the North Korea disarmament process.

: House of Representatives proposes citizenship to Korean War children.

:   President Roh proposes immediate four-party talks on peace on the Korean Peninsula.

: South Korea and U.S. conduct ground-breaking ceremony for $12 billion Yongsan base relocation project in Pyeongtaek, Gyeonggi Province.

: North Korea expresses gratitude for U.S. help in ending a high-seas standoff with Somali pirates, describing the maritime collaboration as a “symbol of cooperation” between the two countries “in the struggle against terrorism.”

: President Bush encourages U.S. Congress to pass FTA.

: U.S. team begins disabling North Korea’s nuclear facilities.

: President Roh calls for the National Assembly to ratify the KORUS FTA.

: South Korean Foreign Minister Song Min-Soon visits Canada and U.S.

: Nine-member U.S. team of nuclear experts arrive in North Korea to begin supervising the disablement of the nuclear facilities at Yongbyon, which is expected to begin within a week.

: U.S. Navy assists crew of hijacked North Korea ship of the Somali coast.

: U.S. and South Korea discuss visa waiver program and South Korea’s electronic passport progress.

: U.S. calls for talks among the U.S., South Korea, North Korea, and China regarding ending the Korean War.

: U.S. House of Representatives passes a resolution calling on Chinese government to stop forcible repatriation of North Korea refuges.

: U.S. says it plans to share advanced surveillance aircraft, the Global Hawk, with South Korea by 2011.

:   President Roh says his government will seek a one-year extension for South Korea troops in Iraq.

: Follow-on team comprised of 12 U.S. nuclear experts arrives in Pyongyang to negotiate specific steps in implementing the agreement to disable North Korea’s nuclear facilities by the end of the year.

: U.S. trade officials assert U.S. Congress will not debate KORUS FTA until U.S. beef imports resume to South Korea.

: U.S. and South Korea conduct talks to resume importation of U.S. beef.

:   South Korea begins environmental cleanup for 32 of 59 U.S. military facilities that will be returned to South Korea as part of 2004 land swap to reposition U.S. forces south of Seoul.

: U.S. nuclear disablement team arrives in North Korea to finalize a plan for disablement procedures for North Korean nuclear facilities.

: South Korea resumes annual military training exercise Hwarang, which was delayed during the October South Korea/North Korea summit.

: President Roh and North Korea Leader Kim Jong-il sign a declaration for the advancement of inter-Korean relations, peace and prosperity at the close of the inter-Korean summit in Pyongyang.

:   Beijing announces that a joint agreement reached at the Six-Party Talks on disabling North Korea’s nuclear facilities and declaration of its nuclear programs by Dec. 31 has been approved by all parties.

:   White House denies that President Bush will meet presidential hopeful Lee Myung-bak, saying that it didn’t want to interfere with South Korea’s politics.

:   At North-South Summit, Kim Jong-il and President Roh Moo-hyun discuss inter-Korean peace and investment plans.

: State Department spokesperson announces the U.S. has endorsed the draft joint statement that sets out the second stage of North Korea’s denuclearization process.

: Second Session of the Sixth Round of the Six Party Talks is held in Beijing. Delegates agree to a joint statement that requires North Korea to report and disable three nuclear facilities by Dec. 31, 2007.

: Upon arrival in Beijing for the Six-Party Talks, Kim Kye-Gwan denounces “lunatic reports” of North Korean nuclear assistance to Syria.

: Several news sources report that a Sept. 6 Israeli attack inside Syria was on what Israeli intelligence believes was a nuclear-related facility that North Korea was helping to equip.

: U.S. and South Korea discuss peace treaty for Korean Peninsula.

: President Bush reaffirms willingness to sign peace treaty for Korean Peninsula provided North Korea fully dismantles its nuclear program.

: Nuclear experts from Russia, China, and the U.S. visit North Korea to survey nuclear facilities and recommend ways to disable them.

: Presidents Roh and Bush meet at APEC.

: U.S. denies agreeing to remove North Korea from terrorism list.

: North Korea reports that the U.S. has agreed to remove North Korea from terrorism list.

: Former South Korean President Kim Dae-jung visits the U.S. to discuss Korean issues with U.S. officials.

: Six-Party Talks Working Group on U.S.-North Korea bilateral relations meets in Geneva.

: U.S. confirms that U.S.-South Korea trade agreement will not be re-opened and renegotiated, but outstanding issues on beef will need to be resolved before U.S. Congressional approval.

: South Korea and Taliban insurgents reach agreement on the release of 19 Koreans held hostage in Afghanistan. The agreement calls for the release of all hostages beginning Aug. 29 in return for removal of all South Korean military forces by the end of 2007, ending all missionary work in Afghanistan, and banning all travel by Koreans to the country.

: South Korea government resumes inspections of U.S. beef shipments.

: South Korea’s financial regulator requests approval for new KOSPI 200 futures index from the U.S.

: U.S.-South Korea joint military exercise, Ulchi Focus Lens, begins.

: South Korea gives Tong-il Medal, South Korea’s most valuable military decoration, to U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Peter Pace.

: U.S. signs into law the visa waiver program with South Korea.

: U.S. House of Representatives approves resolution condemning Japan’s sexual enslavement of women during WWII, some of whom were Korean, and urges Japan to apologize.

: South Korea announces it plans to issue e-passports as part of visa waiver program.

: U.S. calls for immediate release of South Korean hostages in Afghanistan, but affirms that it doesn’t negotiate with terrorists.

: First Session of the Sixth Round of Six-Party Talks resumes in Beijing after a four-month recess.

: South Korea and U.S. agree to provide political incentives for North Korea as part of denuclearization of the North.

: North Korea states that it has shut down its Yongbyon nuclear facility after receiving the first shipment of heavy fuel oil on July 13. IAEA verifies the shutdown on July 16.

: North Korean Lt Gen. Ri Chan-bok, who heads the North`s mission at Panmunjom, announces “Pyongyang wants direct military talks with Washington in the presence of a United Nations representative any place and any time.”

: UN inspectors head to Pyongyang to verify shutdown of North Korean’s Yongbyon nuclear facility.

: North Korea proposes bilateral talks with U.S. to replace armistice that ended Korean War in 1953.

: South Korea sends 1st shipment of 6,200 tons of fuel oil (of a total of 50,000 tons), to North Korea.

: South Korea’s Foreign Affairs and Trade Minister Song Min-soon says South Korea should tie denuclearization of North Korea to the end of the Korean War.

: At a forum in Seoul, Gen. Burwell Bell, commander of U.S. Forces Korea, comments that North Korea remains a threat despite its move toward dismantling their nuclear program.

: U.S. President Bush pledges to include South Korea in visa waiver program with U.S.

: U.S. and South Korea rename military drills from RSOI (Reception, Staging, Onward Movement, Integration) to “Key Resolve.

: Bush and Roh agree to hold summit on sidelines of UN in September.

: Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi visits Pyongyang and meets with Kim Jong-il.

: U.S. and South Korea sign bilateral trade agreement.

: U.S. and South Korean officials sign the FTA in Washington despite threat from Democratic Congressional leaders to oppose ratification of the agreement.

: South Korean PM Han Duck-soo says Korea has accepted new U.S. labor and environmental standards in the FTA, to further U.S. congressional ratification.

: A White House spokesman says the U.S. is “deeply troubled” by repeated North Korean short-range missile tests, which occurred on May 25, June 7, and June 27.

: IAEA inspectors visit the Yongbyon nuclear facility and the under construction facility in Taechon in North Korea.

: North Korea announces that it has received funds from the BDA accounts.

: Amb. Hill announces in Seoul that North Korea has reaffirmed its willingness to shut down its nuclear reactor under the Feb. 13 agreement.

: U.S. head nuclear talks envoy Amb. Hill visits Pyongyang and has discussions on “all aspects of the six-party process” with DPRK Foreign Minister Pak Ui-chan and nuclear talks counterpart Kim Gye-gwan.

: U.S. and South Korean negotiators begin talks in Seoul to negotiate additional FTA proposal submitted by the U.S.

: Ambassador Hill says BDA funds have been transferred to North Korea.

: ROK FM Song Min-soon and Secretary Rice consult by phone over the North Korean nuclear issue and the KORUS FTA.

: Seoul holds inter-agency ministers’ meeting to discuss the ROK’s position on Washington’s proposal based on new U.S. trade policy guidelines.

: The 13th Security Policy Initiative is held in Seoul. Topics covered relocation of U.S. bases and transfer of wartime control from the U.S. to South Korea.

: North Korea conducts a short-range missile test off its western coast.

: North Korea rejects implementing the Feb. 13 denuclearization agreement until the BDA dispute is resolved.

: Korean and U.S. FTA delegations meet in Washington to complete the legal review process of the FTA text.

: The full text of the U.S.-Korea FTA is released.

: PM Han Duck-soo says that Korea will not renegotiate the FTA even if requested by the U.S., however further talks are possible as “additional negotiations.”

: South Korea says it will “thoroughly consider” the U.S. request for renegotiation of the FTA.

: North and South Korea do a test-run of linked train lines. To do the test, South Korea agreed to supply the North with $80 million of aid to develop light industry.

: Chief South Korean FTA negotiator Amb. Kim Jong-hoon tells Yonhap News in a phone interview that “if the U.S. demands South Korea renegotiate to reflect its unilateral view, we could break down the agreement. We couldn’t one-sidely accept a request to renegotiate the agreement that already reflects the balance of interests.”

: Washington presents Seoul with specific text based on the new trade policy guidelines incorporating labor and environment concerns and a request to hold additional bilateral consultations in the later half of June.

: Amb. Vershbow says the U.S. seeks to revise U.S.-Korea FTA based on new U.S. trade policy guidelines that call for higher labor and environmental standards.

: ROK Trade Minister Kim Hyun-chong tells Amb. Vershbow that FTA renegotiations would be “impossible.”

: Washington announces new trade policy that incorporates labor, the environment, and intellectual property rights protection.

: Amb. Vershbow says a peace treaty ending the Korean War could be negotiated before President George W. Bush’s term ends.

: U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Alexander Vershbow says South Korea’s policy of engagement with North Korea should keep pace with denuclearization process.

: The second ROK-U.S. Consultations on Reconstruction and Stabilization is held to share experiences with providing emergency relief and reconstruction assistance for countries hit by natural disasters.

: U.S. and South Korea concludes free trade agreement.

: U.S. and South Korean trade negotiators announce conclusion of a free trade agreement.

: U.S. and ROK military hold 12th Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle exercises in South Korea.

: Deputy Assistant Secretary Glaser meets Chinese Foreign Ministry officials in Beijing to discuss the transfer of the frozen North Korean funds held at Banco Delta Asia to the Bank of China.

: Six-Party Talks abruptly adjourn after technical problems prevent the transfer of frozen funds in a Macau bank to North Korea.

: U.S. and North Korea agree on the release of $25 million in frozen funds in a Macau bank; Six-Party Talks open in Beijing.

: IAEA head ElBaradei meets in Beijing with U.S., Japanese, and South Korean ambassadors in charge of North Korean nuclear issues to report on his visit to North Korea from March 13 to 14.

: FM Song and Secretary Rice review the process of the Six-Party Talks working group discussions and the status of the KORUS FTA.

: U.S. Treasury finalizes a ruling against Banco Delta Asia that prohibits all U.S. financial institutions from maintaining correspondent accounts for BDA and prevents BDA from accessing the U.S. financial system. China expresses deep regret over Treasury’s decision. It also announces that treatment of the North Korean BDA account will be left to the discretion of the Macau authority.

: Assistant Secretary Hill arrives in Beijing to attend the denuclearization working group, Northeast Asia security working group, and the next round of Six-Party Talks.

: IAEA head Mohamed ElBaradei visits North Korea; President Roh calls for a new peace regime in Korea after the North Korea nuclear issue is settled.

: Prime Minister Abe reiterates “unfeigned apology” to the “comfort women” and that he stands by the Kono Statement – Japan’s acknowledgement and apology for Japan’s military direct involvement in the running of the “comfort stations” – on a Sunday morning NHK program

: The U.S. and North Korea hold working group meetings in New York to discuss North Korean nuclear arms programs, removal of North Korea from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism, and normalization of relations.

: PM Abe says that there is no evidence or testimony that the Japanese military forced the so-called women to become sex slaves during World War II.

: Newly appointed Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte travels to Japan, South Korea, and China to discuss Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, North Korea, regional security, the war on terrorism, and trade.

: U.S. Treasury official Glaser meets Macau authorities to discuss Treasury Department findings on Banco Delta Asia.

: Defense Secretary Robert Gates and ROK Defense Minister Kim Jang-soo meet in Washington to reaffirm and to look at the future of the U.S.-ROK alliance. They agree that the Joint Forces Command will be disestablished on April 17, 2012.

: Diplomats reach agreement at the Six-Party Talks on phasing in a denuclearization agreement for North Korea.

: President Roh Moo-hyun tells South Korean residents in Spain that he welcomes the breakthrough agreement because a permanent peace regime will not only ease tensions in the region, but also strengthen South Korea’s global credit rating.

: The New York Times reports that the North Korea demand for huge amount of oil and energy in exchange for its nuclear weapons program nearly stalls the talks.

: Asahi Shimbun reports that during the January Berlin U.S.-DPRK bilateral meeting the parties signed a memorandum of understanding under which North Korea agreed to freeze its Yongbyon nuclear reactors for energy and economic assistance.

: U.S. and South Korean negotiators meet to resolve differences on the relocation of U.S. military bases in South Korea.

: The Six-Party Talks convene in Beijing. At the conclusion of the proceedings, a phased “action for action” agreement is reached.

: The U.S. and ROK hold Security Policy Initiative talks.

: U.S. Congressman Michael Honda (D-Ca) introduces nonbinding resolution in the House of Representatives calling for the Japanese government to apologize unambiguously for its role in the “comfort women” issue during World War II.

: Treasury Deputy Assistant Secretary for Terrorist Financing and Financial Crimes Daniel Glaser hosts financial talks to discuss Banco Delta Asia and counterfeiting concerns with DPRK officials at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.

: U.S. and North Korean negotiators meet in Berlin to discuss the nuclear issue.

: U.S. and South Korean trade negotiators meet in Seoul to continue discussions on a free trade agreement.

: Vietnam’s East Asia Commercial Bank closes all correspondent accounts to transfer money in and out of North Korea. The decision was the result of Vietnam’s entry into the WTO and growing ties with the U.S.

: Robert Gates sworn in at the 22nd U.S. defense secretary.

: Six-Party Talks held in Beijing and recess with little progress. On the sidelines Dec. 19, the U.S. and the DPRK meet to discuss the BDA issues.

: Eighth UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is sworn in.

: In Senate confirmation hearings, Robert Gates, defense secretary-designate states “strong military-to-military relations in Asia, particularly with Japan and South Korea, complement regional diplomacy with deterrence.”

: Presidential memorandum is sent to Secretary Rice to impose sanctions on North Korea as described in Arms Export Control Act and the Atomic Energy Act.

: U.S. Special Envoy on Human Rights in North Korea Jay Lefkowitz attends a UN meeting on North Korean human rights abuses. He states that China and South Korea should play an active role pressing North Korea to end abuses.

: U.S. and South Korean defense officials finalize military burden-sharing arrangements for 2007.

: South Korea announces it has informed the U.S. of its plan to reduce the number of Korean troops in Iraq while extending their deployment for one year.

: The U.S. and South Korea open their fifth round of bilateral meetings on a Free Trade Agreement in Big Sky, Montana.

: Korea rejects second batch of U.S. beef.

: U.S. Commerce Department reveals that luxury goods such as ipods and jet skis are on the list of items banned for export to North Korea under UNSCR 1718.

: Ambassadors Christopher Hill and Kim Gye-gwan begin two days of meetings in Beijing about resuming the Six-Party Talks; South Korea extends its deployment of troops in Iraq for a year.

: Korea rejects shipment of U.S. beef because of bone fragments.

: In Hanoi, Presidents Bush and Roh reaffirm their joint stance not to tolerate North Korea’s nuclear program.

: U.S. and South Korean defense officials begin two days of meetings on burden-sharing arrangements in Washington.

: South Korea announces it will not join Proliferation Security Initiative.

: First sub-ministerial meeting of the ROK-U.S. Strategic Consultation for Allied Partnership is held in Seoul with Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade Yu Myung-hwan and Under Secretary Burns heading the respective delegations.

: President Roh nominates Lee Jae-jeong, senior vice president of the Advisory Council on Democratic and Peaceful Unification as unification minister; Song Min-soon, chief secretary to the president for unification, foreign, and security affairs as foreign minister; Kim Jang-soo, Army chief of staff, as minister of defense; and Kim Man-bok, first deputy director of the National Intelligence Service (NIS), as NIS director.

: North Korea announces that it will return to the Six-Party Talks after a secret meeting between Kim Gye-gwan, Christopher Hill, and Wu Dawei. U.S. tells North Korea that it is prepared to discuss issues surrounding Banco Delta Asia and to form a working group to address the issue.

: Secretary General-elect and ROK Foreign Minister Ban makes a working visit to China to meet President Hu, State Councilor Tang, and Foreign Minister Li Zhaoxing and to discuss the North Korea nuclear standoff.

: Fourth round of U.S.-Korea talks on a Free Trade Agreement open in Jeju.

: U.S. and Korea reach agreement on transfer of wartime operational control at the 38th Security Consultative Meeting in Washington.

: ROK, U.S., and Japan foreign ministers hold a two-hour trilateral meeting at ROK FM Ban’s residence. This is the first trilateral meeting among the three countries ministers since October 2000.

: Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in Seoul urges President Roh Moo-hyun to “take stock of the leverage we have” on North Korea.

: The 28th ROK-U.S. Military Committee Meeting (MCM) is held in Washington, D.C.

: U.S. Congress enacts National Defense Authorization Act for 2007, which requires appointment of a senior U.S. coordinator on Korea within 60 days.

: Ambassador Vershbow urges South Korea to “thoroughly review” economic ties with North Korea.

: UN General Assembly elects ROK Foreign Minister Ban Ki-moon as the next UN secretary general.

: UNSC imposes sanctions on North Korea for its nuclear test.

: DPRK Korea Central News Agency declares U.S.-initiated UN sanctions an “act of war.”

: North Korea announces that it has successfully completed an underground test of its nuclear bomb.

: North Korea conducts an underground nuclear test.

: Ambassador Vershbow says the nuclear test makes bilateral talks with North Korea less likely.

: Presidents Roh Moo-hyun and George W. Bush have a 20-minute phone conversation regarding the announcement of the nuclear test by North Korea.

: U.N. Security Council issues an unanimous statement that a nuclear test would “jeopardize peace, stability and security in the region and beyond.”

: UN Security Council (UNSC) expresses “deep concern” about a possible North Korean nuclear test.

: U.S. sends a message to DPRK via their UN mission in New York not to conduct the test.

: North Korea announces that it would conduct a nuclear test at an unspecified future date.

: North Korea announces it “is set to conduct a nuclear test in the future.”

: Assistant Secretary Hill at a CSIS conference states that the Six-Party Talks will enter a “crucial phase” in coming weeks and confirmed that Secretary Rice will be visiting Beijing, Seoul, and Tokyo to get the talks back on track.

: U.S. Ambassador to Korea Alexander Vershbow tells Yonhap News that Assistant Secretary Hill could visit Pyongyang if the DPRK agrees to return to the table.

: U.S. and ROK participate in second round of Five Plus Five Talks in NY; China and Russia opt out.

: Ambassador Hill and South Korea’s envoy to the Six-Party Talks meet in New York.

: U.S. scholar Selig Harrison visits North Korea and has a six-hour conversation with the DPRK’s six-party negotiator Kim Gye-gwan. Kim tells Harrison that Pyongyang would be extracting more plutonium from its Yongbyon reactor.

: President George W. Bush and President Moo-hyun Roh hold a summit meeting in Washington.

: London Sunday Telegraph reports that Russian diplomats in Pyongyang believe that the probability of North Korea joining the nuclear club is very high.

: Third round of ROK-U.S. free trade agreement negotiations take place in Seattle, Washington. Korea announces it will resume beef imports from the U.S.

: Assistant Secretary Hill visit Japan, China, and South Korea to discuss regional and global issues with senior government officials in the three countries. He will also meet with the six-party negotiators to get North Korea back to the table.

: Ban Ki-moon tells reporters that Seoul is reviewing an action plan in the case of a possible North Korean nuclear test.

: ROK chief delegate to the Six-Party Talks Chun Young-woo meets U.S. chief delegate, Assistant Secretary of State Hill in Washington, D.C.

: U.S. and South Korea pharmaceutical sector experts meet in Singapore to work out the pharmaceutical details of the KORUS FTA.

: U.S. and South Korea start annual Ulchi Focus Lens military exercise; U.S. and South Korean trade negotiators meet in Singapore.

: U.S. Trade Representative Susan Schwab rules out inclusion of Kaesong-made products in U.S.-Korea FTA.

: ABC News reports that U.S. intelligence believes that a North Korea nuclear test is a “real possibility.”

: Ambassador Vershbow says that transferring operation control of armed forces during wartime to South Korea will strengthen the U.S.-Korea alliance.

: The U.S. and South Korea conclude third round of defense burden-sharing negotiations without reaching agreement.

: Soldiers of North and South Korea exchange limited rifle fire at the DMZ.

: The ASEAN Regional Forum opens in Kuala Lumpur; Secretary Rice, FM Ban and eight other foreign ministers conduct side meeting to discuss the nuclear negotiations with North Korea while the DPRK foreign minister boycotts the meeting.

: ASEAN Plus Three Senior Officials and Foreign Ministers meetings held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

: Ad hoc consultations among East Asia Summit senior officials take place in Kuala Lumpur.

: President Roh objects to a U.S. hardline policy of “strangling” North Korea.

: Six North Koreans will be granted permanent residency in U.S. for fiscal year 2007 as part of the 2007 Diversity Visa Lottery.

: Stuart Levey, U.S. undersecretary for terrorism and financial intelligence, briefs officials in Hanoi on illicit North Korean banking activities in Vietnam.

: UN Security Council unanimously condemns North Korea’s missile tests with passage of UNSCR 1695.

: South Korea and the U.S. hold ninth Security Policy Initiative talks.

: South Korea lodges a strong complaint against North Korea for firing Scud missiles that could reach any area of South Korea and urges North Korea to return to Six-Party Talks; Ambassador Hill meets with Chinese officials in Beijing.

: Second round of Korea-U.S. FTA negotiations held in Seoul. The meeting ends a day early after the parties are unable to come to an agreement over pharmaceutical sector and other sensitive issues.

: Assistant Secretary of East Asia and Pacific Affairs Christopher Hill travels to consult with Six-Party Talk negotiators in Beijing, Seoul, and Tokyo.

: North Korea test launches six short- and medium-range missiles and one long-range missile.

: North Korea launches seven missiles – six Nodong and Scud and one Taepodong 2. All fall into the Sea of Japan.

: Eight nations including Japan and South Korea participate in the 20th Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2006 exercises.

: Ambassador Vershbow says issue of Gaeseong goods could “poison” U.S.-Korea FTA negotiation.

: In a Washington Post editorial, former Clinton defense officials William Perry and Ashton Carter argue for a preemptive strike against North Korea’s Taepodong missile while it is still on the launch pad; the White House quickly rules out this option.

: Bush administration says it does not have conclusive information about pending North Korean missile test; former President Kim Dae-jung postpones planned visit to North Korea.

: FM Ban urges North Korea to engage in a human rights dialogue.

: FM Ban says that South Korea and the U.S. are “deeply concerned” about reports that North Korea may test fire a Taepodong 2 missile.

: First round of negotiations for a U.S.-Korea FTA opens in Washington.

: After a U.S.-Korea defense ministers meeting in Singapore, DM Yoon says Korea will obtain full operational control of its military from the U.S. in five to six years.

: White House spokesman implies rejection of North Korean invitation to Ambassador Hill to visit North Korea; KEDO announces its official termination.

: South Korea holds by-elections. The opposition Grand National Party wins a majority in National Assembly, regional, and local government contests. The ruling Uri Party does not win a single seat in the National Assembly.

: ROK FM Ban travels to U.S. to attend meeting on HIV/AIDS at the UN and to consult with U.S. counterparts in Washington over Six-Party Talks.

: Ambassador Hill begins two days of discussions in Seoul on the Six-Party Talks; U.S. and South Korea conduct Security Policy Initiative meeting in Hawaii.

: U.S. and China reach agreement for four North Korean defectors seeking asylum at the U.S. Consulate in Shenyang to travel to the United States.

: South Korea begins withdrawal of troops from Iraq; ban on U.S. citizens maintaining any business relationship with North Korean-flagged vessels takes effect.

: Six North Korean refugees arrive in the United States.

: ROK police eject protesters from site of planned U.S. base in Pyongtaek.

: ROK President Roh meets USFK Commander Gen. B.B. Bell at the Blue House in Seoul. Also present are DM Yoon Kwang-ung and U.S. Ambassador to Seoul Alexander Vershbow.

: South Korea’s Ministry of Unification accuses U.S. Human Rights Envoy Jay Lefkowitz of “unthinkable intervention” for criticizing humanitarian aid to North Korea; President Bush meets with defectors from North Korea at the White House.

: At a summit meeting in Washington, President Bush asks Chinese President Hu Jintao to urge North Korea to attend the Six-Party Talks.

: U.S. trade official Wendy Cutler says the U.S.-Korea FTA will have to address nontariff barriers in addition to normal tariff reduction issues.

: Ambassador Kim Gye